Brass dial clock with engraved scene

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Lightwood House, Jul 1, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Lightwood House

    Lightwood House Registered User

    Jun 28, 2019
    37
    5
    8
    Male
    Country Flag:
    I know I have been posting a lot, but just joined and am catching up. Some of you may have seen this clock on ebay. When advertised, I assumed it had been separated from its case long ago, and planned to make a new one for it. I was pleased with it when it arrived, especially the engraved scene. I am thinking it is circa 1760’s. I contacted the seller to ask if he had any idea on what the case looked liked, and he said he had the original case, so he separated the clock and case to sell separately from each other. I asked how much shipping would be for the case, and it would have been around $900.00 . With the price of the case and shipping I couldn’t afford to buy it and have it shipped. Had I known it had been separated just to make a few more pounds I would not have purchased it on principle. It is only a 10 inch dial, and the photo of the oak case looked very nice. I would have thought that a small clock with such an evocative scene would have sold well together as a whole, unless the engraving is a fake. The movement is in pretty good shape. If I come into some extra cash I might contact him to see if he still has it. If not, I will copy the original case. Live and learn.

    E16BD9B0-A3EE-4277-A694-A5544304A6A3.jpeg E0BA8A8F-CFBA-4C14-9687-9EC22D3FFB0A.jpeg
     
    Dave T likes this.
  2. Lightwood House

    Lightwood House Registered User

    Jun 28, 2019
    37
    5
    8
    Male
    Country Flag:
    Ps - The case had a flat top with blind fretting. Sorry about the cut off photo
     
  3. jmclaugh

    jmclaugh Registered User

    Jun 1, 2006
    4,173
    66
    48
    Devon
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Does seem odd to split them. It is a nicely engraved dial though the hands are oversized and an earlier style than the dial, a date of around 1760 looks right.

    Presumably there is no name on it dial, is it square or arched? Pics of the movement would be of interest.
     
  4. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
    8,881
    410
    83
    Male
    retired and on my second career
    Dorset
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    If you bought it in Devon from Torquay he does that all the time (and worse)

    I would say later than 1760, it is a provincial dial clock, with an unusual choice of engraving for the central scene. Ships and the coast were very popular and command higher prices now.
     
  5. Clockwise123

    Clockwise123 Registered User

    Jun 18, 2019
    23
    4
    3
    Male
    Country Flag:
    This sort of thing is happening too often now. In the UK complete clocks, such as the one pictured, struggle to make a couple of hundred pounds. Some individuals have no concern breaking something up which has been around for a couple of hundred years or more. Some of these people then start breaking them down further selling bell, hands, spandrels etc. This destruction was similar, I am told, in the post war years though back then the full clock would have been scrapped. I do hope this practice stops but who knows when ordinary country longcase clocks will be seen as desirable again?
     
  6. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
    8,881
    410
    83
    Male
    retired and on my second career
    Dorset
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    What is distressing is that some of the people doing this claim to love clocks.

    I will divorce and remarry a clock but I would never break up a complete clock that was in an original case. I have, however, broken up inappropriate marriages and improved them.
     
  7. Clockwise123

    Clockwise123 Registered User

    Jun 18, 2019
    23
    4
    3
    Male
    Country Flag:
    Absolutely. Correcting an unhappy marriage or even breaking a poor made up clock is perfectly acceptable.
    The problem comes when you feel obliged to save an original clock you don`t want but feel sorry for. You don`t want or need it, or likely ever to restore it, but end up with it - or is that just me?
     
  8. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
    8,881
    410
    83
    Male
    retired and on my second career
    Dorset
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    no, that's me too
     
  9. Lightwood House

    Lightwood House Registered User

    Jun 28, 2019
    37
    5
    8
    Male
    Country Flag:
    I think that those dealers who break up an original clock to sell piece by piece are nothing more than vandals. Of course, I agree-changing around and improving a bad marriage is perfectly fine in my book. But this was a charming clock, with a charming scene, and nice case surviving intact from the 18th century. It might not be an "important" clock to high-end collectors, but to me, any decent clock that has survived intact from the 17th or 18th century is important. It was certainly important to the first owners, who took great pride in it, and it certainly would be important to me if I owned it.
    I hope, as novicetimekeeper referenced, that these ordinary country clocks will once again become desirable. But to take it a step further, I also hope that a love of history and its material culture in general will increase in the future as well.
     
  10. Lightwood House

    Lightwood House Registered User

    Jun 28, 2019
    37
    5
    8
    Male
    Country Flag:
    Sorry- I meant Clockwise 123's reference to the desirability of ordinary country clocks.
     

Share This Page