Bouncing/Clacking Sound in Gong Sequence.

clarke

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Oct 25, 2009
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In the strike sequences on a number of my clocks, in this case a HAC Vienna, along with each gong, there’s a concurrent bouncing sound like chattering teeth in the cold. It must be common as I’ve also had it with Ansonias and Junghans.

The hammer is visibly bouncing (I’ve never learned how much is normal). But tracing it back, everything on the hammer arbor is bouncing, including the hammer lifting pin/flange/spoke? that rides up on the next rising lifting leg of the hammer lifting star. That’s where I think the bouncing noise is coming from.
I’ve fiddled with the tensions of the springs wires on the strike arbor, but can’t seem to calm things down.
This is very annoying as the chatter ruins otherwise mellow and pure gongs.
This must be a common occurrence. Has anyone figured this out?
I’d appreciate any guidance.

Thanks.
c.
 

clarke

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Oct 25, 2009
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Thanks, but that's not it. I have clocks with the fly gears being very audible when they spin.
This sound is exactly in sync with the hammer hitting the gong.
c.
 

Old Rivers

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Oct 4, 2016
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In the strike sequences on a number of my clocks, in this case a HAC Vienna, along with each gong, there’s a concurrent bouncing sound like chattering teeth in the cold. It must be common as I’ve also had it with Ansonias and Junghans.

The hammer is visibly bouncing (I’ve never learned how much is normal). But tracing it back, everything on the hammer arbor is bouncing, including the hammer lifting pin/flange/spoke? that rides up on the next rising lifting leg of the hammer lifting star. That’s where I think the bouncing noise is coming from.
I’ve fiddled with the tensions of the springs wires on the strike arbor, but can’t seem to calm things down.
This is very annoying as the chatter ruins otherwise mellow and pure gongs.
This must be a common occurrence. Has anyone figured this out?
I’d appreciate any guidance.

Thanks.
c.
This might sound obvious, but I had an issue identical to yours on a T & S Gustav Becker with a rod gong.
Turns out the brass rod which connects the strike hammer to its pivot was barely contacting one of the movement holder posts, making a clacking sound as it struck. Re-contouring the rod fixed the problem.

Bill
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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On some clocks the mounting of the hammer on its arbor can become loose. This can allow the hammer head to "clack" against the backboard or the gong block. Willie X
 

Tim Orr

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Good evening, Clarke!

As the butler says in The Big Sleep, "I make many mistakes, Sir." However, if it's not the gong itself that is chattering, which usually is because the hammer rest position is too close to the gong, I would bet that the gong pin wheel is traveling too far after the gong lever drops off the lifting pin.

Or, perhaps the gong lever is bent, making it contact the next pin too early. In any case, if I am understanding your description correctly, there is no way the lever ought to be coming into contact with the next pin until the pin wheel moves into position and causes it to do so. It should not swing so wide after hitting the gong that it comes into contact with the next pin.

Or perhaps there is a stop pin for the gong lever itself, which may be missing or misadjusted.

It sounds to me as though you are describing a situation in which the lever falls off the correct pin, but upon hitting the gong, simultaneously comes into contact with the next pin. That shouldn't be happening. Is it? Eventually, something will be damaged, probably the pins on the wheel.

Pictures, as always, would be helpful.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

shutterbug

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Some clocks have a damper so the hammer doesn't bounce so much. But most of the time, you can settle bouncing like that down a bit by just changing how high the hammer lifts. It doesn't need to lift much more than 1/2 to 3/4 inch. The higher the lift, the more it's going to bounce after impact.
 

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