Broken Pendulum on Kieninger 400 Day

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Bates, Mar 16, 2019.

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  1. Bates

    Bates Registered User

    Feb 6, 2013
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    The regulator nut on a Kieninger 400-day I’m working on is not moving the balls in or out. In fact, the nut isn’t turning anything. I took off the hook for the suspension spring bottom bracket. It seems that there is an inner collar (not sure of terminology) that is supposed to be peened or riveted onto the nut and it is loose in this case. Is this correct? If so, how can I fix it? I’ve attached a photo, which hopefully will explain what I mean. The arrow is pointing to what looks like the peened lip. When I turn the not, this does not turn and I’m assuming it should. And yes, I’ve also removed two of the balls.

    Thanks

    654D2853-AB90-4793-96A6-A2BDEFAD5106.jpeg
     
  2. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    Nov 16, 2011
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    #2 Harry Hopkins, Mar 16, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019
    Yours may be a little different style than this one but the large round knurled knob should be solidly attached to the threaded rod. Mine appears to be one piece but I suspect the knurled knob is staked onto the rod. It looks like someone has tried to peen the knob back onto the rod on your pendulum without success. If you unscrew and remove the threaded rod completely it will make it easier to attempt a better staking job. If that does not work you might try knurling the end of the rod where the knob sits to raise some brass to make it a tighter fit. As a last resort the knob could be soldered onto the rod. image000000 (81).jpg image000000 (82).jpg image000000 (83).jpg image000000 (84).jpg
     
  3. Bates

    Bates Registered User

    Feb 6, 2013
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    Thanks Harry. I was able to tighten the knob to the rod quite a bit by tapping a punch into it. The problem is that it still wasn’t tight enough because the threaded piece that holds the balls is stuck or jammed or frozen tight at the top of the rod. I think I can get the knob tight enough by staking or using the punch as I did if I can loosen the piece that holds the balls.

    Is there a safe way to grip the threaded end of the rod without damaging the threads so I can give the piece a good turn or tap to loosen it?

    If not, I guess I’ll have to completely ‘unstake’ the part that goes into the knob and see if I can grip the rod enough once the knob is off.
     
  4. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    I would spray some penetrating oil on the frozen rod in hopes it will soak in enough to loosen whatever has it held tight. Give it a day after spraying before trying again. If that fails you may have to remove the knob so you can hold the rod tightly while trying to turn it out. I have an old leather belt that I would wrap around the threads and put it in a vice or use some pliers.... BUT... the rod is hollow so if you have to use the leather and vice trick it would be necessary to find a scrap piece of brass rod that will fit snugly in the hollow rod so it does not get smashed.... the threaded rod has pretty thin walls so better to be safe than sorry.
     
  5. Bates

    Bates Registered User

    Feb 6, 2013
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    Thank you very much, Harry. The penetrating oil, leather, and brass rod advice did the trick!

    Last night, before my previous note, I tried WD40 to loosen it and tried using a rag in the vice, but it seemed way to risky to get a tight enough grip in the vice. Today, I put some liquid wrench on it, used an old piece of leather belt, and used the rod inside and was able to hold it tightly enough in the vice without damage. I think it had been a long time since the clock was used and someone had turned the regulating nut tightly all the way to the slow position.

    Thanks again
     
  6. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    Glad it worked out for you. Were you able to get the knob securely staked back onto the rod?
     
  7. Bates

    Bates Registered User

    Feb 6, 2013
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    Yes, I was able to get the knob securely staked.

    Now that I have it all back together I think I know why the regulating knob was left all the way in the slow position. The clock is running fast even with it all the way up there. Someone probably turned it all the way and kept turning. When that didn’t work, they probably stopped using the clock. I have a new suspension spring on order in case the one currently on the clock is the wrong thickness. Also, one of the balls seems to be bent inward more than the others, which I suppose could make it run fast. Before messing with that, I thought I’d wait for the new spring.
     

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