• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

bushings

clockman230@comcast.net

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Jan 30, 2005
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can anyone help me in acquiring bushings for a wooden geared clock with metal pivots. I have read that brass bushings are not the way to go so I would like similar bushings out of wood or another suitable material. thanks
 

R. Croswell

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can anyone help me in acquiring bushings for a wooden geared clock with metal pivots. I have read that brass bushings are not the way to go so I would like similar bushings out of wood or another suitable material. thanks

Brass bushings were used By a few makers, so if the clock was ORIGINALLY bushed with brass, and you want to keep it original, then brass would be appropriate. Brass bushings need oil - wood does not. Brass often corrodes in wood. We see wooden clocks with wood pivot holes (no bushings) that are still running after almost 200 years, perhaps longer.

I am not aware of a source of ready made bushings for wooden plates. I believe most people make their own. I prefer to make mine from Delrin-AF rod. The "purerist" usually use a plug cutter, available at better hardware stores, to cut a wood plug to make a wooden bushing. There have been a number of discussions here about bushing wooden movements if you use the search option.

RC
 
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Peter A. Nunes

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Mar 3, 2006
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I generally use wooden plugs, cut from scrap wooden movement clock plates, and stay away from plastic. Hardware store plug cutters are generally useless. I've spent a bit too much money on plug cutters from Fuller-

http://www.wlfuller.com/html/plug_cutters.html


Spend the money once, keep the cutters for years, never have a regret. The cutters are actually manufactured here in Rhode Island. Don't be impatient. I have cutters from 3/16" to 5/8", for those rare wooden movements whose holes have been bushed with generous quantities of brass or plastic.
 

clockman230@comcast.net

Registered User
Jan 30, 2005
205
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16
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I generally use wooden plugs, cut from scrap wooden movement clock plates, and stay away from plastic. Hardware store plug cutters are generally useless. I've spent a bit too much money on plug cutters from Fuller-

http://www.wlfuller.com/html/plug_cutters.html


Spend the money once, keep the cutters for years, never have a regret. The cutters are actually manufactured here in Rhode Island. Don't be impatient. I have cutters from 3/16" to 5/8", for those rare wooden movements whose holes have been bushed with generous quantities of brass or plastic.
can you send me 4 3/16 inch plugs ?

- - - Updated - - -

can you send me a few 3/16 inch plugs ?
 

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