Can any one tell me who made this Granfather clock

swankyman

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I cant tell you much about it. The owner wasn't there so I wasn't allowed to take off the face.
It has a date calender under the hands.
The face looks bigger then the glass opening in the door and hides part of the outside pattern.
The weight is a tube and the pendulum is hand made looks like bottoms off of old tin cans filled with lead.
Its sitting in an antique store for sell, all I had was my phone to take the photos.
Here is more photos
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-7/1042582/2041468
 

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eskmill

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Your photos of the movement and face suggest the clock is a 30 hour running, chain pull-up "white dial" clock that probably was English or made of parts from England although the "Colonies" made lots of them using the English pattern.

The hands are wrong. The top of the case and the finish details suggest some handy work.

Lots more photos of the case construction, and fine details may give some idea of where and when it was made.
 

Mike Phelan

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It is a 30-hour from ca 1785-1810.

The case has been swapped as it's too small for the dial. It might be older. The hands are from an older clock and too small.

Nearly all of these have calendars but many of the Victorian bodgers cut the pin off as they were too lazy to repair them.

Is there a signature on the dial?

It could be English, but similar clocks were Wales, Scotland and Ireland. And USA.

The weight and pendulum bob are home made, but you knew that!

I've seen them at auctions for £300 - £500 depending on the state of the clock.

HTH
 

laprade

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swankyman,


It would appear that your clock is a casualty of the "mix and mismatch" brigade. However all is not lost. The repairs to the case could well have been done when the movement was swapped. The case is a very good one, despite its hardships. The medullary rays of the oak door panel are exquisite, and the mahogany crossbanding contrasts well with it. The photos don't give a good look at the mahogany colour down each side of the trunk, and I can't tell if the dark colour is rounded or square edged. The hood repairs look as if it had two gilt glazed panels either side of an oak strip. Not a difficult thing to fix.

Enough has been said about the face size, but the hour hand is correct and not too small. The minute hand is the right shape, but a tad too short. Either it has been broken or is a short replacement hand.

If you reflect light off the dial at an angle, you may see traces of the signature. The black enamel paint often looses its colour, but a "raised ghost" of the image will remain, which will show in reflected light.

You should advertize the dial size and see if you can get a swap, since the clock hasn't got its real movement, another swap wont make any difference.

The most important aspect of the clock is, in fact, the case. It most probably had a brass faced movement, which was swapped for a better case. Sorry to repeat myself: the case is a good one, and more pictures will help.

The case is more likely to be either, Welsh or English, as would be the face.
 

Jeremy Woodoff

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I would think this case originally had a painted dial. It surely is not older than ca. 1790 or so.
 

swankyman

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I'll have to get a better look next weekend and get some better photos. I must not be getting my emails on this post i didn't get them in my box.
Thanks for the information, they want $795. for it. Mark
 

Mike Phelan

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Not bad, Mark, if it's all complete and not too many bodges.
Easy to make a lead weight and not too much of a job to make the pendulum.
 

swankyman

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Well I went and bought it today. After a lot of dealing I got it for 500. I like it and always wanted a Grandfathers clock.
The top is missing something as I see it up close. Maybe someone can let me know what it need and looks like.
I do need one more weight and a chain as this only has the one.
The funny thing was he didn't under stand why it won't run. The chain is on the strike side but I didn't say anything I didn't want him to get mad.
-> posts merged by system <-
More photos, Has the name Wilson something on the calender back.
 

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Mike Phelan

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Well I went and bought it today. After a lot of dealing I got it for 500. I like it and always wanted a Grandfathers clock.
The top is missing something as I see it up close. Maybe someone can let me know what it need and looks like.
$500 is not bad at all. We can't see the top in your pictures, apart from the missing bit of veneer. Maybe the finials are missing?
I do need one more weight and a chain as this only has the one.
No you don't! There is only one weight and one endless chain on these! Is the lead ring still present? If not, easy to make or buy one. You will be making a weight, anyhow.
The funny thing was he didn't under stand why it won't run.
Not necessarily - dealers and auctioneers don't have to know anything about what they sell. It might just need a proper weight and pendulum, as the movement looks quite clean.
The chain is on the strike side but I didn't say anything I didn't want him to get mad.
If a seller "got mad" I would walk away - that's not the way to sell anything. :eek:
More photos, Has the name Wilson something on the calender back.
James Wilson were a well-known dial maker from Birmingham. Do a search on here for details - no point me repeating it.
 

laprade

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They say that the camera never lies!

Now that we have some good detailed pictures, I see that the dark side to the trunk in the original picture is not part of the clock.

The picture of the hood and dial, seemed to indicate that something was wrong with the frieze, but the close up of that shows a nice combination of crossbanding with some "string inlay" and two fielded panels in good oak.

If there are holes on the top corners of the hood, then it had finials (knobs).

The case is getting better all the time!
 

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laprade

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swankyman

Only one of the sprocket wheels actually moves and clicks when you pull the chain. The lead doughnut hangs in the loop between the two wheels. I don't have any 30hrs movets here, and can't remember which way it goes. I fixed one last month for a friend, but didn't have to play with the chain. I'm sure one of the others will fill you in.

While you are at it, check the sprocket pins and see if they are for a chain and not a rope. The pins will have sharp points if for a rope. Originally they were rope driven, but often they were converted. However, not always properly. Chain sprockets should have flat ended pins and indents between the pins to allow for the alternate links to be kept at the right angle.
 

swankyman

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Thank laprade, I do remember one did click. I'll have to take it down tonight and take a look. Starting to make since now. Still not sue what the ring looks like and what size it is. Mark
 

Mike Phelan

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Do I run the chain across the two chain sprockets? Where will the ring go when I get one? Thanks, Mark
Hi Mark
Only just got back - sorry for delay about replying.

Yes - two loops around the sprockets, and two hanging down. One with weight pulley, and one with the lead ring. The ring is about 2" outside diameter and 3/4" thickness - think small doughnuts (sorry, donuts!).
Easy to make one from scrap lead.

As laprade says:
If it had a chain originally, there are indentations between the pins on the sprockets; if ropes, sprockets were smooth.
Don't take too much notice of the pins being sharp - a century of winding with a chain would have made them so.
Many were converted to chain in the 19th C to avoid the fluff from the rope and the possibility of the rope breaking and the consequent hole in the floorboards!
 
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Mike Phelan

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It's coming along, Mark; are you OK with cleaning and lubricating it? It might not need much more.

The one thing that everyone forgets on these is that the pivot on the weight pulley requires oil. It can make a difference.

The clock also needs to be really solid on the floor, or screwed to the wall, or it can stop.

PS: Lead used for fishing weights has been banned here for a few years now.
 
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swankyman

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I'll have to tear it down and take a good look at the movement and the sprockets.

Football practice for the grandchild taking up my free time. Kids come first!

Did notice the teeth are gone that works the calender, any idea how to fix that?

Any idea who might have made the case? American, French English?

Any one have an idea what the top should have? It had a board running across the top that must have broken off at one time, not sure if it can be seen in the photos i have taken.

Thanks for all the help so far. Do want to get this up and running!!
 
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Mike Phelan

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Mark
What teeth do you mean (calendar)? The disc with the numbers should have 31 teeth on its periphery - it's moved by a pin on the hour wheel boss.

The case is probably English, but could be Welsh or Irish; less likely, Scottish. Some of these were made or assembled in USA, if that's where you are.

The top of the hood might have just been flat, with possibly three wood or brass finials on the front edge.
 

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