Cleaning a movement twice

Vernon

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Maybe I'm wierd or something but I clean movements two times. Each time is a full dismantle. The first time is to remove the grime and old oils so I can see where the wear is. The second is to remove the shavings, polishes etc. from doing the repairs. Is this unusual?
 

ticktock19852004

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Apr 5, 2007
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Hello!

No, not at all. I clean movements twice for the same reason. I disassemble the movement and clean it in an ultrasonic. Then I take the movement out and inspect for wear and necessary repairs. Then I will run it through the ultrasonic again and remove any stubborn spots with a brass brush.

Thanks!

Neal
 

Dave B

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I remove the shavings, polishes, sharpie marks etc from repairs to the plates by using the vegetable sprayer in the sink, and scrubbing with a toothbrush. Shake the water off, and a quick dip and more toothbrush scrubbing in alchohol, followed by drying with a blast of compressed air does the trick. Then into the drying box, to be certain all water is completely gone before final assembly, lube, and regulation.

For all handling of plates after the first cleaning, I wear nitrile gloves, so I don't get fingerprints all over them.
 

shutterbug

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I let the mainsprings down and vigorously move the train by hand, noting any movement at the pivots. If it's excessive, I make a note of which wheel, and whether front or back. Then disassemble, clean and bush those areas I noted. Then a quick check for proper tilt on each wheel during reassembly to verify none were missed and it's done. I don't like to do things twice, even though it sometimes is necessary :)
 

Scottie-TX

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My regimen also is usually two cleanings. One to begin work, the second to clean in preparation for asembly. I don't like installing bushings in dirty plates or polishing pivots on dirty wheels.
 

bkerr

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Ditto Scotttie, I hate working on a dirty old movement. I give it a dunk in the us and use compressed air on each pivot to "clean it out" then I can better see the plate condition (wear).

From there I will polish pivots mark all relpacement bushes and rebush checking each bushing as I go. Then I will bring the plates together without springs to check each train. After that it goes back to the us to remove the sharpe notes, clear the filings, blow out again. Then to the oven to bake it off. The oven time is ten minutes, final assembly, oil and test stand of a week.
 

Vernon

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Bkerr, I too have learned to check each train separately (springless and leverless) after repairs. Thanks for the replies thus far. You know, in reading books and the MB. over the coarse of time, it seemed clear that it was only necessary to clean the movement just once. I guess that you can get away with that if it's not dripping and full of dirt. Most of what I get just are not that way however. Glad that I'm not a total freak... :p
 

Vernon

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Willie, how do you manage when you have one dripping and there is green or black gel around the pivots? How can you tell what needs bushed? :confused:
 

shutterbug

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We lost a couple of pages! What happened?
 

Dave B

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My overhaul regimen is as follows:

Inspect movement, and photograph it, if it is not one I already have photos of.
Dunk and swish in acetone, to get all the heavy grime, WD 40 or whatever else is on it off, before I contaminate my US cleaner.

Then complete disassembly and into the US cleanrer for a while. Rinse off with water, followed by alchohol, then into the drying oven.

While it is drying, I clean and lube the springs.
Don nitrile gloves, and bring the movement out of the drying oven. Polish all pivots. Reassemble without levers and springs. Push each train back and forth, and note ovaled pivot holes, or holes that are now too large for the polished pivots. Mark the ovaled holes with an arrow in the direction of wear, and circle the holes that are just too large.

Do the bushing work.
Do the re-cleaning of the plates, as described in a previous post, and reassemble with all levers and springs, and do all the lube. Test run the movement for two full cycles of from fully wound to fully unwound. Place the movement in the case, and run for another cycle of fully wound to fully unwound. Then, and only then, call the client, and make arrangements to deliver the repaired clock. On the nearest end of the month following the date of return, begin the one year warranty period.
 
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Mike Phelan

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Twice for me, at least. :thumb:

As to what I actually do depends on what sort of clock - a wood movement BF is not quite the same as an OG, nor is a French roulant.

Those who do it for a living won't have the same approach - for me, time is not money.
 
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