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Can broken chime rods be fixed with metal-to-metal epoxy?

Smiloid

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I am curious, but can broken chime rods (those that broke off their screws) be fixed by using a metal-to-metal epoxy? No heat is involved, but the parts would need to be clamped in place for a good period of time. Would the tone be affected if any? Use of heat is out of the question, as it spoils the rods. If this works, it could preserve the original tone of my Vedette clock's original chime rods. The issue is, if the bond settles and cures, and the rods do not lose their proper tone, will the repaired rods be able to handle being hit by the clock hammers? I'd be testing them on an empty block and tap them with a small screw driver to check their tones.

The problem is that only one of the original screws from these rods remains. Two were destroyed, and one went missing.
 

Smiloid

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In other words, there's no way to fix the rods at all without affecting their tone. Then there's no point in being obsessed about wanting to fix them. It will just have to end. Unless I can find duplicates of those rods, I might as well live with the ones in there.
 

wow

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The rods will need to be replaced. Once they break off re-inserting them will not work. They will be out of tune if reused. Longer rods may be screwed in and tuned to match the original pitch. What chime is in your clock? Is it Westminster, bim-bam, or what?
 

Smiloid

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They are Westminster. The longest rod used in that tune was 9 1/2 inches long including the screw. Are there any sets out there with that rod this length?
 

wow

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Getting another rod that exact length will not necessarily work. It may not be tuned to the same pitch. A longer rod will sound a lower pitch usually. It has to be cut or ground shorter till it is tuned to the needed pitch. You can buy a complete set that is tuned and screw them in but the old ones will have to be unscrewed which is often difficult. They are usually very tight. I could replace your rod and tune it but you would have to remove the block and send it to me. Send me a private message if you are interested.
 
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Smiloid

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All of the original rods are broken. I already have five rods in the chime block being used. I no longer remember the tone of the original rods. The ones in there now have a nice pitch as is. I would have to find out the tone of the originals.
 

wow

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The Westminster tune can be tuned to any musical key. You will need to get someone with a musical background to help you tune your rods or just order a complete new set of Westminster rods. If you can remove your old rods and the screws of the broken ones, the easiest way for you to fix it is to order them and screw them in. Does your chime block have two rows of rods side by side or one set in one row? Knowing that will help.
 

shutterbug

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If the current set is in tune and sounding good, that's all you need. It doesn't need to sound exactly like it did before ... just in tune.
 

Smiloid

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Question after over a year. Have any of you ever heard of Thermo-Trap Putty? Anyways, I managed to find a set of antique French Westminster chime rods on eBay, almost the exact same length as the originals. Planning on seeing how they sound and if I like them I will use them.

I know that brazing the broken rods back onto their screws is not recommended as it will ruin the tone. If a lot of Thermo-Trap putty gets applied, more than enough to block heat transfer to the rods except at the very tip needing brazing, will the tone still change if the rod ends up not conducting much heat? A lot of putty would be needed to protect it, wouldn't it? I think using too much is better than too little. More than enough should be used to prevent the rod from being heated anywhere but the contact area where the brazing is happening. Almost all of the tapered area should be covered as well as the remaining length of the rod.

I can't use the rods as they are anyways and will have at least two good sounding sets. I've got nothing to lose. But if by some miracle the original rods keep their tone, I will post about it. However, even if successful, a substitute rod will have to be used in place of the original fifth rod. It was missing when I first got the clock the rods belonged to. If the rods end up only the slightest bit out of tune, I can send them to ChimeClockFan to correct the pitch.
 
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shutterbug

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I think you would have to alter the taper either way. Lets see if chimeclockfan can add any info for you.
 

J. A. Olson

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I have never found any success with repairing chime rods with solder or epoxy. The reason is because this doesn't do anything to amend the broken point, it just seals around where the rod fractured without doing anything to restore internal structural integrity. Rods are normally punched through the brass screw head up to where the slotted end begins and are tapered down on a lathe or similar apparatus. Rods with a longer neck vibrate more profusely compared to rods with a thicker or shorter neck. They must have some form of taper to resonate effectively. Thicker diameter rods have a sharper blow and quieter hum while thinner diameter rods have a longer hum and softer blow.

Send photos of the clock + chime rods and I'll evaluate what must be done if all else fails. These French clocks tend to have nice chimes but the rods are prone to breakage if they've rusted or were not secured in transit. Normally they use bronze or steel rods. Bronze rods are notorious for vibrating around considerately at the slightest provocation.
 

Smiloid

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I am also sure that protecting the rod with Thermo-Trap Putty and brazing the break surfaces of the rods to the adjacent part of the screw won't work, right? Is it possible to fill in the break point? I have my doubts. What about drilling 4-5mm into the screw stub, machining the taper that amount to a size the tiniest bit bigger than the hole, friction fitting the rod into the screw stub and redoing the taper to lower the tone back to the correct note?
 

Willie X

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The last mentioned approach will work and I've done it many times. BUT, you will have to retune all the other rods. :( So, this route can end up being very labor intensive.

And, I really hate any labor that's intensive!

It's much better to replace and tune one new rod, or better still, replace the whole set if possible.

My 2, Willie X
 
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wow

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I am also sure that protecting the rod with Thermo-Trap Putty and brazing the break surfaces of the rods to the adjacent part of the screw won't work, right? Is it possible to fill in the break point? I have my doubts. What about drilling 4-5mm into the screw stub, machining the taper that amount to a size the tiniest bit bigger than the hole, friction fitting the rod into the screw stub and redoing the taper to lower the tone back to the correct note?
Tapering the rod only changes the pitch very slightly. Probably not enough to lower the pitch enough. You may be successful using a different longer rod and cutting it off a little bit at a time raising the pitch to the one needed. If it’s too high in pitch, you can’t lower it enough in most cases. You can easily raise the pitch by shortening the rod.
 

Smiloid

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Maybe I could have ChimeClockFan tune a new set of rods the same length as the originals out of the same material and have them match the dimensions of them where they stick out? May be the best option. I sent him a message already, so I will just wait for him to reply. An exact replica of the originals would solve everything.

One other thought came to my mind just now: What about brazing the screw stub enough to partially melt the area the rod broke off of and making it join with the rod, with the rod greatly protected from heat except having the very edge of the taper exposed to join with the screw? I am thinking the tone still might change, but as to how much I cannot say. I would have Thermo-Trap Putty cover all of the rod enough to prevent heat from affecting the rod and have the putty flush with the broken end. Would the screw end up getting attached to the rod again, would the rods have either a different tone or get spoiled, or would the original tone return? (The last of these outcomes isn't likely, and would be a miracle if it happened.)
 
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wow

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If I am very careful, could I sand down the rods I bought until their tone matches that of the original rods? Just curious. Although it might be best to leave them alone. I paid $43 for them. Maybe I could have ChimeClockFan tune a new set of rods the same length as the originals out of brass. May be the best option. I sent him a message already, so I will just wait for him to reply.
Two rods that are exactly the same length may not have the same pitch. If you bought a set of tuned Westminster rods, they should be fine. They may not match the exact pitches of the original rods, but that is ok. Sets of rods are tuned in different keys so they will fit the case they are being put in. Letting CCF tune the new set is not necessary. Maybe he would be willing to re-tune the old set to a new key and you would have a spare set of rods.
 

Smiloid

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Two rods that are exactly the same length may not have the same pitch. If you bought a set of tuned Westminster rods, they should be fine. They may not match the exact pitches of the original rods, but that is ok. Sets of rods are tuned in different keys so they will fit the case they are being put in. Letting CCF tune the new set is not necessary. Maybe he would be willing to re-tune the old set to a new key and you would have a spare set of rods.
Yes, that is true that he could. What are the chances of getting the old key of the old rods back? Certainly that would be more difficult to do. Would it be possible to braze a new section of brass rod to the existing rod on the non-tapered end? Of course, I would not do this without giving the rod heat protection.

I do have to mention that I have somehow gotten a weak note out of the original rods while tightly sandwiching the ends of the tapers between two iron blocks and tapping the tapers. Maybe if I could record that and send it to CCF, maybe he could tune the new ones to that? It isn't exactly easy for me to pull off, but might work for him if he can hear the tone.
 
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Willie X

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Sanding would take a really long time!

Usually I file the neck, to match the other rods using a flat file. Then, assuming the rod is way to long, snip off small lengths at the end with a sprue cutter, or a small bolt cutter. When you start to get close to the right pitch, use the ole bench grinder, very gradually, until you get almost there. Then use a hand stone, or super light touches with the grinder, to bring it on home.

Try your very best NOT to overshoot the mark! You can go back a bit, by fileing the neck, but only about 1/4 tone (max) and this will make the neck weaker.

I use a Korg chromatic tuner but still have problems at times. Rods just ain't like strings ...

Willie X
 
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wow

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Yes, that is true that he could. What are the chances of getting the old key of the old rods back? Certainly that would be more difficult to do. Would it be possible to braze a new section of brass rod to the existing rod on the non-tapered end? Of course, I would not do this without giving the rod heat protection.

I do have to mention that I have somehow gotten a weak note out of the original rods while tightly sandwiching the ends of the tapers between two iron blocks and tapping the tapers. Maybe if I could record that and send it to CCF, maybe he could tune the new ones to that? It isn't exactly easy for me to pull off, but might work for him if he can hear the tone.
Why do you want the original key?
 

Smiloid

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Why do you want the original key?
Perhaps I am being obsessive. I already have a set of good sounding rods in the clock right now, although their pitch is slightly higher than the originals were or might be the same. (I'd have to check.)

I am not comfortable with shortening the rods I just got and altering their pitch. Doing so would be a waste of the $43 I spent on them, right? I'd rather not do that if I feel I will mess them up.

What will happen if the screw stub's center part is heated enough to partially melt it? Will it meld with the tapered end of the rod where it broke off? How well will this work if the rod is covered in enough material to protect its structural integrity from heat like this? Will the screw not attach to the rod?
 
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wow

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Perhaps I am being obsessive. I already have a set of good sounding rods in the clock right now, although their pitch is slightly higher than the originals were or might be the same. (I'd have to check.)

I am not comfortable with shortening the rods I just got and altering their pitch. Doing so would be a waste of the $43 I spent on them, right? I'd rather not do that if I feel I will mess them up.

What will happen if the screw stub's center part is heated enough to partially melt it? Will it meld with the tapered end of the rod where it broke off? How well will this work if the rod is covered in enough material to protect its structural integrity from heat like this? Will the screw not attach to the rod?
Maybe I’m not obsessive enough but I would use the new set you already bought and leave the rest alone. As Willie said, it is labor intensive and, in my opinion, not worth the time and the additional expense of farming work out. My 2.
 
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shutterbug

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Trying to fix a broken chime rod is usually an exercise in futility. Your best option for success is to drill and tap the block (if needed) and put in a set of tuned rods. Considering the time wasted in attempting to fix what's unfixable, you'll be money ahead.
 

Smiloid

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I do have one question, since I am going to have Chimeclockfan tune a new set of rods for me.

What metal are these rods made from? They can't be copper because they're not red tinted. Are they brass or bronze? They've got a patina on the non-tapered end, but the tapered ends have their gleam which should give a clue. I also used my phone to create videos so that Chimeclockfan can hear their tone. It was tricky to pull off but I managed to do it.

IMG_8711.jpg IMG_8713.jpg
 

J. A. Olson

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Older rods were sometimes a bronze alloy. Modern rods are a beryllium copper alloy and look identical to what you have.
 

Smiloid

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Older rods were sometimes a bronze alloy. Modern rods are a beryllium copper alloy and look identical to what you have.
The clock these rods came from was made in the 1930s. It is quite old. The clock is capable of running quite well. Several years ago it was overhauled and I had to get a bigger pendulum bob to keep it running more accurately.
 

J. A. Olson

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The German gong foundries used a versatile range of iron, steel, bronze, and copper alloys to suit any clientele. In my work it was discovered that different techniques can be applied to alter how the rods sound regardless of which alloy is used. As beryllium copper rods are being made, techniques were devised to make them match any required sound. This also reduces costs and resource usage, which would skyrocket if we were to look into doing several different alloys and construction methods.

The French gong industry is an obscurity with a study in progress looking into how many French firms actually made their own gongs versus leasing them out to the German foundries.
 

Smiloid

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I have another question. Will cold spoil chime rods? Will putting them in the freezer make them contract? I think it might increase their brittleness temporarily. Just a curiosity.
 

J. A. Olson

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Extreme heat or cold will have an adverse affect on rods and coils, and can lead to irreparable damage.
 

Smiloid

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I guess there's no point in doing that then. I would not want the rod to crack.

Is it possible at all to get a broken chime rod into a screw that had a hole drilled out that was the same size as the rod's tapered end? What if I heated the screw just enough to allow the rod to get in with a friction fit?
 
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J. A. Olson

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If you successfully insert a broken rod into a screw with hole drilled out, you'll have to re-taper the rod's captive neck. It still isn't guaranteed to give great results since the tapered end is not guaranteed to fit snug inside a cylindrical hole.
 

Smiloid

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If you successfully insert a broken rod into a screw with hole drilled out, you'll have to re-taper the rod's captive neck. It still isn't guaranteed to give great results since the tapered end is not guaranteed to fit snug inside a cylindrical hole.
Thanks for the advice.
 
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RJSoftware

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On my todo list.

Attempt redneck chimerod weld by clamping rod and threaded portion to car battery.

Seems like a maybe. The amperage required might be small since tapered end where rod connects threaded insert is small contact point.

This is all to common a problem.

I think a jig of wood held in bench vice. Threaded part makes contact with bench vice metal, Thin stips of wood separate chime rod electrically from contact with vice. Vice holds pieces in place for weld. Cable connects to free end of chime rod + and vice gets (-). Switch is contact with battery terminal.

A few quick taps. Nothing lengthy. Just enough to stick. It might be good to drill a small hole and friction fit the tapered end first.

Like a tak weld.
 

RJSoftware

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I guess there's no point in doing that then. I would not want the rod to crack.

Is it possible at all to get a broken chime rod into a screw that had a hole drilled out that was the same size as the rod's tapered end? What if I heated the screw just enough to allow the rod to get in with a friction fit?
no need to heat, flatten with file the threaded portion then use carbide bit. It'll go in like butter.

The micro carbide bits found on ebay and sometimes flea market tool vendors are really cheap and can do the job. I say this because some charge ridiculous price. Shop first.

The micro carbide bits have standard dremel tool sized shanks. I want to say 1/8 inch I think.
 
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Smiloid

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I have never found any success with repairing chime rods with solder or epoxy. The reason is because this doesn't do anything to amend the broken point, it just seals around where the rod fractured without doing anything to restore internal structural integrity. Rods are normally punched through the brass screw head up to where the slotted end begins and are tapered down on a lathe or similar apparatus. Rods with a longer neck vibrate more profusely compared to rods with a thicker or shorter neck. They must have some form of taper to resonate effectively. Thicker diameter rods have a sharper blow and quieter hum while thinner diameter rods have a longer hum and softer blow.

Send photos of the clock + chime rods and I'll evaluate what must be done if all else fails. These French clocks tend to have nice chimes but the rods are prone to breakage if they've rusted or were not secured in transit. Normally they use bronze or steel rods. Bronze rods are notorious for vibrating around considerately at the slightest provocation.
chimeclockfan,

What you said means that soldering won't work even if applied to the break surfaces, correct? I thought so but I want to be sure.
 
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wow

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chimeclockfan,

What you said means that soldering won't work even if applied to the break surfaces, correct?
Probably the only way you could join two pieces of a broken steel rod and get the strength needed and the possibility of getting a sound that replicates the sound produced before the rod was broken is to weld them together. The joint would have to be ground and shaped exactly like the original. The pitch may be exact, but maybe not. Solder is too soft and will change the strength at the joint and will dull the sound of the chiming rod. All other alloys like brass, bronze, etc would be impossible to solder and produce the original tone quality or pitch also. IMHO
 

Smiloid

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Probably the only way you could join two pieces of a broken steel rod and get the strength needed and the possibility of getting a sound that replicates the sound produced before the rod was broken is to weld them together. The joint would have to be ground and shaped exactly like the original. The pitch may be exact, but maybe not. Solder is too soft and will change the strength at the joint and will dull the sound of the chiming rod. All other alloys like brass, bronze, etc would be impossible to solder and produce the original tone quality or pitch also. IMHO
Edit: Chimeclockfan said that there's no way to successfully repair broken bronze or copper rods. I removed my original reply as a result. The only way to know for sure is to find out if their tone was lower than what I recorded a few days ago.
 
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Smiloid

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This is currently how my clock sounds. As Chimeclockfan said, it sounds very nice as it is. Out of the vintage rods I purchased, these were the ones that came closest to the originals in sound.
 

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Smiloid

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There is one question I do want to ask: I managed to get a sound out of the broken rods, still weak but not totally dead. (IMG_8695 has the tone from the longest of the four rods.) I have truly no idea what the original tone was, but would the key I have gotten possibly be higher than what the original was? I sandwiched the ends of the tapers between the two halves of my Vinyl Flat, which is normally used for flattening warped vinyl records. (I had to tighten the wingnut as far as I could.) I had the rods inserted 2mm in approximately; any less and the rods would fall out. This was the lowest tone I was able to get out of them. Can anybody listen to "IMG_8695" and tell me if the key would have been lower than this or the same when the rod was fully intact? I hit the rods with a large flathead screwdriver at the tapered ends, not too hard and not too gently. It might give me an idea of what the rods originally sounded like if a definite answer can be given.

You might want to use your phones and put them up to your ears. On my computer I had to really raise the volume.
 

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Micam100

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On a German grandfather clock with two broken (steel) rods on the strike side, I repaired them in this way, and it should be applicable to brass or bronze.

Drive out the broken plug in the brass screw.

In a lathe, cut off the tapered section and reform the plug and taper to original dimensions.

You now have a rod that is much shorter than the original, in my case, 55 mm (45mm taper and 10mm of plug).

On the other end, weld (or braze if brass) 55mm plus of the same or similar material. Clean up the weld and polish the rod (blue it, if it is a steel rod that was previously blued).

Drive the brass screw back onto the rod with bearing/shaft Locktite.

Tune the rod by carefully shortening it to suit.

A couple of things to note.

  • I believe the length, mass and taper of the rod are the important criteria that determine how the note sounds and sustains. The small portion you weld on is restoring the length and mass, and the rod is not going to notice if that small piece is not metallurgically identical. A good, full depth weld is essential.
  • To drive the slug out of the brass screw, first open up the screw slot with a Dremel burr or endmill, before drilling. Drill just deep enough to reach the slug. The drill must be smaller than the slug diameter so that there is a shoulder left in the screw for the repaired rod to stop against.
  • To heat blue long steel chime rods with a flame. It's difficult to heat evenly if the rod is stationery so, chuck the slug end in a drill, held in a vice so the rod is horizontal. The drill trigger should press on the vice sliding jaw so that the drill turns slowly. Start at the far end of the rod, keep the flame moving, not too close to the rod. The slug end in the drill won't get hot enough to blue but it's not going to be seen.
Michael
1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg 5.jpg 7.jpg 8.jpg 9.jpg 10.jpg
 

wow

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On a German grandfather clock with two broken (steel) rods on the strike side, I repaired them in this way, and it should be applicable to brass or bronze.

Drive out the broken plug in the brass screw.

In a lathe, cut off the tapered section and reform the plug and taper to original dimensions.

You now have a rod that is much shorter than the original, in my case, 55 mm (45mm taper and 10mm of plug).

On the other end, weld (or braze if brass) 55mm plus of the same or similar material. Clean up the weld and polish the rod (blue it, if it is a steel rod that was previously blued).

Drive the brass screw back onto the rod with bearing/shaft Locktite.

Tune the rod by carefully shortening it to suit.

A couple of things to note.

  • I believe the length, mass and taper of the rod are the important criteria that determine how the note sounds and sustains. The small portion you weld on is restoring the length and mass, and the rod is not going to notice if that small piece is not metallurgically identical. A good, full depth weld is essential.
  • To drive the slug out of the brass screw, first open up the screw slot with a Dremel burr or endmill, before drilling. Drill just deep enough to reach the slug. The drill must be smaller than the slug diameter so that there is a shoulder left in the screw for the repaired rod to stop against.
  • To heat blue long steel chime rods with a flame. It's difficult to heat evenly if the rod is stationery so, chuck the slug end in a drill, held in a vice so the rod is horizontal. The drill trigger should press on the vice sliding jaw so that the drill turns slowly. Start at the far end of the rod, keep the flame moving, not too close to the rod. The slug end in the drill won't get hot enough to blue but it's not going to be seen.
Michael
View attachment 677975 View attachment 677976 View attachment 677977 View attachment 677978 View attachment 677979 View attachment 677980 View attachment 677981 View attachment 677982 View attachment 677983
Great info and illustrations, Michael. This is the only way to accomplish the task of getting original rods repaired and tuned to the original pitch. It is very time consuming and may or may not always be successful. I always opt for replacing the rod with another longer new or used rod and tuning it or just purchasing a tuned set. As CCF has stated, older rods are made of different alloys than the new ones available from suppliers so the pitch may be the same but the tone (richness) is often not exactly the same as the original.
My 2 cents
Will
 

Smiloid

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On a German grandfather clock with two broken (steel) rods on the strike side, I repaired them in this way, and it should be applicable to brass or bronze.

Drive out the broken plug in the brass screw.

In a lathe, cut off the tapered section and reform the plug and taper to original dimensions.

You now have a rod that is much shorter than the original, in my case, 55 mm (45mm taper and 10mm of plug).

On the other end, weld (or braze if brass) 55mm plus of the same or similar material. Clean up the weld and polish the rod (blue it, if it is a steel rod that was previously blued).

Drive the brass screw back onto the rod with bearing/shaft Locktite.

Tune the rod by carefully shortening it to suit.

A couple of things to note.

  • I believe the length, mass and taper of the rod are the important criteria that determine how the note sounds and sustains. The small portion you weld on is restoring the length and mass, and the rod is not going to notice if that small piece is not metallurgically identical. A good, full depth weld is essential.
  • To drive the slug out of the brass screw, first open up the screw slot with a Dremel burr or endmill, before drilling. Drill just deep enough to reach the slug. The drill must be smaller than the slug diameter so that there is a shoulder left in the screw for the repaired rod to stop against.
  • To heat blue long steel chime rods with a flame. It's difficult to heat evenly if the rod is stationery so, chuck the slug end in a drill, held in a vice so the rod is horizontal. The drill trigger should press on the vice sliding jaw so that the drill turns slowly. Start at the far end of the rod, keep the flame moving, not too close to the rod. The slug end in the drill won't get hot enough to blue but it's not going to be seen.
Michael
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Can you repair my chime rods this way if I send them to you? The tapers and their flats will need to be remade along with brazing the same amount of the same alloy back on the other side, and two of the screws need to be remade due to the originals having been drilled out. The fifth rod is long missing and would have to be made anew.

The original rods had screws that fit better in the clock’s iron gong base the best, but I would need an impact driver to get them in.
 
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Micam100

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Nov 11, 2019
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Can you repair my chime rods this way if I send them to you? The tapers and their flats will need to be remade along with brazing the same amount of the same alloy back on the other side, and two of the screws need to be remade due to the originals having been drilled out. The fifth rod is long missing and would have to be made anew.

The original rods had screws that fit better in the clock’s iron gong base the best, but I would need an impact driver to get them in.
Hi Smiloid,

I'm in Australia so can't help you. Local machine shops and specialist welders would be able to do this for a price. Impact driver? Sometimes may be needed to get them out but don't put them in that way, you may damage them. Just use a big screwdriver and plenty of muscle…get them tight.

Michael
 

Smiloid

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Jan 14, 2018
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Something came to my mind, but I'd thought to ask you experts about it. Not entirely sure it can work. What about brazing a 0.25mm boss (4-5mm high) onto the screws, and drilling a 0.25mm hole 4-5mm into the center of the ends of the tapers? If tapped, it could result in the rods being forced onto the screws. Loctite could be then added to give extra support to the rod. Not certain it can work. Would stress result in the rod breaking again? I would think so, but I thought to ask. Not planning on having it done unless it might work. If there's any risk of damaging the rods further, then it is a no-go.

Edit: I'm not sure how well that will work. Drilling into the ends of the rods could destroy the tapers. Since they are antiques, I will not take a chance.

Edit #2: That gave me another idea. What if a 0.25mm hole or smaller was drilled into the screw as well, and a 0.25mm diameter or smaller beryllium copper shaft was inserted into the screw and then the rod was fitted onto the shaft? That would be stronger than the other idea as there'd be no break point possible at the screw's end. But it will only work if it is possible to do it without destroying the end of the necks. It would strengthen the rods after the Loctite is applied. But would the tone be affected? Both the rods and the screws would need to be held down in a vise so they stay still. What size should it not exceed if the smallest of the tapered ends of the rods is 1.4mm in width? I have no experience using drills, so I won't be doing this myself. Only somebody very experienced with such tools would be doing that. They'd have to drill straight down without any variance. I think this would only be accomplished with a drill press, and the rod would have to be affixed exactly in the center.

Final edit: I honestly think this won’t work. Even if the work was done successfully, wouldn’t the rod just break again during use? Also, I don’t know how a 0.25mm shaft could be made. A creative thought for sure, but not good enough.
 
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J. A. Olson

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Dec 21, 2006
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Ordinary brass brazing rods are soft metal, not highly tempered like chiming rods.
They will not give any satisfaction as chime rods, they will sound more like those tiny wind chimes you find in crafts stores.
 
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Smiloid

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Jan 14, 2018
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Ordinary brass brazing rods are soft metal, not highly tempered like chiming rods.
They will not give any satisfaction as chime rods, they will sound more like those tiny wind chimes you find in crafts stores.
Unless I were to get a single antique chime rod to sacrifice and get machined down to the right diameter and length, I don't think this will work. Would it be possible to drill a hole 0.25mm to 0.1mm in size in the tapered end of a chime rod where the break occurred? Or will that result in breakage of the tapered end? If a single thin shaft is used to put both the screw and rod on, will that enable the rod to work again? It would have to go into both the screw and the rod at once.

Also, would loctite affect the sound any if used to hold the tapered end of a rod in a similar sized hole drilled in the screw's threaded end? I saw this post:


I am currently trying to get the two missing screws remade. I can't go forwards with any attempt to get the rods fixed otherwise.
 
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