• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Brillie Brillie Magnetic Coil

DJDUNKY

Registered User
Mar 24, 2015
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Hi All,

I have a Brillie electric Dunlop station master clock and the coil wire is very loose. Firstly can this wire be purchased and secondly does anyone know the number of turns that the coil should have.

Thanks

Duncan
 

DJDUNKY

Registered User
Mar 24, 2015
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Hi Tinker,

The coil looks to have seen better days. It is very loose around the core and also has some of the cloth missing where the pendulum magnet has touched it due to an incorrect spring being used.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
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What gauge is the wire. I found a place that has
30 gauge but that is small. I'm not sure that will be
what you want.
You may have to make a winder to do it your self.
Not a fun job.
Tinker Dwight
 

David S

NAWCC Member
Dec 18, 2011
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Before making a new coil, have you determined that there is something electrically wrong with what you have?

David
 

eskmill

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Aug 24, 2000
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DKDUNKY's concern about his Brillie's solenoid being "loose around the core and also has some of the cloth missing where the pendulum magnet has touched it" and his want to repair is of some concern.

Firstly, let's be sure the Brillie or Dunlop master clock is of the type and style shown in this photo so we can all be on the same page.
Brillie on wall cover on 4x6.jpg
On the example in the above photo, the solenoid coil appears to be made of cotton-covered copper wire. It is possible that failure of the suspension would cause the magnet below the bob would allow the magnet pole to rub on the solenoid wire but only if the pendulum was not removed prior to transporting the broken clock over a bumpy road. The Brillie clock will not operate if the magnet pole rubs or touches the solenoid.

He asks, where to purchase the wire and how many turns are required. The DC resistance of the coil is approximately 1200 ohms which would suggest a very small wire.....likely the same as used on the Bulle clock solenoid. The wire appears to be silk covered but likely has spliced flexible leads.

I would agree with Tinker and David that any attempt to repair or construct a new winding is a task that should be offered to a commercial coil winding facility. It is not something to be undertaken without the proper coil-fabricating tooling.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
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Calif. USA
Do you think is was a single layer or a double layer of silk?
Most cotton covered wire has two layers with the wind in
opposite directions.
Tinker Dwight
 

sophiebear0_0

Registered User
Nov 5, 2012
93
19
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I am not familiar with the Brillie clock coils - but I do have quite a lot of experience with both Bulle and ATO coils. These use enamelled wire which in the case of some Bulle clocks is covered by a silk winding (purely cosmetic).

I would agree with the comments about electrically testing what you have before embarking on re-winding a coil. That said I think anyone with soldering skill and patience would be capable of rewinding a coil.

If you take that route, I would strongly advice purchasing a hand coil winder (ca £30). I use 42 AGW enamelled wire (0.063mm) for ATO coils. It takes around 4000-5000 turns to get 1200 ohms. It does take a little patience, and you may need a couple of attempts. But initial outlay is not that great - and its nice to have the capability if you have an interest in acquiring more electromagnetic clocks.

Again to recap, I don't know the specifics for the Brillie but hopefully someone on the forum with be able to furnish you with the specifics if you decide to go that route. Gook luck !

Regards, Peter
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DJDUNKY

Registered User
Mar 24, 2015
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Hi all,

Many thanks for your responses. Apologies for not replying sooner but I have been away.

I have attached a picture of the coil to show you what I mean. I have taken a reading of the resistance and it's reading 740 ohms!
COIL.jpg COIL2.jpg
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
74
0
Calif. USA
You might want to coat the bare stretches of wire
with a clear lacquer.
I would unwind the first layer and coat the exposed
sections.
740 ohms sounds too high. I'd think it
would be less than 100 ohms. I wonder if
the coil is open and it has a built in shunt resistor?
I wouldn't use 42 gauge wire. It looks to be 30 to 34
someplace ( measure the diameter ).
This is not an ATO clock.
Tinker Dwight
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
74
0
Calif. USA
Thanks frank
I was just about to ask him for the weight of the windings as
well. With that and the wire diameter, one can estimate the total
resistance.
It is mostly now just protecting the wires from shorting.
Although, it is a DC pulse, any shorts can slow the rise time
of the magnetic field. Once he has a thin layer of lacquer on
the wires and tightened the winds, he can maybe either rotate
how it is mounted ( may not be possible with the wire holes )
or use some acrylic paints to simulate the covering.
Tinker Dwight
 

sophiebear0_0

Registered User
Nov 5, 2012
93
19
8
Just resurrecting an old thread that I thought would benefit from a few more details.

I have just taken delivery of a Brillie wall clock. Before it arrived I though I needed to raid my spares in case the coil was damaged. As it turned out all was fine. However I do have a badly damaged coil that may provide some useful info:

1) The coil resistance is approx 750 ohms as noted in previous posts
2) The cloth covered wire is 0.4 mm diameter
3) It looks like there are 2 layers of the cloth covered wire
4) The coil is wound with 42 AWG enamelled wire (my best estimate with my vernier)
5) The coil former centre is no magnetic metal (presumably aluminium) and has id of 17 mm with od 18 mm
6) The former outer is actually made from around 5 layers of thin waxed card. The od/id of the layers are 42 mm & 36 mm
7) Coil length is 42 mm

Its hard to believe, but the pictured coil still reads 750 ohms. However I don't think i would risk using it without a total re-wind.

Regards,

Peter

Brillie coil 1.JPG Brillie coil 2.JPG
 
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