Murday Can someone tell me anything about this clock? Murday type?

hobologist

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Jan 14, 2009
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Hi,
I purchased this battery clock off ebay for $80, I think it looks interesting and definitely worth restoring.
I can't find much info on it other than it looks similar to the Murday design Reason clock?
The only markings I can see is a serial number of 338.
I would like to know who made it, what the case would have looked like and what voltage batteries it requires.
Any information at all would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Ross Crichton
 

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hobologist

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Jan 14, 2009
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Thanks for the link Frank,
There's a lot of clocks to look through there, I didn't realize there was so much variety in electric clocks.
 

Typ1-2-3

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Oct 13, 2010
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Yes. I am collecting an restauring electrical clocks for home rooms at the time of development up to WWII. It is a very interesting hobby, because the early clocks are technical unique. Every maker has another ideas!

Frank
 

eskmill

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The photos provided by hobologist suggests the un-named maker attempted to replicate the Murday clock. The dangling toggle on the periphery of the wheel and the crude toggle block on the contact strap shares the Hipp Toggle principle used by Murday.

Whether or not the maker was successful cannot be determined from the photos. The green silk covered winding on the electromagnet suggests an older fabrication before enamel covered copper wire became useful for electromagnets. The required voltage would have to be determined experimentally, not knowing the characteristics of the electromagnet which may have been salvaged from some scrapped telegraphic device.

The tangled balance spring attests to curious handling.
 

Chris. Sealy

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Nov 25, 2009
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Hi. I've only just noticed this thread. I own clock number 334. The motion works on the square plates at the top, are exactly the same, although yours is completely out of adjustment. Mine has two solenoids, which attract an armature, to mechanically impulse the balance wheel. Yours appears to impulse the wheel electro-magnetically via the iron pieces hanging below the wheel. Could this have been a prototype model, for the next generation, or just a clever amateurs idea? Did you get it to work? All the best. Chris.
 

hobologist

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Thanks Chris, That is interesting to know there is another one. If you can find the time, could you post a few photos of yours because I'd love to see it. I did get mine all cleaned up and polished but maybe I just haven't got the timing of the impulse right because the hanging bars get attracted to the magnet and stops there. I lost a bit of interest when I realised it may have been made by a hobbyist. some parts of it seem to be made to a very high standard then other parts are less well made. Ross
 

Chris. Sealy

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Nov 25, 2009
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Hi Ross. I'm home again, and I've taken some pictures of my Murday.
I've studied your pictures again. You mention that the hanging bars get attracted to the magnet, and then stop. I believe that this is because unlike my clock; the timing of the 'switch off' point is the important factor.
You will need to adjust the Hipp toggle to switch off, just before the point at which the hanging bars currently stop. Please let me know if this works. Chris.

100_2129.jpg 100_2130.jpg 100_2132.jpg 100_2133.jpg 100_2139.jpg
 

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hobologist

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Jan 14, 2009
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Hi Chris, Thanks for uploading the photos of your clock, it is nice to see one so similar to mine and in such nice condition too. I will have another play with the timing of the impulse, and I probably also need to find the correct voltage for best results also. I did find that the the toggle doesn't pass the current through the hinge very well which may also be part of the problem. Sometime soon I'll have another crack at it and see if I can get it to keep going.
Thanks again,
Ross
 

Chris. Sealy

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Hi Ross. Glad you liked the photos. Your clocks solenoid looks to have similar dimensions to mine. My two solenoids are connected in parallel, and run on three 1.5 volt 'D' cells connected in series, giving a nominal 4.5 volts. This works very well; lasting for well over 12 months. You mention that the current does'nt pass through the hinge very well. In fact, the part of the toggle attached to the springy contact should be insulated from it. When this part is pushed down by the hinged part, the current should flow from the springy contact to the lower adjustable contact. I'm looking forward to seeing it working on Youtube. Chris.
 

hobologist

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Jan 14, 2009
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Thanks Chris, Your last message was a huge help to me. I didn't realise that the springy thing was contacts that were pushed closed by the toggle, and I really didn't understand how it was supposed to work.
It has now been working off & on for a while but I need to get a battery holder for 4.5 volts like you suggest as 3volt is too weak and 6 volts pushes too far. There seems to be a lot of adjustments that need to be made to get everything just right, but hopefully it won't be too long before it is working properly again.
Ross
 
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