Clock by Hugh Kearney & Co. Wolcottville Conn

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Jim DuBois, Apr 28, 2018.

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  1. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Apologies for grabbing photos off Facebook and posting them here but thought this clock to be of a rare enough maker that we should record it here. While he is a known and listed maker both the rareness of the label and the very few clocks known by him still around, this is worth posting.

    31351468_10213917052072132_6094032688217218527_n.jpg 31340525_10213917051032106_6614724447269637179_n.jpg 31351483_10213917049432066_5755438607685908386_n.jpg 31354658_10213917051272112_7540150585655309108_n.jpg
     
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  2. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    A first for me.
     
  3. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Yes, a new to me label for certain. I don't think I have ever seen a clock by this fellow before, and like you Sooth, I have a lot of photos and have dug through a lot of clocks, so when something like this surfaces I get at least modestly interested....I have not found any other photos of one of his labels in any of the usual places, but I have not looked very hard, yet. I was hopeful one of our fellow wood works guys would have something on this maker. Here is one other I found in an on line auction house past auction file, but no photo of the label or movement etc...

    Hugh Kearney.jpg hugh kearney dial.jpg
     
  4. Dick C

    Dick C Registered User

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    Wolcottville CT is now Torrington CT if I read this history correctly. Their museum collections page indicates that they have clocks from the area. Perhaps they may have one of these?

    Manufacturing History
     
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  5. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  6. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    There is a fair amount of information in the book by Hodges, Theodore B., entitled Erastus Hodges,
    1781-1847: Connecticut Manufacturer, Merchant and Entrepreneur. That is an absolutely excellent resource for all sorts of clock related historical data of the area......

    part of what is said there includes;
    "Hugh Kearney did not use the Torrington style of movement, but either made movements in the style of Mark Leavenworth and Hopkins &Alfred, or bought their movements, or both. Kearney's name appears inthe Burton & Leavenworth account records as receiving thirteen clocks from their Waterbury shop in the 1820-22 period. Some of his pillar and scroll clocks exist today with a Hugh Kearney & Co., Wolcottville, Connecticut, label. The Kearney name only occasionally crops up in the Hodges papers."
     
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  7. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Jim, you may have to sit down and write an article on Kearney pulling together all these disiecta membra.
     
  8. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I have been working on an Ives paper for nearly 2 years and every time I touch it I find problems and frequently disagree with myself...150 pages and counting so Mr. Kearney will have to wait....but a good idea as there is very little in the bulletin about him......
     
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  9. Dick C

    Dick C Registered User

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    You might publish it and when you see that revisions/additions/deletions are needed you can always publish a revised edition.

    I am sure that you will also receive feedback who agree/disagree with some of your findings as well as additional information that few know is available.
     
  10. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Dick, firstly let me thank you for your thoughts in this;

    How to publish some of these things remains an issue these days. There have been several extremely nice clock books released in the last few years, say the last 10 years. None of them have been run away successes. I am not aware of any that made money and that is a subject that has been discussed firsthand with several of the authors. The audience size is quite limited.

    I have spoken with leadership of the NAWCC in regards to Suppliments. The Ives paper I am working on would fit that method of deliver better than most other approaches but it is my understanding there will be no more suppliments due to cost and limited interest.

    The only thing that makes much sense is self publishing I think. I have had at least some cursory discussions in that regard with people experience in these areas. For the quantity I plan to have printed it appears as if my cost would be $25-35 each and that does not include any make ready or special covers or the like. Right now the plan is to have a number printed and then give them away to interested parties of the subject.

    So, I suspect it will be a one time effort.....
     
  11. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Have you thought about hosting/posting it on the web? Obviously you need a host and that costs some money. I'm not sure what is available through the NAWCC web avenues, but $25-$35 buys about a year of hosting from many providers.

    I have a tool that I developed and use for documenting our products in HTML / PDF format. It is template driven so the look can be customized. It also includes automatically generated navigation menu, table of contents and glossary/index. You can see a sample here (this document about the documentation system is published using the documentation system) DynaDoc Introduction.

    PM me if interesting in discussing this further.

    Tom
     
  12. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Tom,

    I have not entertained a web hosting sort of solution as the primary delivery mechanism for this particular paper. I have some reasons for creating hard copy. I am a strong supporter of electronic delivery in some uses but I have also had a fair amount of experience with utilization rates of hard copy versus electronic and I still see some advantages to having a book lying about.

    However, I do plan an electronic version in conjunction with the hard copy. That would be no more than a searchable PDF of the original as I was thinking.

    And thanks for the suggestion, as mentioned I had not considered a website as a delivery methodology. That sort of gives me some other ideas but I would change the information format considerably to make it more interactive etc. I will give it some more thought....
     
  13. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    There is something about a good hardcopy. I remember reading Arizona Highways as a kid. It was exciting and unique for an East Coast kid. The Internet has provided exposure to so much more, but it has taken away that special experience of turning those pages. I wouldn't give up the Internet and am surprised that Arizona Highways is still in print, but the times have changed, so I don't feel the same satisfaction. I guess I should go visit my local library... Where was it again? Let me Google map that on my phone.

    Tom
     
  14. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    As I sit down for casual reading I often prefer hard copy. I have read a fair number of ebooks, 100+/-, I could carry several when traveling and hard copy didn't aways work well on long trips and long flights. I also have read a number ebooks here at my desk, but it seems I have better recall from hard copy in hand. It is also much easier to scan hard copy photos/descriptions/moderate levels of detail and fit together a bit better flow and understand relationships of various pieces of information, as I work. However, electronic versions are really the answer when researching, or finding something you lost in details etc. A couple of my clock books I use and have used for a very long time are the two books by Roberts, one on Ives and the other on Terry. It is amazing what can be found with even the bad PDF search tools offered by Adobe.....I also have electronic versions of Erastus Hodges book on Torrington Clock history as well as many of the COG Journals etc. Amazing what is in those pubs that I can now find....
     
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  15. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Another of these P&S clocks by Hugh Kearney has surfaced. A nice example, but I have learned no more about him or his work. Anybody have anything new?

    kearney.jpg kearney 2.jpg kearney.jpg kearney 3.jpg
     
  16. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Just killing time (no pun intended) waiting for a meeting to start and was perusing the WW Forum.

    Came upon this interesting discussion of Hugh Kearney pillar and scrolls.

    Scroll down to posting # 15 (a whole lot of scrolling going on).

    Well, one thing that caught my eye was the label:

    kearney.jpg

    Note it says "Made by Hopkins and Alfred". Also see posting # 6 on this thread with info about the postulated sources of HK's movements.

    Now see this thread about a "transition" clock by Hopkins and Alfred:

    Hopkins and Alfred

    Included are some links to relevant Bulletin articles about Hopkins and Alfred as well as other references. See especially the second article that covers in some detail the "Leavenworth" like movements made by H&A. Still, rather different than the movement pictured in the first posting on this thread which looks to me more like a Leavenworth? Here is the movement of that first posted pillar and scroll side by side with the movement in the H&A "transition" clock for comparison:

    kearney 2.jpg hopkins and alfred 9.JPG

    What's all the white stuff on the first movement??

    The other thing that caught my eye was the door of the pillar and scroll in posting # 15 of this thread. Compare it to the door of the H&A. Look closely Again, side by side pix to facilitate comparison :

    kearney3.jpg Hopkins and alfred 1.JPG

    Note that same little detail in the corners of both doors. Much discussion about case features and how they may be an additional piece of information relating clocks and makers, suggesting a possible chronology, etc.

    And yes, for chuckles, check out the dials of both clocks. Yes, I know, one Roman numerals, the other Arabic. But otherwise, essentially the same dial?

    RM
     
  17. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    #17 Jim DuBois, Aug 26, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
    You mention Leavenworth? I came across this last week and I was told it is by Leavenworth. I did not get the opportunity to check it out further, but it is a true hollow column per the owner. I don't recall seeing anything close to this style case. But, I might be able to get at some more detail on it.

    See below on my very recent findings regarding Hugh Kearney and his P&S. I saw it in person last month. Certainly an uncommon maker. There is not a word about him in over 3000 pages of the COG Counters journal either, so we can call this example pretty rare? I guess we should send this information into the COG?

    2019-08-15 11.17.51 (3).jpg
    From the book on Erastus Hodges:
    "Kearney either made movements in the style of Mark Leavenworth and Hopkins & Alfred, or bought their movements, or both. Kearney's name appears in the Burton & Leavenworth account records as receiving thirteen clocks from their Waterbury shop in the 1820-22 period.30 Some of his pillar and scroll clocks exist today with a Hugh Kearney & Co., Wolcottville, Connecticut, label.

    The Kearney name only occasionally crops up in the Hodges papers. In December 1826, a daybook entry charges Hugh Kearney & Company for ivy timbers for clocks ($19.00), sold by Norris North. This was a considerable amount of ivy wood. Further daybook entries include the sale of oil and turpentine to Kearney in January 1827, and more oil, turpentine, and copa] varnish in April 1827. These items came from the North clock shop rather than the Hodges store.

    Since Kearney apparently lived in Wolcottville, there would have been no reason to travel the two or three miles uphill to the Hodges store, when Abernethy's store in Wolcottville (after 1825) would have served his purposes. After the Hodges branch store opened in Wolcottville in 1831 or 1832, Hugh Kearney was a fairly frequent customer. Most of the entries involve Kearney's transportation of
    goods to and from Hartford (or Avon). He carried cheese and cotton yarn from Erastus Hodges's store and cotton factory, and brought back plaster, salt, molasses, and (in season) fresh shad.
    The only clock-related items after 1830 for Hugh Kearney are two from 1834: ln July he bought twenty sets of clock weights ($4.20); and in April some small purchases on the Kearney account were picked up at the Wolcottville store by Norris North, who was still living in Wolcottville at that time. All of this is pretty thin gruel, but it appears that Kearney was making cases, or assembling clocks, or perhaps making entire clocks in 1826-27; had turned to carting by the early 1830s; and may have had a connection with Norris North in the 1831-34 period when North made some clocks in Wolcottville."
     
  18. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Interesting.

    RE: the hollow column. I have seen that case style, both with round and octagonal columns. For example, there's one by Orton, Preston & Co in "Good for a Time", page 120. I am sure that the clock you picture was recently sold at auction. Just can't recall where. I actually think I was an underbidder.

    I would report it in the CCJ.

    By the way, I let my membership lapse. It seemed that I never got anything but dues notices.

    RM
     
  19. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    #19 Jim DuBois, Aug 27, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2019
    The clock was from a Cattone's Auction in 2016 I find. It may have surfaced in another auction since then as the fellow who has it now seemed to suggest he just got it. So, who knows? But since it is an uncommon clock and I have more photos of it. I will toss them in here for future parties who may be interested.

    RM, I think you know all the following but I am sticking it out here in case others may have an interest in woodworks clocks and all the minutia we share in that regard in the COG;

    Regards the CCJ and output, there is an annual (these days) publication of all that has been submitted by the members, it is available (at extra cost) both paper ($20) and or electronic versions ($7 DVD). Very nicely done I might add. There is also the annual picnic the day before the ESR, as well as 2 or 3 annual chapter meetings in conjunction with other regionals and the National. There is also the website where members can NOW have access to all the COG's since day one, less the most current 5 issues. To suggest this is a great resource is a vast understatement. There are over 3000 pages of COG Journals now, much of the information, photos, and other information on woodworks is not published elsewhere. So, if you don't buy the annual publication, go to the ESR and or SOR, etc, don't go to the National, and don't access the website as a member then all you get is the annual dun for dues and an email or two per year! Since it is an NAWCC chapter these days here is an active link to our intro page COG Counters

    0620shbuil.jpg 0620shbuil_det2 (2).jpg 0620shbuil_det1.jpg
     
  20. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I agree. I need to send my dues in and get reinvolved.

    That's the clock! I now believe the auction I was thinking of was the Cottone's one and I was the underbidder. Just didn't realize 2 years had passed.

    Thanks.

    RM
     

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