Bulletin back issues

Discussion in 'Horological Books' started by waricks, Dec 23, 2008.

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  1. waricks

    waricks Registered User

    Jun 2, 2008
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    Hi there,

    I am still a new member as I joined earlier this year. I missed the first two issues of the bulletin and I was wondering how to obtain them so I have a compete set.

    Thanks for any info, I searched the homepage but I was not able to find anything that would help me.

    Bill
     
  2. RON in PA

    RON in PA Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    May 18, 2005
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    Contact the NAWCC book store, they will have what you need.
     
  3. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
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    Horological Bibliographer -
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    The NAWCC is quite helpfull in obtaining past Bulletins at reasonable rates. The Museum store will point you in the right direction. It may be that the sale of back Bulletins has been recently shiftesd to the Library.

    They usually have most recent issues, and many very early ones (I personally am lucky to have assembled years a go a complete set which I have bound into hardcover volume).


    Old Bulletins are a wondefull spource especially because there is a powerfull - though somewhat quirky- searchable online index by issue, author, title and keywords.

    Happy hunting for horological information


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  4. waricks

    waricks Registered User

    Jun 2, 2008
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    Thanks for the information - I have contacted the book store and I will be ordering the two that I am missing for this year. I would love to have a complete set of all of the volumes but I am sure my wife would have something to say about where I would need to put them. She already groans over wall space for clocks. I do think I will be ordering the hardbound sets that are available through the book store though.

    Does anybody have a favorite magazine binder system? I have seen many that you can place magazines in and I think I would like to have them put away nicely in a binder or something similar.

    Thanks again!

    Bill
     
  5. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
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    Horological Bibliographer -
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    Those are a steal. They printed to many when they were created, and most members who want them have bought sets (at much higer prices than charged now) So you can get the reprints of the early issues for nearly nothing.


    Tons of goods information in there.



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  6. BILL KAPP

    BILL KAPP Registered User

    Feb 19, 2002
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    Arroyo Grande, Ca
    Hi there,

    Great idea to get the hardbound copies, they are cheap!

    Best source for missing issues at the cheapest cost is marts/regionals or land based chapter meetings.

    I maintain the library for chapter 52 and am always giving away old issues to new members.

    Savings on the postage is also an advantage in picking these up at marts and meetings.

    I just use three adjustable shelves in my 6 foot by 3 foot bookshelve and that holds all the issues nicely. The other three shelves are full of watch and clock books.

    happy hunting,
     
  7. ggordon

    ggordon Registered User

    Dec 23, 2001
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  8. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
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    Horological Bibliographer -
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    Yes they are.

    I personally believe that NAWCc is selling them off way to cheaply. They were produced about 15 years ago and somebody way overestimated the demand (there was no print on demand industry then), so for the last 5 years the museum giftstore has been trying to make at least some money of a supply sitting in their basement.


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  9. Jon Hanson

    Jon Hanson Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    $5. a volume is insane and a great bargain--practically a giveaway; but it is not unexpected--they did the same to the Marion book and destroyed its value!
     
  10. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 8, 2003
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    Ikea sells two types of upright magazine boxes. One is made of very thin unfinished, but finely sanded, hardwood plywood with box joints. These can be stained (non-grainraising stain is best) and finished to match your bookshelves. They look great.
    The second type is made of hardboard (strawboard to bookbinders) covered with a paper faux leather, available in several colors. The red isn't too garish, but the yellow is bilious. They have brass mounts and a slot for holding a contents card.
    Both are inexpensive, but might be gotten cheaper at a sale price. I bought a large number of the first type a few years ago for $2.99 each.
     
  11. Fortunat Mueller-Maerki

    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki National Library Chair
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Life Member

    Aug 25, 2000
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    Horological Bibliographer -
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    Magazine Boxes, as suggested by Bill Ward, are the most economical way to store and organize sets of historic magazines.

    Various materials are available at stationary stores like Staples or Office Depot (or more specialized library/Archive supply stores like Gaylord.com). The sturdiest ones (usually found only at Libraries) were (and still are ) made from steel, but even Libraries today use mainly hard plastic ones. Many types are available. Open back ones have the advantage that one can read the spines, but the drawback that magazines can slip out easily when the box is handled. They are available in many colors, some are translucent as well. Cheaper ones are made of cardboard and shipped flat (some assembly required). If you get cardboard make sure the material is acid free if long term conservation (more than 10 years) is a concern.

    For high usage (where ther is a real danger of individual issues getting seperated or lost) or high quality magazine - where you have reason to believe that they may be of interest to future generations - storage boxes are unsatisfactory. The only way to go is to bund the issues into volumes by a bookbinder. The cost is much higher, probably starting at 25$ plus a volume, with no upper limit if you want fancy material like real leather bindings.

    For my own personal library there are about 20 horological periodicals that I have bound into hardcovers, and another 15 that I collect in magazine boxes.

    If you are willing to do something to help the long term preservation of horological knowledge in the world you should invest in hardcover bindings. Experience shows that most heirs just junk loose or boxed magazines upon the death of the collector, but usually go out of their way to to find a buyer (or a donation to a library) for sets of hardbound magazines.

    By the way: The more obscure (and the smaller the edition) of a magazine the more important it is to hardbind them. The glossy - high print run magazines of the past are easy to find, the cheaply produced, mimeographed newsletters are extremly rare.

    Fortunat.



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  12. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
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    Jan 8, 2003
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    Sadly, Fortunat is right in that periodicals get no respect. This is especially unfortunate in that periodicals are usually the repositories of the most in-depth knowledge at any time, and thus give an idea, to the historian, of what was known when. They also are the primary sources which reflect most accurately the general consensus at the time they were published, which is often not the case with books.
    But it's not just heirs who destroy periodicals. I've seen literally truckloads of old magazines and newspapers sold for a pittance to print dealers who freely admit that they intend to cut them up for the illustrations, which they color and frame. And I've seen libraries, in the grip of a techno-frenzy, destroy dumpsterloads of their periodicals, exchanged for poor microfilm copies, or just to make space for computers, or even a coffee shop.
     
  13. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
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    Bill,

    I am sure you will be thrilled by the quality of the scans of the Bulletin when the new web site goes live. :)

    It is tragic that so many of the old periodicals get lost. Newsprint is of course the worst treated of all the ephemera. I have some old engineering newspapers that I bought out of curiosity. Their condition is so bad that I cannot look at them when my wife is in the house without making her ill from all the mold spores released.:eek:
     
  14. waricks

    waricks Registered User

    Jun 2, 2008
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    Thanks everybody for the added info. I think I will go for the magazine boxes. I know what you mean about magizines get no respect. I was fortunate enough to get a large portion of my uncles Bulletin collection when he passed away. I have 1963-78, 1983-88 and 1991-2003. Cost me more than my wife wanted me to pay to have them shipped from PA to Washington state. But I love to grab one of those on a quiet saturday and just read from front to back or sometimes back to front. :)

    So if anybody has some clock mags that they want to get rid of just let me know - I will take them!

    Bill
     
  15. bchaps

    bchaps Registered User

    Dec 16, 2001
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    I have occasionally seen an old hard bound edition of the Bulletin at a Chapter Mart or Regional, but I really didn't pay any attention. But WOW, thanks to this thread, I have just purchased every hardbound edition the Bookstore had available and at $5.00 each. I have used the online index and frequently found much information was available on the desired subject prior to my first issue date of 1988. Well, I've just filled in most years from 1944 thru 1967 for only $35.00. Imagine 11 to 30 Bulletins, hardbound for $5.00...you can't buy a new text book for twice that money!

    I'm going to suggest, these hard bound back issues are one of the well kept secrets at NAWCC. At five bucks each, bound Bulletin volumes should not be stored in a basement, but in the hands of interested users. What about a promotional sidebar or pop up on the MB?
     

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