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Chauncey Jerome O G

bajaddict

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By wikipedia's info, Chauncey Jerome had a New Haven factory between 1842 & 1845?

I got her for 15 bucks. Most of the door & all of the glass is obviously long gone. Label is in fair shape for it's age. Wood dial?

Looks like someone gave her a shot of WD-40.
 

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bajaddict

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harold bain

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Nice find, Baja. Signed dial, signed movement, proper label. Well worth restoring it.
 

bajaddict

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Nice find, Baja. Signed dial, signed movement, proper label. Well worth restoring it.
Thank you, Harold :thumb:

The lack of a door and glass is not going to be easy to overcome.....

Did I get the date about right?
 

harold bain

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I would say you are in the ballpark. Early 1840's. Wooden dials were gone by 1850ish. Give me some measurements of the inside where the door fits and I'll check a few parts clocks I have here.
 

Kevin W.

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Nice find Baja, really like the wooden dial. i have a ogee signed like yours, but not the dial. It was my second serious clock i ever bought and restored. Nice find and my lower tablet was missing.
You have a nice restoration project ahead of you.
 

bajaddict

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Nice find Baja, really like the wooden dial. i have a ogee signed like yours, but not the dial. It was my second serious clock i ever bought and restored. Nice find and my lower tablet was missing.
You have a nice restoration project ahead of you.
Thank you, Kevin :thumb:

The movement is apart and is going into the juice now :)
 

bajaddict

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I would say you are in the ballpark. Early 1840's. Wooden dials were gone by 1850ish. Give me some measurements of the inside where the door fits and I'll check a few parts clocks I have here.
I will do that, Harold :thumb:

I've got some loose veneer gluing under weights.... so when it sets up I will take some measurements ;)
 

bajaddict

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Hmmmmmm...... looks like "Mr. Walls" took her in for service at one point :)
 

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Jerome collector

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By wikipedia's info, Chauncey Jerome had a New Haven factory between 1842 & 1845?
Although Jerome purchased a defunct carriage-making factory in New Haven in 1842, he didn't actually start producing cases there until around Jan 1844. At that time, he was still making movements in Bristol. Clocks from this period tend to have Bristol-stamped movements in New Haven-labeled cases. In Apr 1845, most of Jerome's facilities in Bristol were destroyed in a fire. He transferred his operations to New Haven and began movement production there around Jun 1845. So, the earliest New Haven-labeled, New Haven-stamped clocks should date to mid-1845. One other clue of the age of your clock lies in the printer's address, which is 55 Orange St. New Haven directories show John Benham at that address from 1845-55. From research I've done on Jerome labels, I believe this is one of the earliest Benham labels from the 55 Orange St address. I'd date it to 1845.
Mike
 

bajaddict

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Although Jerome purchased a defunct carriage-making factory in New Haven in 1842, he didn't actually start producing cases there until around Jan 1844. At that time, he was still making movements in Bristol. Clocks from this period tend to have Bristol-stamped movements in New Haven-labeled cases. In Apr 1845, most of Jerome's facilities in Bristol were destroyed in a fire. He transferred his operations to New Haven and began movement production there around Jun 1845. So, the earliest New Haven-labeled, New Haven-stamped clocks should date to mid-1845. One other clue of the age of your clock lies in the printer's address, which is 55 Orange St. New Haven directories show John Benham at that address from 1845-55. From research I've done on Jerome labels, I believe this is one of the earliest Benham labels from the 55 Orange St address. I'd date it to 1845.
Mike
Thank you, kind and learned Sir :thumb:


I got very excited when I saw that someone with your particular User Name replied! Would you happen to know of the correct glass for this one? Or have a spare door lying around? Just kidding...... kind of......
 

robert5556

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Ive seen just doors on ebay sometimes with glass sometimes not.I bought an og case for around 20 pluss shipping for parts and it was well worth it because Ive used the parts on severl clocks.Still had the hardwear and the glass.Size is important.Keep looking and youll find what you want.Resurch these Jerome ogs for proper glass.There is a fellow on the east coast Ive used that has kind of a wearhouse of old american clocks for parts.At one time he had 6 sets of original Terry piller and scroll finials.Ill try and find his contact info.By the way you did quite well for 15.Its a very nice example and looks to be in nice enough shape that you dont need to do anything to it but get it to run and find a door.because its such an early ex of this kind I wouldnt do much to it.You might want to just do a hand cleaning of movement and get it runnung and wipe down the case.You dont want to shine the movement up and make it look new.That would take all these years of patina and finish off.Like Ive said before people who collect furniture dont want 160 years of finish and patina taken off.It would be like finding an original chip and dale and refinishing it.Also if Jerome coll is right your label should be tested because it may be at risk.There has been discusion on this before but in the mid 1800 labels went from rag to pulp paper.These celulose based pulp paper labels will deterorate over time and should be stabilized.By the looks of your label its probbly rag but you should test it.There are kits for testing labels.If its determined to be pulp by the acid content you can buy the cemicals to stabilize it.If this is one of the earliest ex of this label it should be texted.Id like to see it when your finish.Great find!!!!!!
 
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bajaddict

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Ive seen just doors on ebay sometimes with glass sometimes not.I bought an og case for around 20 pluss shipping for parts and it was well worth it because Ive used the parts on severl clocks.Still had the hardwear and the glass.Size is important.Keep looking and youll find what you want.Resurch these Jerome ogs for proper glass.There is a fellow on the east coast Ive used that has kind of a wearhouse of old american clocks for parts.At one time he had 6 sets of original Terry piller and scroll finials.Ill try and find his contact info.By the way you did quite well for 15.Its a very nice example and looks to be in nice enough shape that you dont need to do anything to it but get it to run and find a door.because its such an early ex of this kind I wouldnt do much to it.You might want to just do a hand cleaning of movement and get it runnung and wipe down the case.You dont want to shine the movement up and make it look new.That would take all these years of patina and finish off.Like Ive said before people who collect furniture dont want 160 years of finish and patina taken off.It would be like finding an original chip and dale and refinishing it.Also if Jerome coll is right your label should be tested because it may be at risk.There has been discusion on this before but in the mid 1800 labels went from rag to pulp paper.These celulose based pulp paper labels will deterorate over time and should be stabilized.By the looks of your label its probbly rag but you should test it.There are kits for testing labels.If its determined to be pulp by the acid content you can buy the cemicals to stabilize it.If this is one of the earliest ex of this label it should be texted.Id like to see it when your finish.Great find!!!!!!
Thanks for all the great info and advice! I will do all.... except for them movement, as I have already cleaned her in solution! The good news is that the solution was old.... and did not make her shiny bright. It did expose the dated engraving that was inside of one of the plates. At least that clock repairman had the decency to hide his I D marks..... unlike some of the other examples in the "hall of shame" that I have seen.

I will research and do the label right. I won't refinish the case or any of that stuff - she is OLD and has earned her coloring. I am just getting the loose veneer back down, slowly and carefully.

If you can dig up that contact, it would be appreciated. I would just as soon find the right door and cut some glass, rather than stick a mirror or "Regulator" decaled tablet in her. I have a neighbor that is a glazier.... and he scared me up a few pieces of wavy glass at my request.

I've got an O G door with reverse painted glass that is "tempting"..... but I don't want to "rob Peter to pay Paul" - or "Seth to pay Jerome" as is the case here :)
 

robert5556

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sounds like your on the right track.There is a way to put patina back on these type of metals but it sounds like your ok.As far as the glass Id put a period glass back in it.Like I said you can find doors with glass from time to time on ebay but you have to get your measurements right and keep looking.It might take a few months.Ive been looking for a paticular item for about 5 months and was about to go with alternative when what I needed came up on ebay and I was the only bidder.Got what I needed for 40 bucks including shipping and I would have payed upwards of 100.I might be able to find you one if you give me measurments.I hesitate to give contact info on parts man.Hes a bit of an odd ball and really doesnt advertise.some in the buiesness probbly know him.He has been collecting and selling for maybe 40 years or so.Id like to keep that bit of info to myself.If I cant find something Ill give him a call but I need those measurments.you could by a whole case on ebay and take what you need.You can get empty cases reasonable and sience you only payed 15 you have alot of room to work with.Ask Jerome collector what its worth in a private mess if he already hasent offered you something that way you know what you might be willing to spend to get it right.-Robert
 

Jerome collector

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Thank you, kind and learned Sir :thumb:


I got very excited when I saw that someone with your particular User Name replied! Would you happen to know of the correct glass for this one? Or have a spare door lying around? Just kidding...... kind of......
Sorry, no spare doors laying around. I've attached four glasses from Jerome clocks of this period (all are from 1844-46). The first three (left to right) are William Fenn tablets, and the fourth may be a Fenn, although it doesn't match any in published sources. For more on Fenn, see https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?77934-Devoted-to-William-Fenn&highlight=william+fenn. You'd never be wrong to simply put a mirror in the door. Mirrors were quite common. If you do, try to find an old one. Modern mirrors just don't look right.
 

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bajaddict

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sounds like your on the right track.There is a way to put patina back on these type of metals but it sounds like your ok.As far as the glass Id put a period glass back in it.Like I said you can find doors with glass from time to time on ebay but you have to get your measurements right and keep looking.It might take a few months.Ive been looking for a paticular item for about 5 months and was about to go with alternative when what I needed came up on ebay and I was the only bidder.Got what I needed for 40 bucks including shipping and I would have payed upwards of 100.I might be able to find you one if you give me measurments.I hesitate to give contact info on parts man.Hes a bit of an odd ball and really doesnt advertise.some in the buiesness probbly know him.He has been collecting and selling for maybe 40 years or so.Id like to keep that bit of info to myself.If I cant find something Ill give him a call but I need those measurments.you could by a whole case on ebay and take what you need.You can get empty cases reasonable and sience you only payed 15 you have alot of room to work with.Ask Jerome collector what its worth in a private mess if he already hasent offered you something that way you know what you might be willing to spend to get it right.-Robert
Thank you for all the good info! That's OK on the contact, I totally understand.....

I will get to the measurements soon. Unfortunately, my 9 - 5 has been a 16 hr / 7 day a week thing lately and is conspiring to keep me from the important things in life!
 

bajaddict

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Sorry, no spare doors laying around. I've attached four glasses from Jerome clocks of this period (all are from 1844-46). The first three (left to right) are William Fenn tablets, and the fourth may be a Fenn, although it doesn't match any in published sources. For more on Fenn, see https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?77934-Devoted-to-William-Fenn&highlight=william+fenn. You'd never be wrong to simply put a mirror in the door. Mirrors were quite common. If you do, try to find an old one. Modern mirrors just don't look right.
Those tablets are stunning!