Click Spring

Ed Schmitt

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Aug 30, 2003
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Earlier this year I repaired a E Ingraham calendar clock. The customer said the spring broke, but actually it was the click spring. I replaced the entire click, spring and rivet. Today the customer brings it back and said it acted like before. His finger is black and blue from getting hit by the key upon winding the movement. He handed me the click spring, and a quick look at the click showed that the spring just came out. What is the best way to secure the spring into the click so it won't come out. I'm thinking of using just a small amount of "tix" solder. I can also stake it. But what are your feelings. Of course this is a freebee for the customer.

Ed
Shadows of Times Past
 

Cactus50

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Jan 28, 2001
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Ed, the best method is to stake the wire in place. Solder has no strength and may or may not secure it for the long run. Anyway, I have found that it is good practice to always stake this type of click before riveting it to the mai wheel as it is not uncommon for the wire to be loose when new.
 

Joseph Bautsch

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Dec 9, 2006
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ED - Catus50 is right. Don't use solder. The soldering process will anneal the spring and soften the metal at the point of contact. Over a period of time the spring will break at the solder point. A lot of the clicks will have a hole drilled in them in which the spring is staked. Also a lot of these clicks have a grove cut in the top for the spring to ride in. In that case the down thrust of the spring must be parallel to the direction of the click movement. Otherwise the spring will come out of the grove.
 

Ed Schmitt

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Cactus and Joe... Thanks for the response. The spring on this click sets in a groove along the side of the click. Once I completely take the movement apart again, I'll stake the spring to the click from the side. Hopefully this will work.

Ed
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Ed,

Push the spring through the hole or slot and bend a sharp but short bend at the tip, in plane with the click. This way there is no way for the wire to pull back out.

Whether you stake or solder should probably be based on how good you are at staking vs soldering. :) Either is totaly satisfactory in my experience but sometimes one might be favored over the other.

Good luck, Willie X
 

Joseph Bautsch

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ED - Another suggestion. Check the grove on the click. If it's worn then that might be your problem. Take a triangular needle file or knife file and deepen the grove then make sure the spring is applying pressure parallel to the movement of the click. Also make sure the end of the spring is shaped so that it runs smoothly in the grove. This way you may not have to remove the click and you leave the works in it's original condition with minimal repair showing.
 

Ed Schmitt

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Aug 30, 2003
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JB
I'm confused as to how to do as you suggested without taking the movement apart to get to the click? The slot in the click runs between the click and the first wheel. At this time I'm not sure if I'll have to remove the rivet to stake the spring in place.

Ed
 

shutterbug

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You'll need to take it apart again. I don't like to heat springs, and solder would require that you do. I'd go with the bent tip idea :)
 

Joseph Bautsch

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Dec 9, 2006
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ED - Yes you have to take the works apart to get to the click. However my suggestion would not require you to remove the click from its rivet mounting to do the hole drilling, staking and bending. Just re-file the grove, check the the parallel alignment of the spring to the movement of the click and make sure the tip of the spring moves smoothly in the click grove. I've done this a number of times and it gives you a repair with minimal invasion of the works originality.
 

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