Chime wheel starts and stops wrong

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Lcalbert, Aug 27, 2018.

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  1. Lcalbert

    Lcalbert New Member

    Aug 27, 2018
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    I saw this clock at a local auction and it's not pretty but I've never owned a mechanical clock so I got this one cheap because I've always wanted one. I don't know anything about it really but it seems to work except that the chimes start and stop the melody at the wrong spot... The best way I know how to explain it is for the Westminster chimes that are split into four quarters on the quarter hour it chimes the second quarter of the melody (but just once) then at half past it does what sounds like quarter 1 twice. The at a quarter to it does 2,1,1. Something along that pattern instead of 1; 1,2; 1,2,3; 1,2,3,4 (I believe 1 and 3 and 2 and 4 are the same but I don't know how else to describe it)

    wtHR2LF.jpg lQuu29I.jpg

    Im acknowleding my terminology is probably totally wrong for the parts.

    What I think is happening is that the chimes wheel (whatever it's called the thing that works like a music box) is set to the wrong spot.

    I want some advice on how to fix it since it doesn't seem like it would be that difficult just don't want to break it in the process.

    Idea 1) I can turn the gear manually until the chime wheel is at the correct spot
    Idea 2) the top gear in the photo (I think that's the drive gear) has a set screw that could be loosened to release it from the drive shaft and then turn it manually then tighten the screw.

    #1 is easier of course but I don't know what it looks like behind the plate so I could damage it
    #2 is harder but seems safer since I'm a total amature and don't like the idea of turning something that's not supposed to turn manually. I would just need to find a tiny flathead screwdriver to fit in there to do it.
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    Turn the minute hand until the hour chime is activated. If the hand is not pointed up, take it off and put it back on in the up position. If it's still not right on, there's a bushing on the hand that will allow you to put a file handle or other such device into the bushing and turn the hand (at the base, so it doesn't bend) to the proper spot. Any other issues will have to be taken care of on the back of the movement itself, so let us know.
     
  3. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Jun 24, 2008
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    Welcome. In your second photo, the wheel on the top left has a set screw on the back side of it. If you slightly loosen that screw, you can turn it and it will rotate the pinned wheel at the bottom which lifts the hammers. The best way to set it is to move the minute hand forward till it reaches 1/4 after the hour and chimes four notes. Then turn the wheel on the back until the four descending pitches are struck by the hammers. Then tighten the set screw. The problem you will have is turning the set screw, unless you remove the movement. It is. Easy. With the movement removed.
     
  4. Lcalbert

    Lcalbert New Member

    Aug 27, 2018
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    I'm nervous to remove the movement from the case. I might try to find a tiny screwdriver to get the set screw from inside the case first. If that doesn't work out do I need to remove anything more than these 4 hex nuts on the corners and pull the movement straight back out of the case? ( With the hands removed first)
     
  5. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Jun 24, 2008
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    Do not remove the hex nuts. Remove the wood screws that screw into the case at each corner. You must remove the hands first.
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    That's it. Taking the movement out is the first step in just about all clock repair but don't be to quick putting it back in ... Attach the movement to a test stand, this can be as simple as a small scrap of plywood with a hole bored in it for the hand-shaft, wind it up and let it run. Only after it runs (without an issue) for 8 days or more should you start to think about putting it back in its case. These clocks will run for 11 or 12 days when/if they are in good condition. Willie X
     

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