Can you use a different style of click spring?

R_Fry

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Sep 6, 2020
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This is the works in question. Somehow the click spring broke (I'm not sure if that can even happen organically?), the broken half was in the bottom of the clock. I have a picture of the spring separately, but I cannot seem to find this exact sort of spring in the correct size. Could I substitute a different type of click spring?

IMG_9963.JPG IMG_9953.JPG
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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This is the works in question. Somehow the click spring broke (I'm not sure if that can even happen organically?), the broken half was in the bottom of the clock. I have a picture of the spring separately, but I cannot seem to find this exact sort of spring in the correct size. Could I substitute a different type of click spring?

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You can substitute but you can make one if you have an old thick mainspring to cut it out of. A grinder can be used to get the basic shape and files for the finish.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Sure, there are many good click spring arrangements. The flat type with a single screw and a locking tab can often be used.

Note, that clock has clicks and click wheels made of soft steel. The parts are stamped and don't have a good shape even when new. So, your clock has probably suffered several winding incidents and the last one broke the click spring. Point being ... to check closely and clean up any ill shaped click wheel teeth and also check the click for damage.

Willie X
 

Dick Feldman

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There has been a rather long and comprehensive discussion of Asian clocks in this thread: https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/31-day-korean-clock-chime.178717/
If one click assembly has failed, the other is likely due for failure as well since most clock trains have been wound the same number of times. Both trains/click assemblies have been subjected to the same circumstances. I would say the clock you are working on generally has been made with inferior materials throughout ie. Light gauge and inferior quality metal in the plates, clicks, click return springs, ratchet gears, arbors.
Any repair will leave potential hazards to anyone winding the clock in the future.
JMHO
Dick
 

Rod Schaffter

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Mar 20, 2020
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I had that exact movement and the time click also broke in the same spot. I picked up a junk movement on eBay and swapped out the front plate.

In retrospect, I should have put in a Hermle movement and replaced the face to accommodate the different hole spacing......
 

Willie X

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Really crappy movement there, what DF said.

Replacing both click wheels and both click springs would be a good Idea.
Also, I never liked to see a click spring working against the action of the click.
By all means change them to work with the clicks. A double end click spring is a cost cutting measure and, in this case, not something I would want to replicate.

Willie X
 

Dick Feldman

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Once you replace the clicks, return springs and ratchet wheels most of the threat of imminent danger will be gone.
Then you will only have to be concerned with the rest of the movement that has poor design, poor quality materials and light gauge metals.
Is that movement worth spending a lot of time on?
JMHO
Dick
 

wow

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What I don’t like about the replacement clicks supplied now is their thickness. They are about half as thick as the original, thus, weaker, right? I end up making many of the American click replacements I do. Is there anybody out there that supplies thick, strong clicks with good springs and rivets?
 

R. Croswell

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It looks like the ratchet wheels are digging into the already thin plate. Probably burrs on the back side of the click wheel. As for the click spring, I believe someone mentioned cutting a new one from a piece of an old clock main spring. That would also be my recommendation although www.timesavers.com has a number of replacement click springs that are held by a single screw and tab. This would require drilling and taping a hole for the screw and a hole for the tab.

RC
 

R. Croswell

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What I don’t like about the replacement clicks supplied now is their thickness. They are about half as thick as the original, thus, weaker, right? I end up making many of the American click replacements I do. Is there anybody out there that supplies thick, strong clicks with good springs and rivets?
These; Timesavers from timesavers are thick and have steel click springs and come with steel rivets. They do not resemble any American clicks and are somewhat ugly. The rivets usually do not fit the existing hole, and spring wire is very heavy so it most be formed so as not to put excessive pressure on the click. Too strong of a click spring can wreck a brass click wheel over time.

Here is one on a Sessions main wheel that has a steel click wheel. I made the rivet because the one supplied didn't fit the hole in the main wheel. One of these could be adapted to the OP's movement but that would not be the preferred option.

RC

heavy click.jpg
 

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