Chimes 13

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by bobbiejoe, Jul 8, 2018.

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  1. bobbiejoe

    bobbiejoe Registered User

    Aug 22, 2015
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    #1 bobbiejoe, Jul 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
    Not sure what is going on with the clock. At 12 it will strike 13.
    Just to the left of the excape wheel is a wire that hangs down. That wire has a hook on the end. Should it be hooked somewhere or should it have weight on it?

    20180708_130420.jpg



    Also, does anyone know what this hook is for?
     
  2. bobbiejoe

    bobbiejoe Registered User

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    20180708_131454.jpg
    Sorry I couldn't get this picture to insert...
     
  3. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
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    Your clock has "countwheel", AKA "locking plate" or "locking wheel" striking. In this configuration, the striking wheel train is triggered to strike the hour count when the minute hand passes 12, and then (usually) once when it passes 6 (i.e. on the half hour.) Otherwise, this train is independent of the time train; it increments the strike count each time it runs. So, it strikes 1, then another one for the half hour, then two, then one for the half, then three, etc. Unfortunately, it can get out of synch with the time train, and count too many, or too few times for the time indicated on the dial. To enable the user to get it back in synch, the little wire with the looped end is provided to trigger the strike, allowing it to increment itself to correct the error. Just push it up gently (usually- otherwise, pull it down) a little, and the striking train will run through a cycle. If the strike is 1 hour behind the time indicated on the dial, pushing it twice will advance the strike to the next hour. If the strike is ahead of the dial by an hour, you must push it repeatedly to advance the strike through as many hours as needed to synch with the time. If it's striking the half hour at the hour, you'll have to advance it by an hour, because the single half-hour strike doesn't tell you which hour the strike is set to. It's a poor idea to move the hands backwards to synch the time and strike; this can damage the mechanism.
    If the clock is striking more than twelve, it means that the movement needs to be serviced- something is wrong.
     
  4. bobbiejoe

    bobbiejoe Registered User

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    Would you know if the J.C. Brown should strike on the half hour? It does not seem that it ment to.
    I believe the striking train is the rod that runs to the gear, am I right? If so, it has a slight curve in it. The head does not sit all the way down. Would that be the cause for the incorrect strikes?
     
  5. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    That wire is a strike adjustment wire. If for some reason the hour struck does not match the time shown on the dial, lifting that wire will allow you to adjust strike until it matches the time shown. These little buggers often enough become fouled with one thing or another causing the strike to go off. I often remove them on clocks I run to avoid that potential problem, but I keep them in the clock case. However, it is not clear that this wire is the cause of the problem you mention, but if you remove it and test the movement you will find out.

    This clock does not have a half-hour strike. It strikes only the hours. The count wheel on your movement appears to be a 24-hour count wheel, i.e., it makes a 360-degree rotation once in a twenty-four hour period. So, I ask, does the strike "go off" each time the clock strikes 12, i.e., does it strike 13 instead of 12 both at "noon" and "midnight"? Sometimes, the count lever, after finishing its hourly strike, can make contact with the next tooth ahead of it when dropping into the slot. The "one-o'clock" tooth is often a culprit, because it is thinner than the others and subject to malformations. Adjustment of the tooth - straightening, filing out burrs, or what have you - might be in order. Another possible problem is that the vertical chop of the count lever might need a bit of adjustment to avoid hitting that tooth. However, if all the other hours work fine, I would be cautious about adjusting/bending it. Correcting for only one slot might lead to problems with others
     
  6. bobbiejoe

    bobbiejoe Registered User

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    Beautifully explained. There is so much that I want to ask about.....geez.....I hate typing it all out.
    The clock was chiming very fast. By putting a little weight on the trip wire it slowed the chime to what I think is a better speed.
    Also, after using the trip wire it added chimes to a different hour. I know it needs a suspension spring. But that is all I am sure of.
     
  7. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Bobbie joe, I just hate it when it gets that late. (13) The fast strike is normal for these old clocks. However, it should not strike extremely fast. Check the fly and see if it is loose on it’s arbor. If so, it can be adjusted so it slows down the strike train. The suspension spring is connected to a long piece of wire which has a hook near the bottom of the clock. The pendulum bob has an adjustable rating nut to adjust the time. Is this in the clock?
     

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