• The online Bulletins and Mart and Highlights are currently unavailable due to a failure of a network piece of equipment. We are working to replace it and have the Online publications available as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience.

BUSHING WITH A SHERLINE MILL

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
So, the longer bits didn't give you enough room - even with the extender?
 

Bruce Alexander

Sponsor
NAWCC Brass Member
Feb 22, 2010
7,627
880
113
Hanover, PA
www.testoftimeclocks.com
Country
Region
Asking Bruce.
I'm using the standard 5410 with the 12" Column. The optional 15" Extended Column probably would have worked. I think the Extended Column is the setup that JohnP has and he says it has worked well for him with Hermle and Urgos Tall Case movements.

Bruce
 

Bruce Alexander

Sponsor
NAWCC Brass Member
Feb 22, 2010
7,627
880
113
Hanover, PA
www.testoftimeclocks.com
Country
Region
Last edited:

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
3,006
596
113
wisconsin
Country
Do you only Grind on One side :???::???:??
Teaclocks

You only grind one end and continue to use the other end as gage pins are designed to be used. After each use, they are returned to their designated position in the box for easy size reference next use.

A couple of notes.

(1) They are a reamer and not a drill, thus they only ream an existing hole to size and do not drill a hole

(2) As shown, they produce reamer results by producing a straight round non taper hole.

(3) The sharp edge cuts a hole to size leaving a smooth finish unlike a broach that scraps metal. Once the hole has been reamed, it is ready for use.

Jerry Kieffer
 
Last edited:

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
3,006
596
113
wisconsin
Country
Sorry
The point.
One side or three sides ?
Or two ?

Teaclocks
Just one side.

When grinding I grind free hand with the pin held in a pin vise on the side of a fine stone in a bench grinder. In addition, I dip the pin and head of the pin vise in Windex as well as spray the side of the stone often. This helps reduce over heating of the pin. I grind to about 12 degrees to produce a very sharp cutting edge and a fine finish.

Jerry Kieffer

DSCN3900.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Old Rivers

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
I am currently using a KWM bushing machine. I find the center with a center point, then lock the plate down, then insert the reamer, then nibble the unworn side and then ream out the hole.

When using a Sherline mill, is the run out so little that nibbling is not necessary? And, since the lowest speed is about 70 rpm, is this speed not too fast when using the KWM reamer? Is it best to use a collet to hold the KWM reamer for accuracy?

Thanks!
 

Bruce Alexander

Sponsor
NAWCC Brass Member
Feb 22, 2010
7,627
880
113
Hanover, PA
www.testoftimeclocks.com
Country
Region
Hello MM,

In my own experience:

nibbling is not necessary
Right. Nibbling is not necessary. The Mill setup doesn't flex. It drills, reams, mills on whatever center you set up. Certainly when working with Brass Plates that are just a few millimeters thick.

is this speed not too fast when using the KWM reamer?
Not sure what the lowest RPM setting is but to answer your question, No. The Mill can be run a lot slower than most Drill Presses. You can dial in very low speeds but you lose torque so there's a practical limit. I just go as slow as I can while still having enough torque to cut through the plate. The lower the speed, the lower the impact of any run out in your set up.

Is it best to use a collet to hold the KWM reamer for accuracy?
I use both a 3/8" drill chuck as well as collets. Just depends on the situation and how small the pivots are. If the pivots are less than about 1mm, I'll bush with collets. In all cases I prefer to use pin gauges to locate center.

Regards,

Bruce
 
Last edited:

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
If using the pin method to find center, it seems a 3-jaw self-centering chuck would be the best as it can hold both the pin and then the reamer. Is the accuracy often in jeopardy using the 3-jaw? If using collets, I imagine you would need one to hold the pin, then switch it out for the one to hold the reamer. It this more accurate and just as easy? At least one collet size would be dedicated for the KWM reamer that I would use, would one collet size cover a range of pins? If so, what is the typical number of collets needed for clock movements and range of sizes?

Since I am asking a lot of questions, here is another. Is the procedure to go from pin to reamer (the size of the bushing) or is there an in-between such as a reamer of a smaller size? Thanks!
 

Vernon

NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Dec 9, 2006
1,118
157
63
Country
Region
I think that you getting the three jaw and Jacobs Chuck confused. You won't notice a difference between the Jacobs chuck and the collets for most bushing work.
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
Ah, Jacobs chuck is more accurate than a 3 jaw? Or, sounds like a 3-jaw is not the way to go. Thus, Jacobs would be close in accuracy to the collets - yes?
 

Vernon

NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Dec 9, 2006
1,118
157
63
Country
Region
I've never used a 3 jaw for this type of work. Not even sure that it's possible. You might consider buying Jerry's video on Bushing and Depthing on the Sherline Mill available from this sight. It could answer a lot of questions
 
Last edited:

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
I have been looking at both lathe and mill recently - and I was thinking the mill uses 3 and 4 jaw chucks. Anyway, Jacobs is on my brain now. The video sounds like a must!
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
The Sherline 5400 comes with a 1/4" drill chuck. I am switching to the mill from my bushing machine for doing bushing work. I like the idea of using a drill chuck as I can put my pins in there and the tools to bush without changing collets. My impression from comments on the board is that the drill chuck is adequate for bushing accuracy, with perhaps exceptions for very small pins. If true, great! Would one gain a noticeable precision using a precision drill chuck such as ones made by Albrecht?
 

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
3,006
596
113
wisconsin
Country
The Sherline 5400 comes with a 1/4" drill chuck. I am switching to the mill from my bushing machine for doing bushing work. I like the idea of using a drill chuck as I can put my pins in there and the tools to bush without changing collets. My impression from comments on the board is that the drill chuck is adequate for bushing accuracy, with perhaps exceptions for very small pins. If true, great! Would one gain a noticeable precision using a precision drill chuck such as ones made by Albrecht?
Greater than you could imagine including the price.

Jerry Kieffer
 
Last edited:

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
Thanks Jerry! The mill comes with [ ¼” Drill Chuck w/ key, #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt], if I am looking for an upgrade, such as one made by Albrecht, should I search for one that has a #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt? I saw a listing of many type and arrangements, I just want to make sure I get one compatible with the 5400 mill. (I am machinist illiterate)
 

Bruce Alexander

Sponsor
NAWCC Brass Member
Feb 22, 2010
7,627
880
113
Hanover, PA
www.testoftimeclocks.com
Country
Region
I would be reluctant to seat a bushing using the closed jaws of such an accurate (expensive) drill chuck. As it is, I place a KWM Plugging Tool in my Sherline Drill Chuck to seat my bushings. Perhaps I shouldn't worry about it. The forces aren't that great. If/when I think that I need maximum precision with small pivots, I simply go to my Collet set up. When I'm ready to seat, out comes the collet and in goes the steel rod through the collet adapter.
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
Yes, I would be reluctant to use the closed jams (especially an expensive one and one bought for precision) to seat a bushing. I would use other method. Hopefully someone has info on what to look for that will fit Sherline mill.
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
The 5400 mill comes with [ ¼” Drill Chuck w/ key, #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt], if I am looking for an upgrade, such as to one made by Albrecht, would I search for one that has a #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt? I saw a listing of many types and arrangements, for Albrecht chucks, and I just want to make sure I get one compatible with the 5400 mill. Disclaimer: I am machinist illiterate and any help I get is much appreciated! Thanks!
 

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
3,006
596
113
wisconsin
Country
The 5400 mill comes with [ ¼” Drill Chuck w/ key, #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt], if I am looking for an upgrade, such as to one made by Albrecht, would I search for one that has a #1 Morse arbor with draw bolt? I saw a listing of many types and arrangements, for Albrecht chucks, and I just want to make sure I get one compatible with the 5400 mill. Disclaimer: I am machinist illiterate and any help I get is much appreciated! Thanks!
I would suggest when purchasing a 1/4" and larger Albrecht chuck, that you purchase the chuck with 3/8 x 24 threaded mounting and use Sherlines MT-1 threaded mounting arbor that incorporates the draw bar.

Jerry Kieffer
 

MuensterMann

Registered User
Mar 23, 2008
1,565
22
38
Thank you Jerry for the suggestion! I did a quick look and found that not many Albrecht chucks come with that threaded mounting. Others did such as Rohm and Jacobs.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
168,853
Messages
1,473,376
Members
48,613
Latest member
johndavidcham
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,955
Last update
-