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Centurion 35-Day Wall Clock Chiming Too Fast

devro

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Oct 27, 2015
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Forgive me for I am looking all about the internet to find out why I am experiencing this issue.

A few days ago I took in my Centurion 35-day Wall Clock to be repaired for over $100. When I was given it back I tested the chime and noticed that it was chiming noticeably fast. The person who repaired it then proceeded to tell me that it was just how the clock was made--although I have never heard a clock chime as fast as it did!

I wanted to see if there was any possible way to adjust the speed at which the clock strikes the metal whenever it is time to chime. (Sorry for my incorrect jargon)
 

lpbp

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It's possible that he changed the strike spring for one too strong, but most likely the fan governor is slipping on the shaft, if so it needs to be tightened.
 

devro

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[video]https://vid.me/nHPY[/video]

Here's a video to help with the explanation of the problem.

@lpbp Thanks for responding. I'll see if I can take it to another repair shop.
 

BigAl

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Why is it striking 3 while the hands show 9? And I agree it is too fast. The repairer should fix it.
 

R. Croswell

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It might be helpful to know why you needed to have the clock repaired and just what they did to the clock, which should be listed on the invoice. It is striking rather fast and if it normally would strike much slower, then I agree, take it back to the shop and explain the problem and have them correct it. Some clocks do strike faster than others but it should not be significantly faster after service.
 

Willie X

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Many of these clocks have a drum/friction type governor to control the strike speed. The drum is usually made of metal or plastic and the inner weights are made of metal or rubber. The parts deterioate over time and eventually fail. Best repair is to replace the old style govorner with an air vane type. This can be from another Korean donor clock, or the new vane/fly can be made up using the old pinion and arbor.
A picture would confirm what kind of governor you have there.
Willie X
 

shutterbug

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If you are familiar with the clock, and know for sure that it is striking faster than it did before, then I agree that the repairman should make it right for you.
Regarding the wrong number of strikes, the hour hand should be a friction fit hand that can just be moved to match the number of strikes, then reset the clock, waiting for each strike sequence to finish.
 

Willie X

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Most of these have a keyed hour hand with a clutch on the snail. IOW the strike should always agree with the number that the hour hand is pointed to, and the hour hand can be set independantly from the minute. Again, a picture would help.
Willie X
 

bangster

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It's a governor problem; either a slipping fan fly or (per Willy) some other kind of governor malfunctioning.

Try to post us a picture of the movement. Instructions are at the top of every forum.
 

David S

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Here is one of the crapped out rubber governor that Willie mentioned from one of the Korean movements that I had to service. It looks like perhaps the fly/ governor was put in some sort of incompatible cleaning solution. I happened to have some sheet rubber and decided to try and make a new one.

governor poor shape.jpg govenor in place.jpg

David
 

bangster

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Why in the world would they do that, instead of a fan?

By the way, devro...WELCOME TO THE MESSAGE BOARD.:cuckoo:
 

Willie X

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They also used one with 2 little copper S shaped arms with little brass weights that fling out against a thin steel drum. They may have been trying for a more uniform strike speed over the extra long wind? The later stuff used a conventional fly which seemed to work fine to me.
Willie X
 

BigAl

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The speed control on the old wind up gramophones, the ones that played wax records, used more or less the same speed control system except that the gramophone ones were adjustable. Perhaps the designers of the clocks you pictured just adapted that design to suit their needs.

Alan
 

David S

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For those that remember rotary dials. The speed of the rotary dial was governed by the same type of governor. We made millions of them.

David
 

R. Croswell

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Functionally, the big difference I see between the various centrifugal braking governors and the simple "fan" used in most clocks is that centrifugal brakes apply no load and have no effect at all until a certain speed is attained where the "fan" always applies some resistance which increases as the speed increases. One would assume that a clock with a centrifugal governor would strike at a more constant rate as the spring unwinds. There may be a small space savings as well with the centrifugal brake as no space has to be provided for the revolving fan. It still seems illogical to me that a mechanical governor would be used is movements where the over all design and quality suggest that cost of manufacture was likely a major consideration. The friction surface would also seem more subject to wear; not much about a fan blade to wear.

Yes, the basic black rotary dial phone. A most reliable device. Basic functionality and durability from a time when life was less complicated and phones had cords and people were in less of a hurry.
 

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