• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Bushing Question

Dietofnothing

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Nov 7, 2020
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Correct me if I’m wrong please. When replacing bushings , you ream through the inside of the plate & push the bushing through the plate from inside to outside. If the new bushing has an oil sink, it goes on outside.

Correct?

Thanks.
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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Sometimes it is impossible to ream and push from the back side due to a lever mount or some object in the way of the bushing machine. In that case, I ream and push in the bushing from the front making sure the rear side of the bushing is flush with the plate. If you are bushing by hand, this does not apply. Since reamers cut a straight hole rather than tapered, it really doesn’t matter as long as the rear of the bushing is flush with the plate. If you use a file or broach that is tapered, however, it probably would be better to broach/file and push from the rear side so the bushing won’t pop out. And, yes, the oil sink always goes on the outside.
Will
 

Dietofnothing

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Nov 7, 2020
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Thank you - so you pretty much do everything from “inside” of plates (side gears are on) generally. Also, I’m wondering if on “outside” of plates, if new bushing stands proud of the plate (bushing is thicker than plate) if you need to file it flush?

It seems to preserve the end shake, you want the bushing flush with the plate on the inside. I’ve seen pics of various movements where it looks like someone filed the bushing flat on the outside (I’m assuming because it was too tall) and it makes the movement look horrible because there were scratches all over the plate. Not sure if it’s their technique or just the cost of filing the bushing. Is there any reason the bushing needs to be flush on outside of plate? Or, if it’s a little tall can you just leave it? Trying to learn the right way, thanks in advance.
 

wow

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A bulls foot file is great for grinding proud bushings without scratching the plate. Once ground down, an oil sink can be formed on the outside of the plate using a chamfering tool, dental burr, or other tools. Do a search on bulls foot file and there are threads concerning oil sinks on this message board.
 

shutterbug

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What you want to prevent is tunneling. That happens when the bushing extends beyond the pivot. Otherwise it's just cosmetic. I've seen many proud bushings that caused no issues.
 

bikerclockguy

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What you want to prevent is tunneling. That happens when the bushing extends beyond the pivot. Otherwise it's just cosmetic. I've seen many proud bushings that caused no issues.
I’ve never ground/filed a bushing completely flush with the outside of the plate, for the reasons mentioned in the original post; didn’t want to scratch the plate and also couldn’t see how a bushing that was just slightly proud could cause any problems. Your reply piqued my curiosity though, Shut. What are the issues with “tunneling”?
 

shutterbug

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The wearing eats away under the surface of the bushing, and puts pressure on it from the top and sides. It can go unnoticed, since it looks fine from the surface.
 
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Dietofnothing

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Nov 7, 2020
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So, I think I get it. If the pivot exceeds the bushing (pomes out) - you’re good. If not - shorten the bushing.
 
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