Brillie Brillie Magnetic Coil

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by DJDUNKY, Apr 7, 2015.

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  1. DJDUNKY

    DJDUNKY Registered User

    Mar 24, 2015
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    Hi All,

    I have a Brillie electric Dunlop station master clock and the coil wire is very loose. Firstly can this wire be purchased and secondly does anyone know the number of turns that the coil should have.

    Thanks

    Duncan
     
  2. DJDUNKY

    DJDUNKY Registered User

    Mar 24, 2015
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  3. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Is the coil failing? Why do you want to rewind it?
    Is it cloth covered copper wire?
    Tinker Dwight
     
  4. DJDUNKY

    DJDUNKY Registered User

    Mar 24, 2015
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    Hi Tinker,

    The coil looks to have seen better days. It is very loose around the core and also has some of the cloth missing where the pendulum magnet has touched it due to an incorrect spring being used.
     
  5. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    What gauge is the wire. I found a place that has
    30 gauge but that is small. I'm not sure that will be
    what you want.
    You may have to make a winder to do it your self.
    Not a fun job.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  6. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2011
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    Before making a new coil, have you determined that there is something electrically wrong with what you have?

    David
     
  7. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    I agree with David.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  8. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    DKDUNKY's concern about his Brillie's solenoid being "loose around the core and also has some of the cloth missing where the pendulum magnet has touched it" and his want to repair is of some concern.

    Firstly, let's be sure the Brillie or Dunlop master clock is of the type and style shown in this photo so we can all be on the same page.
    Brillie on wall cover on 4x6.jpg
    On the example in the above photo, the solenoid coil appears to be made of cotton-covered copper wire. It is possible that failure of the suspension would cause the magnet below the bob would allow the magnet pole to rub on the solenoid wire but only if the pendulum was not removed prior to transporting the broken clock over a bumpy road. The Brillie clock will not operate if the magnet pole rubs or touches the solenoid.

    He asks, where to purchase the wire and how many turns are required. The DC resistance of the coil is approximately 1200 ohms which would suggest a very small wire.....likely the same as used on the Bulle clock solenoid. The wire appears to be silk covered but likely has spliced flexible leads.

    I would agree with Tinker and David that any attempt to repair or construct a new winding is a task that should be offered to a commercial coil winding facility. It is not something to be undertaken without the proper coil-fabricating tooling.
     
  9. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Do you think is was a single layer or a double layer of silk?
    Most cotton covered wire has two layers with the wind in
    opposite directions.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  10. sophiebear0_0

    sophiebear0_0 Registered User

    Nov 5, 2012
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    #10 sophiebear0_0, Apr 18, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    I am not familiar with the Brillie clock coils - but I do have quite a lot of experience with both Bulle and ATO coils. These use enamelled wire which in the case of some Bulle clocks is covered by a silk winding (purely cosmetic).

    I would agree with the comments about electrically testing what you have before embarking on re-winding a coil. That said I think anyone with soldering skill and patience would be capable of rewinding a coil.

    If you take that route, I would strongly advice purchasing a hand coil winder (ca £30). I use 42 AGW enamelled wire (0.063mm) for ATO coils. It takes around 4000-5000 turns to get 1200 ohms. It does take a little patience, and you may need a couple of attempts. But initial outlay is not that great - and its nice to have the capability if you have an interest in acquiring more electromagnetic clocks.

    Again to recap, I don't know the specifics for the Brillie but hopefully someone on the forum with be able to furnish you with the specifics if you decide to go that route. Gook luck !

    Regards, Peter
     
  11. DJDUNKY

    DJDUNKY Registered User

    Mar 24, 2015
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    Hi all,

    Many thanks for your responses. Apologies for not replying sooner but I have been away.

    I have attached a picture of the coil to show you what I mean. I have taken a reading of the resistance and it's reading 740 ohms!
    COIL.jpg COIL2.jpg
     
  12. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    You might want to coat the bare stretches of wire
    with a clear lacquer.
    I would unwind the first layer and coat the exposed
    sections.
    740 ohms sounds too high. I'd think it
    would be less than 100 ohms. I wonder if
    the coil is open and it has a built in shunt resistor?
    I wouldn't use 42 gauge wire. It looks to be 30 to 34
    someplace ( measure the diameter ).
    This is not an ATO clock.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  13. praezis

    praezis Registered User

    Feb 11, 2008
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    740 Ohms is ok. My Brillie coil has exactly the same resistance.

    Frank
     
  14. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Thanks frank
    I was just about to ask him for the weight of the windings as
    well. With that and the wire diameter, one can estimate the total
    resistance.
    It is mostly now just protecting the wires from shorting.
    Although, it is a DC pulse, any shorts can slow the rise time
    of the magnetic field. Once he has a thin layer of lacquer on
    the wires and tightened the winds, he can maybe either rotate
    how it is mounted ( may not be possible with the wire holes )
    or use some acrylic paints to simulate the covering.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  15. sophiebear0_0

    sophiebear0_0 Registered User

    Nov 5, 2012
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    Just resurrecting an old thread that I thought would benefit from a few more details.

    I have just taken delivery of a Brillie wall clock. Before it arrived I though I needed to raid my spares in case the coil was damaged. As it turned out all was fine. However I do have a badly damaged coil that may provide some useful info:

    1) The coil resistance is approx 750 ohms as noted in previous posts
    2) The cloth covered wire is 0.4 mm diameter
    3) It looks like there are 2 layers of the cloth covered wire
    4) The coil is wound with 42 AWG enamelled wire (my best estimate with my vernier)
    5) The coil former centre is no magnetic metal (presumably aluminium) and has id of 17 mm with od 18 mm
    6) The former outer is actually made from around 5 layers of thin waxed card. The od/id of the layers are 42 mm & 36 mm
    7) Coil length is 42 mm

    Its hard to believe, but the pictured coil still reads 750 ohms. However I don't think i would risk using it without a total re-wind.

    Regards,

    Peter

    Brillie coil 1.JPG Brillie coil 2.JPG
     
    swolf likes this.

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