cannon pinion removal / how do YOU do it

bkerr

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Nov 29, 2007
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I have been away for quite some time and recently have had some time to go through the MB. I have quite a few German movements that I have replaced or rebuilt. One problem that I have come up against is removing the cannon pinion. On some movements it is very hard to reassemble without first removing the center shaft from the front plate. One movement that I got in a bucket was completely apart with three broken pivots and two bent pivots as a result of trying to work around the center shaft. I read through the messages and there seems to be a few different approaches. I have used a arbor press, that worked but very scary when it finally POPPED!. I used my jewelers torch (Smith) and put some heat on it, that worked okay. Needed to polish out the bluing on the center shaft. I have not tried a "special tool" or paint can lid tools. I read where some put red loctite on the cannon to keep it from slipping when assembling. That would be fun to try to press off? Anyway just looking for any other ideas that might be out there.
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bkerr

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I agree that taking it off is not the usual for me either but, I have had two recently that it was much easier to assemble with the center shaft off. I agree that is it not common to have to bush the plate. I am thinking about making a set of wedges much like removing an arbor from a chuck (Jacobs style) that might work? Thanks
 

shutterbug

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A little heat really makes it much easier to remove. Some have made a couple of knife edged wedges to drive it off with. It's important to have equal pressure on each side so you don't bend the arbor.
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Came across this thread while looking for the proper technique to press the pinion back on the center shaft without going to far so I end up with the proper end shake.
Thank you,
James
 

R. Croswell

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Most of the time the movement will come apart with the pinion in place, although it may disarrange the remaining parts in the process. I assume we are talking about removing the pinion after the front plate has been separated from the rest of the movement. Support the plate as close as possible to the center arbor. I find a split stake works, or I suppose a crow's foot, or two steel bars. I always apply heat with a butane torch for a few seconds then, with the plate supported, tap the end of the arbor with a brass or plastic hammer. If the end is threaded, screw on the nut until the tip of the threads is flush with the nut - gently so not to bend the threaded part. If it is stubborn, use a brass rod drilled to slip over the threads and drive the thick part of the arbor. Application of Aerokroil the day before may also help, but with heat, these usually come off easily. Hint, heat the pinion before reinstalling and it will take less force to push it home.

RC
 
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James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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Most of the time the movement will come apart with the pinion in place, although it may disarrange the remaining parts in the process. I assume we are talking about removing the pinion after the front plate has been separated from the rest of the movement. Support the plate as close as possible to the center arbor. I find a split stake works, or I suppose a crow's foot, or two steel bars. I always apply heat with a butane torch for a few seconds then, with the plate supported, tap the end of the arbor with a brass or plastic hammer. If the end is threaded, screw on the nut until the tip of the threads is flush with the nut - gently so not to bend the threaded part. If it is stubborn, use a brass rod drilled to slip over the threads and drive the thick part of the arbor. Application of Aerokroil the day before may also help, but with heat, these usually come off easily. Hint, heat the pinion before reinstalling and it will take less force to push it home.

RC
RC... The pinion had to be removed in order to separate the plates. Now I have everything back together and need to install the pinion without pressing it on too far and eliminating the center shaft end shake. Do I put a shim between the pinion and front plate and, if so, how thick?

James
 

R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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RC... The pinion had to be removed in order to separate the plates. Now I have everything back together and need to install the pinion without pressing it on too far and eliminating the center shaft end shake. Do I put a shim between the pinion and front plate and, if so, how thick?

James
You want to be careful not to bend the back plate. Try to support the back end of the arbor on a wood block and use a shim under the pinion.

RC
 

James Lucas

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Aug 25, 2020
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.02” is enough, perhaps too much. Make sure the pinion lines up with the gear it turns. The spacing isn’t critical as long as there is some and the gears line up.

RC
Thank you again..
James
 

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