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Case Identification Help PLEASE

DTSPatrick

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Jul 9, 2020
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I’m not too familiar with European market pocket watch cases. Does anybody know the maker “LT” or “TH”? I’m not even sure if that is the maker.

“18” is stamped. Is this case 18k? Can you help identify the hallmarks? Thank you.

76731284-10FD-43FE-9057-8F81ECAED9DF.jpeg
 

Ethan Lipsig

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I am no expert, but the stampings do not look like genuine U.K. hallmarks. So one possibility is this (see English silver hallmarks: British maker's marks identification LC-LZ):


L.T and English pseudo-hallmarks mark, Lawrence Twentyman, Cape Colony 1830 c.

L.T and English pseudo-hallmarks
Lawrence Holme Twentyman,
a Cape of Good Hope Colony silversmith. Born on 5 May 1793 in Liverpool, he was the son of John Middleton Twentyman and Phoebe Holme. After an apprenticeship as a clock and watchmaker he arrived at the Cape on 12 June 1818. In 1821 he married Betsy Burrell. He left the Cape in 1832 returning for short periods in 1835, 1837, 1844 and in 1846. The firm was described as Twentyman & Co (1832) and Twentyman and Warner (1842-1844) continuing the trade under various styles until 1887 but no mention of watchmaking or silversmithing activity is known after 1837.
Cape Colony 1830 c. hallmark


Another possibility is with respect to the T. H below the serial number. See English silver hallmarks: British maker's marks identification TH-TN for possible matches.
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gmorse

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Hi DTSPatrick,
...the stampings do not look like genuine U.K. hallmarks.
Ethan is quite right, these aren't genuine at all, they are very similar to others seen from time to time on what are probably US-made cases. The horse's head is unknown in English marks, and the 'T.H' may have been intended to suggest Thomas Helsby, a well-known Liverpool case maker whose mark would have been familiar to many in the US at the time.

Regards,

Graham
 
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DTSPatrick

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Thanks Ethan and Graham for the knowledge. I couldn't make out the right hallmark (looks like a potted plant to me) and couldn't find the horse head in any guide -- so thank you for confirming as non-genuine.
 

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