Brand you collect most

Patrick Brady

Registered User
NAWCC Member
May 20, 2019
14
28
13
Country
Region
The post on Factory Hamilton Cases got me thinking about my short collecting journey. I'm new to pocket watches and went into it thinking I'd be collecting mostly Hamilton RR grades. My first was a Hamilton 950 bought at an estate jewelry store in Charleston, SC. It was a random find that set me on my path, and I absolutely would not part with it. After a year and a half, however, I find myself with more Illinois, Elgin, and Waltham than Hamilton. Part of the reason is that I'm fascinated with watches from the 1860's. I'm still a huge fan of Hamilton and have added a few since the 950. My question is what brand do you collect most and why?

IMG_0521.jpg IMG_0529.jpg
 

John Cote

Director
Director
NAWCC Member
Aug 26, 2000
4,308
696
113
Midwest USA
www.interstatetime.com
Country
I probably have more Illinois in my collection but after 45 years collecting what I find is that I have a bunch of little collections in the safe deposit box. I have 3 finger bridge Elgins, 12 size high grades in their boxes, 18s early Waltham Vanguards, Marked 18s Hamiltons...on and on. I collect what I like at the time and keep fleshing it out. From time to time I sell off what is no longer interesting.
 

Rick Hufnagel

Just Rick!
NAWCC Member
Donor
Oct 25, 2018
1,855
2,737
113
36
Pittsburgh pa
Country
Region
Well.... I've always been an Elgin guy at heart. I've turned more towards the first ten years of the company however.
Why? My first watch is an Elgin, and have been fascinated with them ever since.

I don't think limiting myself to a certain manufacturer is a black and white thing, I love many earlier american companies, but by the numbers and what I put the most time into studying, Elgin is the first on the list.

Here's the 18s side of the "tower of watches". A buddy gave me some of these cases and I fitted hooks to this one to display the elgins. 18s on this side, 16 and below on the other. Oh... And it spins.... :D. Sorry I just had to post it... Couldn't help myself.


If you want to go by what I'm willing to spend the most money on.... I'd go crazy over a good New York Watch Co.
 

musicguy

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Donor
Jan 12, 2017
6,601
3,339
113
New York State
Country
I collect what I like at the time and keep fleshing it out. From time to time I sell off what is no longer interesting.
Me too

There is at least one person on this forum that I know
who has every Hamilton pocket watch grade that was made(in all sizes I believe).
In fact multiples of many of them. That is very impressive and
must have taken quite a while to accomplish.

I have many collections of different watch companies(like John said above)
but I did start with Elgin and probably have more of them
than other companies( a lot of BWR's in all three sizes).


Rob
 
Last edited:

Brad Maisto

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Oct 1, 2000
728
191
43
66
Grandview, IN
Country
Region
Patrick,
Interesting thread as my wife is taking me to Charleston this coming September and I plan to hit a few of the “estate” jewelry places in that old city! And to answer your question, I am fairly sure the bulk of my collection are Elgin’s! Probably many reasons why that is so, but like Mr. Cote, my collecting interests have varied over time as well (going on 25 years now). The big auction site has definitely influenced my collecting, making watches all over this planet accessible! But it certainly has been a fun hobby, many interesting characters seem to collect the same things I do, which makes this hobby that much more enjoyable, even if prices have plummeted!
Good luck in your collecting endeavors! Brad Maisto, KY Floral #44 Secretary
 

Tim Fitzgerald

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Jan 2, 2016
783
484
63
Oak island North Carolina
timothyfitzgerald.net
Country
Region
Nice tower,
Well.... I've always been an Elgin guy at heart. I've turned more towards the first ten years of the company however.
Why? My first watch is an Elgin, and have been fascinated with them ever since.

I don't think limiting myself to a certain manufacturer is a black and white thing, I love many earlier american companies, but by the numbers and what I put the most time into studying, Elgin is the first on the list.

Here's the 18s side of the "tower of watches". A buddy gave me some of these cases and I fitted hooks to this one to display the elgins. 18s on this side, 16 and below on the other. Oh... And it spins.... :D. Sorry I just had to post it... Couldn't help myself.


If you want to go by what I'm willing to spend the most money on.... I'd go crazy over a good New York Watch Co.
 

Keith R...

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Nov 27, 2012
5,765
2,470
113
South
Country
Region
I wound up with a few 1860's watches, but if I had it to do over, I'd be deep
into United States Watch Co. of Marion NJ, or the Illinois Watch Co.

Keith R...

103_7811 (800x600).jpg 103_6591 (800x600).jpg 103_6640 (800x600).jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: kevin h and viclip

OldSchool1959

Seaboard Coastline RR Fanatic!
NAWCC Member
Jan 8, 2018
187
117
43
61
Rolesville NC
Country
Region
Right now I have more Illinois, but I prefer Hamilton’s due to my grandfather who carried one on the RR.
 

Dave Coatsworth

Senior Administrator
NAWCC Business
NAWCC Fellow
Feb 11, 2005
7,614
2,278
113
61
Camarillo, CA
www.daveswatchparts.com
Country
Region
Illinois private labels. The 18-size models 1,2,3 are absolutely beautiful to me and I enjoy the added aspect of researching the retailers. It gives a glimpse of life and retailing back in the day. I have a special focus on the jeweled 5th pinion model 3. Have about 50 of them in my collection now.

IllinoisShadowBox.jpg Illinois500926Mvmt.jpg
 

Ethan Lipsig

Registered User
NAWCC Gold Member
Jan 8, 2006
2,233
1,651
113
71
Pasadena
Country
Region
I have significant collections of about a dozen brands, the top one of which is C.H. Meylan. I got interested in C.H. Meylan early in my collecting when I bought a very nice one on eBay that turned out to have been stolen. I was very happy to restore it to its owner, for whom it was a treasured family heirloom. No longer having it, I had to get another one. Being obsessive, that led to another and another, which is why I now have 44.

Other key factors that have shaped my collecting are price, variety, and availability. If I could find more good examples of, e.g., Louis Audemars or Haas Neveux, and afford them, I would have more of them.

Here is the percentage composition of my collection.

18% Misc. not listed below
11% C.H. Meylan
10% Elgin
10% Waltham
9% IWC
8% Illinois
6.5% Touchon
5% Hamilton
4% Vacheron & Constantin
3% Patek Philippe
2% P. Ditisheim
2% H.E. Ekegren
2% Gruen
1.5% Poitevin
1% Louis Audemars
1% C. Frodsham
1% Haas Neveux
1% Howard
1% Keystone-Howard
1% Koehn
1% Louis Leroy
1% Tiffany
 

GeneJockey

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Mar 2, 2012
1,615
646
113
San Francisco Peninsula
gjselgins.blogspot.com
Country
Region
Elgins for me.

I started out defining my collection as Elgin wrist watches from their last 10 years of US movement production, then expanded that to the last 30 years, with the goal of getting one working watch of every men's wristwatch grade of the 8/0, 15/0, and 13/0 grades.

Then expanded that to include their 10s pocket watches from 1942 on.

Then expanded that to include their 16s pocket watches from 1946 on.

Then expanded that to include their 'Streamline' 12 pocket watches from the 1920s.

Then expanded that to include the last 4 grades of railroad pocket watches, i.e. the ones made after 1940 (478, 540, 590, 571)

Then expanded to include just one pre-Elgin keywind.

Then expanded that to include every one of the keywind 'Name Grades'.

Then expanded that to include the first stemwind versions of the Name Grades

Then expanded to include getting a 571 from the early, middle, and late stages of its production life.

Then, for reasons I don't understand, to getting 4 Lord Elgin 'Aquamaster' watches from just before Elgin as a company collapsed to nothing but a name and set of trademarks.

Also 4 Bulova and 6 Hamilton wrist watches, and 6 Hamilton pocket watches.
 

Lee Passarella

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Jul 8, 2015
365
542
93
Country
Region
This is an interesting topic, and I hope more folks will respond. I thought I had an idea what some respondents collect, but I find I really had no idea. I guess Elgin and Hamilton are the most favored, followed by Illinois. I'm surprised no one so far mentioned Waltham. At all.

When I started collecting, I read that Rockfords were very collectible for a couple of reasons (fewer made, valued by old railroaders), so I gravitated to them. Howards, also, were recommended in terms of limited production and quality. So I concentrated on both brands but bought rather indiscriminately, so I ended up with a lot of old watches that aren't worth much, though all of them do run and keep time. So that's a plus.

I'm acquisitive, so I'm not ready to jettison anything yet, though I may do so out of necessity if I continue to pursue this baffling hobby. I still gravitate toward brands that were produced in much fewer quantities than the Elgins, Walthams, or Hamiltons.

The forum, for example, has introduced me to Springfield Hampdens, New York Watch Co. (Springfield), U. S. Watch Co. (Marion), Termont/Melrose, and a couple other fast-fading brands I think I'll pick up as I take a break from Rockfords and Howards.
 

Jerry Treiman

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Aug 25, 2000
6,463
2,031
113
Los Angeles, CA
Country
Region
My preference has been, overwhelmingly, Waltham. When I started collecting I was just a poor teenager, and then a poor college student. Walthams were plentiful (read that as more affordable), offered a lot of variety and quality, and spare parts were readily available (making restoration easier). I have branched out some. A focus on 12-size watches (also affordable for a young collector) led me to examples from all of the American companies, but I keep coming back to small niche collecting within Waltham such as the Riverside grade, certain private-label models, specially-cased Waltham models, and contract watches for E. Howard & Co.

My next largest collection would be Illinois (12-size).
 

Patrick Brady

Registered User
NAWCC Member
May 20, 2019
14
28
13
Country
Region
Thanks everyone for your replies. I'm encouraged to know this journey has a winding path for others as well. I've learned there are many treasures in all the American brands - for example, like John I'm a big fan of 3 finger bridges.
 

Jerry Treiman

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Aug 25, 2000
6,463
2,031
113
Los Angeles, CA
Country
Region
Some lovely 3-finger bridge models were made by several companies. That could be a nice focus, in itself.
 

PatH

Registered User
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 5, 2014
1,915
1,363
113
Texas
Country
Region
Early Ingersolls, particularly back wind and set, souvenir, advertising and private label. Have been known to add other early dollar watches in the same categories.
 

diveboy

Registered User
NAWCC Member
May 25, 2014
142
233
43
Melbourne, Australia
elgin.watch
Country
I started with the Elgin Parisiennes, yeh I'm weird, started with a ladies collection, that lead to the horizons and thin-thins, then I found the electronics and well enough said there before I annoy too many people.

Then I found the lack of documented history of ENWCo or more should I say, in-factual, untruthful and just our right rubbish published about ENWCo, so I have kinda morphed from just collecting watches to significant pieces of elgins production history, like relays, microphones, elasped timers, items from the factory, staff awards, items related to NWCo/ENWCo achievements, events and other random things.

along the way, I've added from B. W. Raymond #198 to the very last design of grade out of Plant 1, my current focus is English exports and bringing the history of that chapter of NWCo/ENWCo to light.

Where to from here ? the sky knows but knowing ENWCo the way I have learnt to know them, I wouldn't be surprised if I find something from the late 20s early 30s like the radio set watch and jump into that or the 50s solar watch, both largely unexplored chapters from ENWCo.
 

Leigh Callaway

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Sep 5, 2011
158
253
63
Upper Valley, New Hampshire
Country
Region
Hamilton.
Partly because I used a 4992B as a Navy patrol plane navigator in the late sixties.
Partly because of the abundance of NAWCC documentation.
Mostly because of Hamilton's response to the Naval Observatory in 1942.

(Edit: I should add that it confines the scope of the hobby, which - in my case - might otherwise spiral to obsessive nonsense)
 
Last edited:

musicguy

Moderator
NAWCC Member
Donor
Jan 12, 2017
6,601
3,339
113
New York State
Country
Leigh Callaway Wrote: Mostly because of Hamilton's response to the Naval Observatory in 1942
In case some people don't know what Leigh is referencing

"Anticipating the arrival of war, the U.S. Naval Observatory had asked American domestic watch manufacturers in 1939 for their participation in mass-producing chronometers. Domestic watch manufacturers Hamilton and Elgin agreed to undertake the design and production, but only Hamilton’s product met Navy accuracy requirements. Hamilton delivered two prototypes to the Navy on 27 February 1942, which passed with an error rate of 1.55 seconds per day. The firm went on during the war to mass-produce 8900 more chronometers for the Navy, 1500 for merchant shipping and 500 for the Army. Between 1942 and 1944, the price dropped from $625 to $390 per timekeeper." (Quoted From the National Museum of American History Website Behring Center)
Hamilton No. 1 Box Chronometer



Rob
 

Jim Haney

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Sep 21, 2002
6,735
1,466
113
71
Decatur, TN.
Country
Region
When I started collecting in the early 1990's, I didn't know what to collect, so I bought everything I ran across, after a few years, I realized that I could not afford to collect everything,so I decided to go with one company.

By doing my own repairs & cleaning I was slowly leaning towards Hamilton because of the overall quality and ease of repairs and assembly.

So, I set a goal of collecting all of the 970 Series, and was happy to accomplish my goal without too much trouble.

Over the next 10-15 years I did find every grade and number in that grade in 18 & 16 sizes, so I started on 10& 12's and went into the Military and Chronometers.

I got into Electric wrists for a few years but they didn't hold my interest. So I have a complete Hamilton collection all sizes and grades and the Colored Plastic boxes, backed up several times.

I also like pre & civil war Waltham's:D :)This balances my Hamilton craziness;)


EDIT, I forgot to mention one of the most important thing about Hamilton's is the fact that you can check each individual serial # of the watch when sold, date and to who, up until #824,700, which automatically gives the watch provenance.
 
Last edited:

Fritz Katzenjammer

Yeah... that Fritz....
NAWCC Member
Feb 4, 2013
90
183
33
My garage usually... Burlington, Ont.
Country
Region
Dad wore a Hamilton on the engines, so it started out there. But, Illinois products are so nice, so the focus shifted...

But then we found a Waltham 92, so Waltham took over the lead, it doesn’t hurt that Waltham’s are quite common.

But it still almost all railway stuff

Now, if we were talking wristwatches, Dad wore an Omega when he made into management at the railroad, and those still rule that part of the collection.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Patrick Brady

darrahg

Moderator
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 22, 2006
1,487
527
113
Houston
Country
Region
Rockford watches are my main interest because there was so little accurate info about them (much of the good stuff was retained privately) when I started and it still remains a bit fuzzy today. Research is my main bag so picked this smaller company that deserves more attention than what has been given. Their products are of reasonably high quality and there are surprises around every corner when it comes to low production movements. I just checked and it is only mentioned once (Lee's thread) above so I picked the correct one.
I also like collecting Marion 'butterfly', Seth Thomas model 5s, Illinois Getty and anything that is attractive, especially two-tones or in muckle cases, or unique. That should do it. :emoji_sunglasses:
 

Maximus Man

Maximus Man
Jan 1, 2011
152
85
28
Country
The name says it all.
I started with different variants of 16 size Bunn Specials. I got bored, sold them, and then focused on buying 23 jewel Ball watches. That got me thru the 1970s. The market collapse in the 1980's opened the door to top of the line watches: Edward Howard, Pemier Maximus, etc...

Then two things happened - I found a loaner watch that dad carried and I bought my first Maximus - both in the old Valley Junction RR district in West Des Moines. That was the beginning of my Waltham and LOANER case addiction. Add in some important watches, historic watches, and others and that is where I am after 42 years and help from a lot of very good friends.
 

Gregory

Registered User
Dec 29, 2012
99
64
18
71
Hampton, GA
Country
Region
American Watch Co's for me........1860-1870..........amazed at how something mechanical made 160 years ago still runs true today.
I have one American Watch Co. PS Bartlett model 1857 that was made in about 1871. Like you I find these old watches amazing. Not only are they beautiful they still keep amazingly accurate time.

They were made in factories before Edison filed his first patent for a practical incandescent light bulb in 1878. It's really amazing they were able to design tiny parts like that using oil lamps or gas light to work by not to mention being able to manufacture the parts and assemble them without electric lights. They also had to be inventive running shafts and belts to run lathes and other equipment off of a central power source. Those old factories were a marvel in themselves.

Sc5EBI1.jpg

bbH7eU0.jpg
 

4thdimension

Registered User
Oct 18, 2001
2,523
214
63
Country
Region
I started picking up Waterbury Addisons when my son Addison was born. He was named for my great uncle but I thought he might like them someday. There are as many different ones as Swatches and they were dirt cheap back when(often free). My other collection is watch ephemera of all sorts. Again, it was free or cheap and fulfilled my collecting urges without interfering with my buying and selling watches. Both collections were compact and gratifying once, now they're just gratifying.-Cort
 
  • Like
Reactions: musicguy and PatH

Patrick Brady

Registered User
NAWCC Member
May 20, 2019
14
28
13
Country
Region
I have one American Watch Co. PS Bartlett model 1857 that was made in about 1871. Like you I find these old watches amazing. Not only are they beautiful they still keep amazingly accurate time.

They were made in factories before Edison filed his first patent for a practical incandescent light bulb in 1878. It's really amazing they were able to design tiny parts like that using oil lamps or gas light to work by not to mention being able to manufacture the parts and assemble them without electric lights. They also had to be inventive running shafts and belts to run lathes and other equipment off of a central power source. Those old factories were a marvel in themselves.

View attachment 536971

View attachment 536972
I hadn't really thought about the working conditions in quite that way, but you make some great points which make me appreciate these marvels even more. I got really lucky (I think) in finding a model 1857 P.S. Bartlett from 1860 in very good condition. Took some work from my watchmaker to get it running reasonably well, but it's a prize in my collection. Thanks for sharing your pics. Beautiful watch.

s-l500 (9).jpg s-l500.jpg
 

johnnypocket

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Jun 29, 2017
131
176
43
Long Island, N.Y.
Country
Region
Early Ingersolls, particularly back wind and set, souvenir, advertising and private label. Have been known to add other early dollar watches in the same categories.
This is a Lady after my heart...lol....as we have shown on the 500 or so posts and many many views in the Dollar watch thread on this forum, there are alot of us "dollar" lovers out there. I, like Pat, love 19th century Ingersoll backwinds. Well truth is all thing Ingersoll.I also have a thing for all things Trenton (pre and post Ingersoll takeover)but that may be a N/E thing. I also like to complete a full set of a Companies model production, I did that with all style Westclox Pocket Bens(including a "project" style 3). The style 3 was a very ellusive one. That to me makes collecting fun, it causes us to research, search and complete a mission. It also is a learning experience. Accumulating is O.K., but expanding your collection with a purpose is alot more fun (to me at least).
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: musicguy and PatH

okiejohn

Registered User
Nov 22, 2013
83
194
33
Country
Region
I've only been collecting a few years now. For some subconscious reason, I fell in love/lust with Rockfords. I really like the damaskeening and the relative rarity of many of the grades. While I collect just about any American PW brand when I see something I like, I grab up Rockfords at nearly every opportunity, if it's a grade I don't have (too many of :emoji_wink:).

Here's a Grade 820 that I brought back to life, bought just the movement from an Ebay seller from Georgia - the country, not the state - waited for it to be delivered for a couple of weeks (seemed longer) all the while thinking I probably got screwed :exhausted:. It arrived and I was very pleasantly surprised, a WORKING movement (as it was advertised) :nutjob:. I also bought a dial on Ebay, got hands (thanks to Marty the PW hand guy!) and dropped it into a salesman's display case so I could ogle it:excited: any time! Now I have a Rockford of which only 331 were made!
My only fear is that, with the unreliable nature of Rockford production records, this isn't really a Grade 820 but some other common 18s, 17j grade. :emoji_fearful:

78197570993ef19c4193935b8f269b3e.jpg fdaea5375ae4f3839d1ae74a62969a3b.jpg e90a5004b6ffd49f727aad4d9e184617.jpg
 

topspin

Registered User
Dec 14, 2014
1,442
206
63
Country
Region
Nowdays I mostly collect Walthams. Can't remember whether I originally went down that path primarily because they were the easiest brand to collect over here, or because I'd come across a few (possibly Vanguards) with beautiful dials.
The endless variety of models, grades, sizes, jewel-counts, cases, dials etc makes it very easy/tempting to build up a big collection, and keep building it.

Over here we rarely see any of the higher grades appearing from virgin sources, but there is still plenty of interest to choose from. I take particular delight in knowing that I can find many models, sizes, grades, private labels etc which might not seem very special in themselves, but would be something of a rara avis to a collector over there.
 

Robert Sweet

Registered User
Apr 29, 2004
3,171
573
113
Country
Over the next 10-15 years I did find every grade and number in that grade in 18 & 16 sizes, so I started on 10& 12's and went into the Military and Chronometers.
Jim, I bet you had a hard time locating the following...……..

Grade----Quantity
962-------430
963-------380
964-------300
965-------399
966-------307
967-------300
968-------923
969-------812

Robert
 

Jim Haney

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Sep 21, 2002
6,735
1,466
113
71
Decatur, TN.
Country
Region
Robert,

Yes, some very very hard to find.

Things run in bunches and right now we are in a glut of watches because so many of the older guys have recently passed.

I looked for 5 years for a 967, which was reported to have a quantity of 300, however it was actually 272 because of later research by Dr. Howard Lasser.

When I finally found one I ran across another a few weeks later and then another a month later.

Hamilton's 16s 960 - 969 Series Watches
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robert Sweet

Robert Sweet

Registered User
Apr 29, 2004
3,171
573
113
Country
Robert,

Yes, some very very hard to find.

Things run in bunches and right now we are in a glut of watches because so many of the older guys have recently passed.

I looked for 5 years for a 967, which was reported to have a quantity of 300, however it was actually 272 because of later research by Dr. Howard Lasser.

When I finally found one I ran across another a few weeks later and then another a month later.

Hamilton's 16s 960 - 969 Series Watches
Thanks Jim,

Robert
 

Clint Geller

Registered User
Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Jul 12, 2002
1,982
1,241
113
66
Pittsburgh, PA
clintgeller.com
Country
Region
Compared with those of most of the other old-timers here, my own watch collection is numerically tiny. When I started collecting in the mid-1980s I had a dual focus on Walthams and early Howards. Walthams because of their centrality in the story of American watchmaking and their various scarce innovations. Howards because of their mystique born of their relative scarcity, their association with the luxury market, the lack (at the time) of much reliable collector information about them, their quirky idiosynchratic nature, individual character, special casing requirements, Moorhouse dials, and their common roots with Waltham in the Boston Watch Co. At some point I decided that the dearth of information available on early Howards made that historic company much more of an unplowed field than Waltham was, where I could make more of a scholarly contribution, which is my goal in all of my collecting. So when a major Howard collection was breaking up, and I had somewhat of an inside track, I sold my Walthams to concentrate on Howards. After I had published numerous research articles and an NAWCC book, my first, on Howards, I ended up selling my Howard collection as well, and I nearly withdrew from collecting altogether for a while. I wish I had several of those watches back now, though many went to good friends, which softens the remorse.

Then about five years ago I scratched an old dormant itch and started collecting watches with Civil War provenances, which wed my general interest in American history to my interest in watchmaking. That added a whole new, very rewarding dimension to my collecting hobby. I now have eleven Civil War provenance watches. While the majority of watches carried by Civil War soldiers of both armies were undoubtedly foreign, American made watches were heavily favored for presentation purposes, and most inscriptions on Union army watches are presentations. (Inscriptions on Confederate army watches, which I don't really collect, are generally not presentations, and are considerably scarcer altogether.) Thus the majority of my current small watch collection is American, and given the time period, that means Waltham. I have only one Howard with a Civil War provenance, whereas one other is a Swiss movement in an American case and a third is an English movement in an American case. Of the Waltham provenance watches, four are Model 1857s, one is a Model 1859, two are 16KWs and one is a 20KW. All the enlisted man presentations are silver, all the commissioned officer presentations are gold, and the two inscribed watches that just have the owner's name in them are both silver.

Even more recently, I have started collecting American Watch Company Grade Walthams again, irrespective of provenance. Counting the gold AWCo Grade Model 1859 (18KW) I closed a deal on yesterday, I now have examples of four different models. I also have picked up a couple of interesting pre-1860 English pocket chronometers in the past year.
 
Last edited:
Our 2021 National Meeting in Hampton Roads Virginia
Topic related ad experiment
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
160,838
Messages
1,395,477
Members
82,860
Latest member
srhuston
Encyclopedia Pages
1,099
Total wiki contributions
2,778
Last edit
Beat Setting 101 by Tom McIntyre