Chester assay Mark 1835 ? John Glover London

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Travler1, Nov 17, 2019.

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  1. Travler1

    Travler1 Registered User
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    Dec 26, 2012
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    Hello to all. I’m seeking confirmation that I have the correct date on this pocket. It seems early for the dial ? The dial measures 44mm. I approximate the movement thickness at 7mm . I cannot make out the case maker stamp, Also can anyone advise me if this is Arnold’s style detent as my research shows John Glover was taken in by Arnold as an apprentice in the year 1784 ....thanks in advance John D3707574-BB60-4042-8D41-52B38649C2A2.jpeg 001E703C-8C82-4C02-9E5E-5AA4C311D551.jpeg
     
  2. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    It's an Earnshaw detent, (the spring is in compression and the escape wheel is characteristic), and the date letter is more likely to be for 1900/1901, in view of the movement and dial design, both of which suggest the end of the 19th century; you're quite right to conclude that it's not at all characteristic of 1835/6. The case maker's mark is rather obscure, but I suspect it's more due to a worn punch than rubbing, because both marks look very similar. Could it possibly be 'A.W'?

    It's said that this John Glover was apprenticed to John Roger Arnold, (the son not the father, who died in 1799), who died in 1843, but that isn't listed in the CC Masters & Apprentices. However, John Glover's father, also John, certainly was apprenticed to John Arnold in 1786, and that is listed.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  3. Travler1

    Travler1 Registered User
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    Dec 26, 2012
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    Hello Graham ...your thoughts are always appreciated. Wow I was off quite a bit with my date. I have read that the English watchmakers were resistant to change as far as implementing newer technological developments .....and I guess a key wind movement produced in 1900-1901 might be a good example ? Or was the movement produced as a tribute to the old ways as far as and especially the key winding and setting? The case maker could very well be a worn AW ...I’m at a loss with the sideways 2 mark under the date stamp. Thank u for your help ....
     
  4. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    If it is 'A.W', that's possibly for Alfred Wigley, who was associated with A.L. Dennison. The '2' is a jointer's mark, (the person who made the hinges and assembled the case parts), but the identities of these craftsmen is lost, being a private matter with the case makers and not now known.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  5. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    The English watch trade and some of its customers were extremely conservative; this wasn't a tribute, it was how they believed a pocket watch should be made, or at least that's what the trade thought. More and more customers had different ideas and were attracted to the Swiss and American products which were increasing their share of the market. By the time your watch was made, the English trade was in steep decline and wouldn't last for much longer.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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