Bushing Blanks

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Harry Hopkins, Aug 1, 2019.

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  1. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    I recently reordered some KWM sized 'The System' bushing blanks. These came with a cupped out divot on one end (see picture). I would prefer the blanks to be flat on both sides. I cannot think of any advantage a blank with a the divot has. Does anyone know if this is the way these blanks are made now?
    blank.jpg
     
  2. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Maybe an oil cup?
     
  3. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I think so too.
    However, it makes little sense to me to provide pre-made oil cups in blanks. Usually a blank is used to plug an out-of- center hole. When the hole for the pivot is drilled where the true center is, it will not be in the middle of the bush and the oil sink. It will look odd. It would look better when the oil sink is made after the hole has been drilled.

    Uhralt
     
  4. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Yup, so called oil sink. Use those if the original has an oil sink and if they don't use a longer one and cut off the sink.

    David
     
  5. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    I completely agree. I use blanks most often to fill a hole in a barrel where a hook has become loose and I need to move it and fill the old hole and in that case I suppose the cup on the inside of the barrel will make little difference... but.. when using a blank in a clock plate it is almost always because you are moving a misplaced pivot hole so the new hole will most probably not be in the center of the blank. Trying to drill a pivot hole on the curved surface of the preformed oil sink would be difficult at best.

    I seldom have the need to use blanks for any reason and I will just use longer ones and shorten to remove the oil sink when necessary but was surprised when I received these.
     
  6. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    I have some KWM #3 (or III) blanks I bought years ago out of caution, but I really don't know how to use them.

    I thought that if I remove a mislocated bushing I could just press one of these blanks into the plate in its place and all is forgiven. But it's not, because the correct location for that bushing is likely to be a millimeter or two away from the first, and when I drill for the new bushing everything will pretty much fall apart.

    It might work if, instead of drilling a hole for a bushing right there I was to just drill a new pivot hole with the proper size drill. Is that the idea behind these?

    Mark Kinsler
     
  7. TooManyClocks

    TooManyClocks Registered User
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    #7 TooManyClocks, Aug 2, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 2, 2019


    I guess i can answer that question because i’ve used them. Before i ever bushed anything, i soaked up all i could on this message board about what to do. Somewhere there is an old thread about what to do when you get a pivot hole off center. The advice given, which i ended up following as i was learning the bushing process—and screwed up a few times— is to use the opposite plate (usually the back plate) as a reference point, and use a compass to triangulate off three pivot holes.

    Have the blank bushing already installed filling in the misaligned hole, and use the compass on the opposite plate. Place the compass between the where the misaligned pivot hole and another pivot point would be on the opposite plate and carefully, without bumping the compass out of adjustment, place the compass on the same two holes on the plate with the misaligned holes, and draw a small arc where the pivot hole needs to be. Go back to the opposite plate and where the arbor for the misaligned pivot hole would be, locate the compass there, and find another pivot hole nearby, and get that distance set on your compass between those points, and go back to the problem area on the first plate, find the corresponding holes and draw another small arc bisecting the first one. Do that a total of three times. Wherever the three arcs meet is where to drill a new hole. I just drilled a small undersize hole and broached it out to fit the pivot properly.

    Done this way three times helps in case you accidentally bump your compass out of adjustment, and is a good check for possible measurement errors. It is a rather inelegant, but functional way of fixing learning mistakes, and it did get me out of a jam at the time.

    I used this method on a nice Ansonia kitchen clock that my brother now has that is in constant use in his home. It runs well, and seems to be totally unbothered by the experience.

    Newbie mistakes, but i had to give myself permission to learn...;)

    I figured i’d need to get a good compass for this, but surprisingly, the cheap $4 compass i had around did just fine. Having a sharp point on the pencil, and taking my time, i got my pivot hole where it needed to be. I took measurements afterward, and found out i was spot on. Photo of my cheap compass attached...

    I don’t necessarily advocate this approach to fixing misaligned pivot holes, but it’s what i did at the time, and it worked. When the clock needs repair and this pivot hole is worn some years in the future, another blank bushing could be installed, and the process repeated, or some better repair applied.

    This may be more answer to your question than you wanted! Hope I wasn’t too long winded:)

    John

    74C49E02-68BA-4A45-A949-760C364AF4EF.jpeg

    I've put a link to this post in Hints & How-Tos
    bangster, Moderator
     
  8. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Thank you. And an excellent cheap compass it is. I've done that sort of thing with a pair of Hecho en Pakistan dividers, which are cheap, easy to adjust, and retain their setting without difficulty. I use these to help lay out dials, to determine distances between holes, and to give my hand a good stab when I go rummaging carelessly through the tool drawer.

    I'm currently transferring most of my tools to magnetic tool-holder strips, which are on sale at Harbor Freight Tools. It's been working great, and my tools always picked up magnetism before I used them.
     
  9. TooManyClocks

    TooManyClocks Registered User
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    Ah yes, tools...

    There are days when it seems their primary purpose is to inflict scars on me, and quite secondarily to actually produce work. For example, there has been for several decades a near perfect scar in the shape of a phillips head screwdriver point in the palm of my hand. It’s been long enough now i don’t even really remember quite how i managed it in the first pace. This just one of many examples of my prowess with tools...

    If only magnetic tool holder strips would solve my problems...:D
    My wife is convinced there is no cure

    John
     
  10. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    My uncle worked for several years as a draftsman and one day managed to give himself a vicious poke in the palm of his hand with the point of a pencil. It produced a nicely-formed black tattoo dot.

    The trick with magnetic tool strips seems to be to buy a lot of them, because they don't work well when they're overcrowded. They'll hold lots of tools, but you're liable to knock off neighboring tools when reaching for something.

    M Kinsler

    that can of WD-40 is always ready.
     
  11. TooManyClocks

    TooManyClocks Registered User
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    I’ve had to resort to less damaging to the walls means of tool storage than magnetic tool strips in my clock repair area...mounting them on the spare bedroom wall would get frowned upon around here!

    My WD-40 is at the ready as well...

    (Ok its outside, and the only clock related thing WD-40 gets used for is to clean gunk off mainsprings)

    By the way, what is thread drift, and does it have anything to do with the direction this discussion is going?:whistle:

    John
     
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  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Perhaps if the bushing in question were drilled and mounted from the opposite side it could be used to move a wheel. Drilling from the oil sink side would surely be an exercise in futility. And mounting with the oil sink out wouldn't be an issue but would look odd. ;)
     
  13. TooManyClocks

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    #13 TooManyClocks, Aug 2, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2019
    The oil sink side on mine have quite a drop in the middle ending in a pronounced divot in the middle. That became useful in one case where I encountered a homemade bushing that was worn. The OD was in between my KWM sizes, which is all I have, and slightly smaller than the blank bushings I have. I reamed it out for a blank bushing, and drilled right down the center of that divot which was centered where I needed it. Broached it to fit the pivot. That one was an easy use of the oil sink side.

    Otherwise, drilling from the oil sink side anywhere off center just creates headaches. Any drilling I did was from the opposite (flat) side.

    And yes, having the oil sink on the outside when fixing a misaligned bushing does look odd.
    I speak from experience on that one. Actually, a blank bushing with an off center pivot hole looks odd from either side!:)

    John
     
  14. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Right, but if you need an oil sink because all the other pivots have them, it looks better when the oil sink is centered around the pivot hole.

    Uhralt
     
  15. TooManyClocks

    TooManyClocks Registered User
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    Very true. If I hadn’t screwed up and reamed out the pivot hole off center while I was learning how to install bushings by hand, I wouldn’t have had to drill the pivot hole off center in the blank bushing to get the pivot hole back where it belonged.

    It isn’t elegant, and I don’t necessarily recommend doing it that way, it’s just what I did back then. It does work, however...

    Hopefully never again!
    If nothing else the weird look of it is an incentive to not ever screw up like that again...I’m probably the only one who will ever know in my lifetime, but it does bug me.

    John
     
  16. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I think most of us have some skeletons like this in the closet from experiences in the past.... I certainly do.

    Uhralt
     
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  17. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

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    I once cleaned a cuckoo clock with WD-40.

    :eek:
     
  18. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Wd-40 isn't a bad cleaner. Just be sure it's all cleaned off afterward.
     
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