Clarke, Gilbert has a weight problem

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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Hello all, I picked up a Clarke, Gilbert & Co. OG Improved Brass Clock. I disassembled it, clean, re-bushed and reassembled. The weights that came with it are 3lb 2.7oz on the strike and 2lb 5.2oz on the time. Put the movement back into the case and found that the Strike weight is far to heavy. There are no markings on the movement. Appears to be the same as the Seth Thomas. Question, did I leave something out of the reassembly. The strike works with only a 2lb weight. the time side is working fine with the original. Obviously I'm new at this. Any suggestions as to where to find the problem would be appreciated. Thank you.

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shutterbug

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Check the fan, to be sure it is not slipping and allowing the strike train to run too fast. If that's not the issue, switch the weights around and see how that works. The time side won't be terribly affected by the increase in weight, although it may wear faster. Alternately, get lighter weights.
 

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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1
Check the fan, to be sure it is not slipping and allowing the strike train to run too fast. If that's not the issue, switch the weights around and see how that works. The time side won't be terribly affected by the increase in weight, although it may wear faster. Alternately, get lighter weights.
Check the fan, to be sure it is not slipping and allowing the strike train to run too fast. If that's not the issue, switch the weights around and see how that works. The time side won't be terribly affected by the increase in weight, although it may wear faster. Alternately, get lighter weights.
Thanks shutterbug, the only thing I see is that the lantern pinion wires are pretty worn. I've tried switching weights with very little difference
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Thanks shutterbug, the only thing I see is that the lantern pinion wires are pretty worn. I've tried switching weights with very little difference
After a more testing, using a 1lb 10oz weight and raised to the top, the strike is fast and as the weight drops about 1/4 of the way the strike begins to slow.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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That is unusual.

Have you actually removed the fly and made sure it's snug on the arbor, as others have mentioned.

The only other culprits I can think of are: Friction at the pulley at the top of the case. Or, at the roller (usually in the strike side board up high), the roller could be stuck/missing, or the cord could be dragging on a notch cut in the roller, or against the cutout in the sideboard.

Notes, A stack of big washers makes a good (and easily adjustable) weight. Also, these clocks strike fast normally. Rarely slower than one hit per second.

Willie X
 

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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That is unusual.

Have you actually removed the fly and made sure it's snug on the arbor, as others have mentioned.

The only other culprits I can think of are: Friction at the pulley at the top of the case. Or, at the roller (usually in the strike side board up high), the roller could be stuck/missing, or the cord could be dragging on a notch cut in the roller, or against the cutout in the sideboard.

Notes, A stack of big washers makes a good (and easily adjustable) weight. Also, these clocks strike fast normally. Rarely slower than one hit per second.

Willie X
Thanks Willie, I'll check out your suggestions. Much appreciated--
James
 

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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Thanks Willie, I'll check out your suggestions. Much appreciated--
James
Willie, I took the clock apart and the only thing that looks strange to me is the fly bushing setup. Photos attached. Haven't done that many clocks. Haven't seen this before. Appreciate your thoughts..Thanks, James

IMG_0670.JPG IMG_0671.JPG
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Is the plate recessed with a protruding bushing?

Anyhoo, the question at hand ... does the fly have some resistance to turning. If it spins freely on the shaft, it will need to be tightened a bit. There are many ways to do this, some better than others.

Willie X
 

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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1
Is the plate recessed with a protruding bushing?

Anyhoo, the question at hand ... does the fly have some resistance to turning. If it spins freely on the shaft, it will need to be tightened a bit. There are many ways to do this, some better than others.

Willie X
Willie, The bushing protrudes .54mm..The fly was free wheeling and now I've tighten it down so it does have resistance. Hope I didn't tighten too much. --James
 
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Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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If fly spring is too tight it will simply "bounce" when the strike stops. Not too much of a problem as other clocks were made like that.
 

James Lucas

Registered User
Aug 25, 2020
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Willie, The bushing protrudes .54mm..The fly was free wheeling and now I've tighten it down so it dose have resistance. Hope I didn't tighten too much. --James
Willie, you nailed it. By tightening fly all is working well. Thanks to all--James
 
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