BUSHING WITH A SHERLINE MILL

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by John P, Mar 26, 2020 at 6:22 AM.

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  1. John P

    John P Registered User
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    Has anyone here worked out the details for bushing clock plates with a mill?
    What kind of plate holding fixture is needed? Can one be purchased?

    johnp
     
  2. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    There's a wealth of information on this MB, in particular, just look for posts by Jerry Kieffer.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  3. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Some folks make their own posts, but a setup can be ordered from Sherline:

    https://www.sherline.com/product/2118-horological-milling-machine-bushing-and-depthing-accessory/

    I use it and it works well. The only case in which I wasn't able to use it was when I wanted to use the set up as a Depthing Tool on a Herschede 9-tube movement. It wasn't "high" enough.

    Here are a couple of links:

    bushing with a mill

    Bushing with a milling machine setup


    Here is some information on Jerry's online course: Products by Category

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
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  4. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    For those who are using a Sherline Mill for bushing, the attached photo shows My first movement holder and the Sherline holder. My holder on the left is larger and very rigid but is sometimes limited when holding plates where one would like to hold in a tight area. The Sherline holders are a little smaller and more versatile, but the half moon protective clamping block shown in the middle factory stock holder, can be time consuming in use at times. I modified mine by installing a spring loaded middle screw at the arrow shown in the holder on the right. This saves considerable time in use.

    Jerry Kieffer

    View attachment 578545

    fullsizeoutput_544.jpeg
     
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  5. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I assume that the spring loaded screw is screwed into the half moon to pull it up. Correct? Seems like a good idea!

    Uhralt
     
  6. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Uhralt
    That would be correct and should have been included as part of the description.

    Thanks for the clarification

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  7. John P

    John P Registered User
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    Here is my set up so far. Im using the WW collet holder and trying to figure out a good way to center up on a bushing hole using a .31 gauge pin, a tapered pin, just anything to get some accuracy into the mix.
    Could someone tell me what they use for centering up the plate before cutting the bushing?
    P3280132.JPG P3270130.JPG
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    If you can get your gauge pin sitting in the original hole, it should be right. They make pointed center finders that you could use too, but the gauge pin idea is a good one. Just match the size to the original hole.
     
  9. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    As SB mentions, I acquired a set of pin gauges and chuck up one that closely matches the diameter of the pivot.
    I then set up center by carefully aligning with the unworn side of the pivot hole.
     
  10. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    If you choose a diameter very slightly larger than the original pivot, the gauge pin will only fit into the original center. I use a stereo microscope to watch closely how it enters the hole. If you see any deflection of the pin, you are not quite on center. I use this method only for small pivot holes of less than 1 mm. For the larger ones I use a tapered center finder. I still use the microscope to ensure that the center finder has found the largest diameter of the hole.

    Uhralt
     
  11. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    To each his own. I use magnification and plenty of light but I don't have a microscope on hand. I do look closely for deflection. It's not hard to see.
     
  12. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I guess your eyesight is better than mine. For me, the microscope is very helpful.

    Uhralt
     
  13. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #13 Bruce Alexander, Mar 29, 2020 at 3:32 PM
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2020 at 3:39 PM
    Perhaps.

    I usually have an "Optivisor" type headband on, and various hand held magnifiers nearby as well.
    I wear glasses and have difficulty reading without them but my vision is adequate for now.

    Bruce
     
  14. John P

    John P Registered User
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    I have tried the pin gauges in my collet but when I rotate the spindle, there is wobble in the pin. How much pin should be sticking out of the collet.
    Also I have tried pointed center finders and they all wobble when rotated by hand. All my equipment is new.
    Here is what I am working with.
    P3290140.JPG
    The short one has no wobble at all but you have to run the spindle down so far you cant see to align the plate to the good side of the worn bushing.
    P3280132.JPG

    I have everything worked out but the issue of lining up the d shaped cutter to the bushing hole.

    johnp
     
  15. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    There should not be any wobble if everything is inserted correctly and tight. Where do you see the wobble - just at the end or all along the shaft? Does the collet look bent at all?
     
  16. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #16 Bruce Alexander, Mar 30, 2020 at 7:57 AM
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2020 at 8:06 AM
    I always check for run out under power before I try to line up on center. Keep your pin as short as possible while still being able to view the pivot hole. You can try to true it up with gentle finger pressure. You might try flipping the Pin Gauge to see if it runs truer on the other end. No doubt you've checked carefully for swarf, etc.

    Actually, I have had pretty good results working with my 3-Jaw Chuck and Pin Gauges. They seem to run pretty true without making them too short to be useful. If you have one, try it. As an added bonus, it's a little faster for setup and tooling.

    If I need to work with pivot holes 1mm or less, I'll work with my Collets but, again, for some reason I tend to observe more run out with them vs. the 3-Jaw Chuck in my Mill so that's my go-to. Some folks will close the jaws completely to use them as a press. I like to chuck up a plugging tool. Just my personal preference. I use the KWM System.

    Pretty neat setup by the way.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  17. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    John
    On my initial setup for the use of gage pins for this application, the setup and my experience was/is as follows.

    (1) I first made sure that no-one had placed a heavy load on a tommy bar inserted in only one hole of a empty spindle. Sherline cautions that the tommy bar be placed in both holes. If not a slight bur can be placed on the inside of the taper causing accuracy issues with the collet adaptor and other accessories. From this point the collet adaptor was setup per Sherlines instructions.

    (2) My everyday beater collet set is a mix of known brand collets with the bad ones removed and replaced. Non of the collets are made in China nor would I suggest such collets from past and current experience.

    (3) The range of Gage pins used for this purpose were rolled on a known flat surface such as a surface plate and checked for warpage since they are a import set.

    (4) In use the gage pins are inserted in the proper size collet with about .375" to .500" extended from the front of the collet. Under the conditions above, no runout issues have been experienced using gage pins at about .020" diameter and above.

    (5) When using gage pins about .020" and below, they can become quite unstable when providing the working clearance required. Under these conditions, I cut off a short piece of the pin and insert it in the nose of a watchmakers staking set stake per attached photo. Again, under this condition runout has not been an issue providing the pin was not warped and the stake is not defective.

    Jerry Kieffer

    fullsizeoutput_548.jpeg
     

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