build a pendulum clock

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by teslak, Dec 30, 2012.

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  1. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    #1 teslak, Dec 30, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2018
    Hi all,

    my name is Dieter I am 50 years old and I live in Middle Franconia in Germany. I am passionate about second clocks. Since I am still learning English, are still a lot of mistakes in my text.
    When building my clock, I am guided by the Hermann Goertz watches from Glashütte in Saxony. Feature of his watches was that all wheels and pinions were arranged in a line with each other, which I particularly like.
    Aufriss_Räder_Version47.pdf Aufriss_Räder_Version41.pdf


    Best regards,
    Dieter
     

    Attached Files:

  2. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
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    That clock has ball bearings on all its arbors. Is that your design or did Goertz use ball bearings back in the 1860s? Very handsome clock; I look forward to your progress reports. I notice the two C springs for the maintain power so the force is balanced - a nice detail.
     
  3. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello tok tokkie,
    No, the ball bearing, I have integrated, because I want do without lubrication. That's why I put a ball bearing ceramic on all axes. The wheels and pinions get a DLC coating so omitted here the lubricating film can.
    here are some pictures of the already-built parts watches

    We begin with the center wheel
    3518.jpg

    3519.jpg

    35181.jpg

    All parts are manufactured with me on my machine

    Here is the making of the gear shaft
    3842.jpg

    align in some apparatus
    3854.jpg

    Einrichtblatt zum Fräsen.jpg
    Milling cutters with Thornton
    3857.jpg

    The finished blanks here
    3862.jpg
    3863.jpg

    best regards
    Dieter
     
  4. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Nice crisp work Dieter!
     
  5. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
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    I am interested in the coating you have done to those gears. I too am making a clock and wanted to cut the gears from gauge plate (AISI 01 ; WN1.2510 ) but was told the TiNi coating process is done at 470°C and that gauge plate is tempered at 150 - 200°C so coating it will anneal it completely. Because of that I did not follow that path. Your gears appear to be brass. The DLC coating will make them last forever and reduce the friction dramatically. I had not realised that DLC coating could be gold coloured - I thought it was grey with a violet tinge to it. Lovely gear cutting. My gears are plain brass with silver steel (drill steel) pinions hardened and tempered.

    I like the 7 spoke design. All of my gears are 5 spoke - the thing to avoid is an even number of spokes for it makes the gear look stodgy and hefty like a cart wheel with the spokes opposite each other.

    My clock too has all ball bearings but I have used stainless steel bearings though I would like to replace the escape wheel bearing with ceramic. Expensive bearings but your clock is going to be an heirloom in your family. Sattler use stainless steel bearings (except the pallet shaft which is jewelled - I don't understand why - oscillation not good with ball bearings? I refer to their M1 kit clock; don't know about the others.)

    I like the double clicks on the maintain power ratchets so that you get a click each 1/2 tooth advance. Nice details and the simple straight geartrain is very elegant. I will watch this thread with great interest.
     
  6. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello Tok Tokkie,
    I want to use the DLC coating because the process temperatures are relatively low, only 200 ° C. The layer thickness 2-3/1000mm.
    The material I use on all wheels MS58 hard (CuZn39Pb2) and one for the shoots treated steel ETG100.
    Teeth as I use 220Z, 128Z and 120Z, all gear 16T.
    The anchor escapement is to be built with ceramic ball bearings. But if it does not work, I can still go on ruby bearings.
    I am glad that you like my design of the clock.
    Most parts of the clock are made for me with the engraving machine. Here, an example for the production of the locking cone.
    IMG_4159.jpg
    the Gravierschablone was made on a cnc milling machine, but it also without
    IMG_4160.jpg
    Blank prepared and clamped in a three-jaw chuck
    IMG_4161.jpg
    zero point set in Z
    IMG_4166.jpg
    Plunging only 0.2 mm
    IMG_4168.jpg
    Geometry to full depth finish
    IMG_4170.jpg
    Cutter diameter 1.5 mm, speed 8000 r / min

    The parts are separated with a saw blade on the milling machine from the base.



    you have also pictures of your clock, which I would find very interesting and can guaranteed to learn something.

    best regards
    Dieter
     
  7. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    In many years past ball bearings in the verge was said not to work well as the very limited range of motion of the verge back and forth would wear a minute depression in both the race and the balls themselves over a few years of use and ultimately stop the clock. I have not seen any testing done with today's steel or ceramic technology(s) and I have never personally verified the stated hypothsis to be valid. I have had 2 or 3 clocks with ball bearings in the verge (tower clocks or post clocks) that had apparently run well for a long time.
     
  8. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello Jim Du Bois,

    I've also had no experience with the ball bearings. But few people know that they have installed with success in their watches.

    Stephan Gagneux has take measurements in seconds clocks proved the opposite. All his watches are equipped with ball bearings, the force required for the movement is less measurable.

    best regards,
    Dieter
     
  9. ccwk

    ccwk Registered User
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    Jan 27, 2011
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    Hello Dieter, congratulations on an excellent start on your clock, I too will be looking forward to updates as the quality of workmanship from what I’ve seen to date is impressive. I assume you have a background in machining, this cant’ be your first clock? Once again well done.
     
  10. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Hello Dieter,

    I also will be following your most impressive workmanship. Thank you for sharing it!

    Do you know if Stephan Gagneux specifically tested to compare the breakaway friction of ruby vs. ball bearings? It is my understanding that this is where the ruby jeweling has an advantage.

    I like your use of bearing mounts retained w/screws. I am doing something similar and it is much easier to test differences in bearing styles and materials.
     
  11. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hallo
    Yes right, i learned at many years ago the job of a mechanic. For a long time, I work in a different job.

    This clock is my first clock that I design and build. I work since two years to the clock and have many parts two or three times produced because they are not managed well.
    It is not bad if it takes longer until the clock is ready. I want to learn as much as until then about clockmakers.

    Yes, that is what he has measured and compared, also proved that for clocks the ball bearings last longer run than those with the same input ruby bearing.

    that is the reason why come in the clock anywhere chatons to use, you can always change the types of bearing.
     
  12. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello
    here are some pictures of my workshop at home
    Bild23.jpg
    The milling machine is rebuilt a BF 20 of optimum, on ball screws
    Bild24.jpg
    The lathe is from the same manufacturer
    Bild25.jpg
    the small lathe is a lorch-replica
    Bild4.jpg
    my main machine, a Lienhard engraving machine

    best regards,
    Dieter
     
  13. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hallo,
    Today I want to show you how I made my wheels.
    Bild3.jpg


    [FONT=&quot][/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot] a thornton-milling cutters was used.
    Bild1.jpg


    [/FONT]
    as the first part, we installed the Rotary Table and aligned to the center of the spindle
    Bild9.jpg



    the stencil is mounted on the template table
    Bild10.jpg



    [FONT=&quot]it[/FONT][FONT=&quot] is worked out with the template just a segment of the wheel, so will continue to share some of the required table
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot][/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot] schut to the rotary table is a wood panel-mounted
    Bild11.jpg


    [/FONT]
    the plate can be screwed directly onto the wood board
    Bild12.jpg



    The processing is performed with a depth infeed of 0.2 mm in the concurrent
    Bild13.jpg
    3468.jpg




    the round table is broken down by the engraving machine and mounted on the BF20 milling-machine
    [FONT=&quot]the[/FONT][FONT=&quot] round table is aligned to the center of the milling spindle and the wood panel reattached[/FONT]
    3486.jpg


    the wheel blank piece is screwed by means of pressure on the wood board
    3489.jpg



    the wheel blank is milled around with oversize
    3490.jpg

    3493.jpg

    3494.jpg

    3495.jpg

    3497.jpg



    Next time I will show the interlocking of wheels

    best regards
    Dieter







    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]


    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
     
  14. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello,
    the machined with oversize wheels are fixed with very stable holding mandrel and bolted.
    3501.jpg 3504.jpg


    The mandrel is used in the rotating machine aligned with concentric and the outer diameter of the blank is rotated to measure.
    3508.jpg


    the shape, tooth cutters we set to center round table, with the help of a skribing block
    Bild20.jpg


    the teeth are machined in the same run in one section, with a minute speed of 2,000 revolutions
    Bild22.jpg Bild21.jpg


    Dieter
     
  15. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Hello Dieter,

    Thank you for your updates and excellent photos to go with the care you are taking with your project.

    Do you have or can you point me to the description Stephan Gagneux has of his experiment(s). I would like to understand just how he went about arriving at his assertion of the ball bearing advantage.

    Thank you for your consideration.
     
  16. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
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  17. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi all,

    Today I continued to work on the engraved pawls
    Order to reduce the contact surface and thus the friction, the pawls on both sides is turned back to a diameter.
    4315.jpg


    order to facilitate the running of brass bush 58 has been rotated. The large diameter is 3mm, the small 2mm and a length of 3mm.
    4318.jpg


    The cans still get a flare for the screw head.
    4326.jpg 4321.jpg 4323.jpg 4325.jpg


    The screws are purchased model drywall screws, which are later replaced by more self-made screws.
    The screw head fits into the bush.
    4329.jpg


    At the Second rifle I was not paying attention and I turned in the distance for the screw head too low. Tough luck.
    4334.jpg


    Have a nice weekend,
    Dieter
     
  18. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi Jim,
    I will write to him and ask Stephan send you his results. I can not ship without his OK. I hope you have this understanding.

    regards,
    Dieter
     
  19. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello,

    here are some pictures for gravity drive.

    4348.jpg 4339.jpg 4346.jpg

    regards,
    Dieter
     
  20. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi all,

    I just got back to some work on my precision pendulum clock. Here are some pictures.

    4375.jpg 4363.jpg 4369.jpg 4373.jpg

    Dieter
     
  21. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi all,
    I have built further back on the clock and fined the individual parts of the gravity drive something.
    Since it's too cold in my basement, I went into my study. To protect the furniture I've edited a simple board. Here are some pictures.

    4389.jpg 4378.jpg 4379.jpg 4380.jpg 4382.jpg

    Best regards,
    Dieter
     
  22. Allan Wolff

    Allan Wolff Moderator
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    Dieter,
    Excellent work as usual. Your setup for indoor work looks very functional. Even though I now have a heated shop, I still like to do wheel crossing and final assembly in the study. A comfortable chair, good lighting and some background music make a tedious job much more enjoyable.
    Thank you for sharing your project with us,
    Allan
     
  23. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hallo all,

    I have a long time to work on the next clock finally back. I finished the gravity drive.
    The recesses were milled for the auxiliary drive of the elevator in the roller wheel.
    IMG_4978.JPG IMG_4981.JPG

    Next, the pins had to be rotated and pressed to the auxiliary drive.
    IMG_4984.JPG IMG_4987.JPG IMG_4993.JPG

    After cleaning everything could be fitted together. It worked very well at first.
    IMG_4989.JPG IMG_5014.JPG

    best regards
    Dieter from Frankonia
     
  24. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hallo all,
    I processed today, the boards of some clock. So I can see the whole better, being only a Plexiglas was used as a second board. However, this is later replaced with a 6mm thick brass plate.

    IMG_5020.JPG IMG_5021.JPG

    Best regards,
    Dieter
     
  25. NorCal Stan

    NorCal Stan Registered User

    Jun 29, 2013
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    Dieter, please update us with your progress these past two months. Vielen dank! :)
     
  26. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi there,
    Unfortunately, I did not come in the last two months very far with my pendulum clock. I'm going to change the place of residence and therefore had to do a lot of other things. Once the move is complete and I can work in the workshop again, I like writing as the clock continues going.

    Best regards,
    Dieter
     
  27. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hi there,

    after a long time I'll be report back to. I have changed the place of residence during the period of absence, was ill for longer and have the need to set up workshop again. But now it's finally back on with the construction of the clock. Here are some pictures from the new workshop.
    IMG_5431.JPG IMG_5418.JPG IMG_5419.JPG IMG_5420.JPG IMG_5421.JPG IMG_5422.JPG IMG_5424.JPG IMG_5425.JPG IMG_5428.JPG IMG_5429.JPG IMG_5430.JPG

    Best regards,
    Dieter
     
  28. Duplex48

    Duplex48 New Member

    May 16, 2013
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    Hi Dieter,
    your new shop looks pretty good, also very good equipped and professional!
    Greetz
    Duplex
     
  29. ccwk

    ccwk Registered User
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    Hi Dieter,
    Hope you have settled in, your new shop looks to good to mess up ! - but we hope you are making progress on your clock
    Kind Regards Conwae
     
  30. teslak

    teslak Registered User

    Dec 30, 2012
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    Hello friends of the clock making
    The last two weeks I spent with the preparation of the escapement. For this I had a model made of 2mm brass scale 4 first: 1 Saw. To facilitate my work, I have drawn the anchor in CAD, enlarged to the corresponding dimension and printed on the printer. The paper then glued with spray adhesive on the sheet and cut out.
    b1.jpg

    [FONT=&quot]With the[/FONT][FONT=&quot] jigsaw was the cut relatively quickly and it did not need so many blades suffer.[/FONT]
    b2.jpg
    [FONT=&quot]As you can see[/FONT][FONT=&quot] is for me while working "order and cleanliness" paramount, sometimes anyway. [/FONT]:D
    b3.jpg

    [FONT=&quot]Since I had no aluminum plate in the appropriate size more at the time, had to suffice a plywood board in the size A4. With the hold-down the wooden plate is secured to the template table.[/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
    b4.jpg

    As the base material, I have a hard disk MS58 with a thickness of 3mm used. To be a little freer, a wooden plate is mounted on the machine table on which I attach the brass plate with "Spax screws".
    The delivery of the cutter is done in 0.2 mm increments, at a speed of 9,000 rpm and a cutter diameter of 1.5mm.
    b5.jpg

    Here's a look at my "new acquisition" a cover G1L engraving with relatively large pantograph.
    b6.jpg

    [FONT=&quot]In the template,[/FONT][FONT=&quot] the holes were drilled with the same marks, and so that means centering the centers of the later holes are set.[/FONT]
    b7.jpg

    In the next step, the grooves has been inserted for the pallets on the small Lorch-lathe. But I made myself a small device. The disc has the same, so you have to bring only the piercing steel at the edge of the diameter of the inner edge and thus has the same positions the steel properly and dimensionally stable. The piercing steel was 0.5 mm smaller than the pallet width sanded and then moved sideways, as long was to move up the sample palette without play in the groove. Luckily, I've cut out a number of "exercise anchor", so that this operation could be sufficiently practiced.
    b8.jpg


    [FONT=&quot]After the insertion of[/FONT][FONT=&quot] the threaded holes of the grooves were placed and cut. That went better than I expected.[/FONT]
    b9.jpg b10.jpg

    Thanks for all,
    Dieter
     

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