Boston Shipstrike with 132-071 has loose part

Sailing Todd

Registered User
Jan 16, 2022
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i have a Boston/Chelsea Shipstrike (ships bell) clock with the usual Hermle 132-071 movement. it has been working very well for years
and striking the subtracted bells on the half hour perfectly.

Recently it began missing the odd numbered bells on the half hour, a problem that i found to be position sensitive. This means that if the clock is mounted vertically, as on a wall (bulkhead!), it strikes in error, but if tilted about 30 degrees forward, it consistently strikes correctly!!
I carefully disassembled it to look for an obvious cause in the subtraction, and in the process found a tiny brass cone made of sheet metal about .002 thick. it was not loose, but sticking to a gear in some remote part of the movement. It could certainly be put on a shaft of .o70 to .14 in diameter, but i can see no location like this.

The attached picture shows the mystery cone, and I would greatly appreciate it if someone can tell me the name of this part and where it goes:???:? Certainly this cone can be a separate issue from the striking problem, but tilting the movement to fix the strike sounds like gravity at work, which could mean the cone prevents some movement or other.

I am sure this is a problem for the experts on this forum, whom I thank in advance for any attention they can give. ..and thanks as well for the opportunity to post here.
Todd

CLOCK CONE WITH CAPTIONS.png
 

Sailing Todd

Registered User
Jan 16, 2022
5
3
3
76
Country
i have a Boston/Chelsea Shipstrike (ships bell) clock with the usual Hermle 132-071 movement. it has been working very well for years
and striking the subtracted bells on the half hour perfectly.

Recently it began missing the odd numbered bells on the half hour, a problem that i found to be position sensitive. This means that if the clock is mounted vertically, as on a wall (bulkhead!), it strikes in error, but if tilted about 30 degrees forward, it consistently strikes correctly!!
I carefully disassembled it to look for an obvious cause in the subtraction, and in the process found a tiny brass cone made of sheet metal about .002 thick. it was not loose, but sticking to a gear in some remote part of the movement. It could certainly be put on a shaft of .o70 to .14 in diameter, but i can see no location like this.

The attached picture shows the mystery cone, and I would greatly appreciate it if someone can tell me the name of this part and where it goes:???:? Certainly this cone can be a separate issue from the striking problem, but tilting the movement to fix the strike sounds like gravity at work, which could mean the cone prevents some movement or other.

I am sure this is a problem for the experts on this forum, whom I thank in advance for any attention they can give. ..and thanks as well for the opportunity to post here.
Todd

View attachment 690983
UPDATE 1/29/2022---- Unfortunately this post has been unsuccessful because no one has offered any advice or support in response to it. Possibly this is due to my inexperience as a new poster.

IN THE MEANTIME, I have found the exact cause of my ships bell striking error on the half hour. Thanks to Stephen Conovers fine book, I learned how the Arresting Lever and Hammer Lever Extension work together to "subtract" one bell at the end of strikes, on the half hour only. The Arresting Lever takes a position below the Hammer lever extension at the start of a half hour strike, but rises during the striking process and MUST contact and inhibit the hammer lever extension to prevent the final strike. My clock would just miss contacting here when the clock was in a fully vertical position, but worked perfectly when tilted forward! This appeared to be due to normal side play in the Arresting lever and associated parts. A tiny bend in the Hammer Lever extension made the contact solid when the clock was vertical. It has been running perfectly for several days now, so I believe it to be fixed.
Thanks to the forum and NAWCC for making the educational power of this website available to non-experts, and for the recommendation of steven Conover's book. Together these resources enabled me to repair my clock , even though I didnt receive any posts.
Todd
 

Jaap

Registered User
Mar 6, 2013
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UPDATE 1/29/2022---- Unfortunately this post has been unsuccessful because no one has offered any advice or support in response to it. Possibly this is due to my inexperience as a new poster.

IN THE MEANTIME, I have found the exact cause of my ships bell striking error on the half hour. Thanks to Stephen Conovers fine book, I learned how the Arresting Lever and Hammer Lever Extension work together to "subtract" one bell at the end of strikes, on the half hour only. The Arresting Lever takes a position below the Hammer lever extension at the start of a half hour strike, but rises during the striking process and MUST contact and inhibit the hammer lever extension to prevent the final strike. My clock would just miss contacting here when the clock was in a fully vertical position, but worked perfectly when tilted forward! This appeared to be due to normal side play in the Arresting lever and associated parts. A tiny bend in the Hammer Lever extension made the contact solid when the clock was vertical. It has been running perfectly for several days now, so I believe it to be fixed.
Thanks to the forum and NAWCC for making the educational power of this website available to non-experts, and for the recommendation of steven Conover's book. Together these resources enabled me to repair my clock , even though I didnt receive any posts.
Todd
Welcome to this site, and great you solved your problem.

Jaap
 

Sailing Todd

Registered User
Jan 16, 2022
5
3
3
76
Country
UPDATE 1/29/2022---- Unfortunately this post has been unsuccessful because no one has offered any advice or support in response to it. Possibly this is due to my inexperience as a new poster.

IN THE MEANTIME, I have found the exact cause of my ships bell striking error on the half hour. Thanks to Stephen Conovers fine book, I learned how the Arresting Lever and Hammer Lever Extension work together to "subtract" one bell at the end of strikes, on the half hour only. The Arresting Lever takes a position below the Hammer lever extension at the start of a half hour strike, but rises during the striking process and MUST contact and inhibit the hammer lever extension to prevent the final strike. My clock would just miss contacting here when the clock was in a fully vertical position, but worked perfectly when tilted forward! This appeared to be due to normal side play in the Arresting lever and associated parts. A tiny bend in the Hammer Lever extension made the contact solid when the clock was vertical. It has been running perfectly for several days now, so I believe it to be fixed.
Thanks to the forum and NAWCC for making the educational power of this website available to non-experts, and for the recommendation of steven Conover's book. Together these resources enabled me to repair my clock , even though I didnt receive any posts.
Todd
Welcome to this site, and great you solved your problem.

Jaap

Thanks,Jaap. Any idea what the mystery part could be, or what class of parts it falls in? Clock runs fine without it.
Todd
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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UPDATE 1/29/2022---- Unfortunately this post has been unsuccessful because no one has offered any advice or support in response to it. Possibly this is due to my inexperience as a new poster.
Many times inquiries are posted here by people who do not have answers and have not done their homework. I think you will agree that one cannot repair a clock if one has not the slightest indication of how it works. A person does not become a clock repair person by repairing one clock. Your solution to the problem may not be a long lasting fix because you may have treated only the symptoms. If an adjustment needed to be made, that fault may have been caused by something else, like wear in the movement. If that is true, the wear will take its toll in other parts of the clock movement. Maybe sooner, maybe later.

You still have an extra part that you said was:
sticking to a gear in some remote part of the movement
The movement should not be sticky enough to retain any cone. Could someone, in the clock movement's history, sprayed it with a product like WD-40? When the solvents from those products evaporate, a sticky film is left throughout the movement, causing failure.

The movement used in your ship's strike clock is of lesser quality than the standard "Chelsea" movement and those are prone to problems.

This board is populated by many levels of clock repair people. Even the best cannot offer simple, effective answers without all of the facts. I do not believe this is the place to post a rant about poor service (slow response time) given by a bunch of volunteers.

That is how I feel,

Dick
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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Welcome to the forum. Yes, it can take some time before the right person sees a particular post. But in your case, the lack of response was a good thing. You learned how your movement works, giving yourself the means to diagnose the problem. I have always been of the opinion that it is very difficult to apply advice given on the forum without some basic knowledge on how clock movements work. I am glad you fixed your problem for now, but as Dick has pointed out, wear is a major factor that eventually must be addressed. The more you learn about your clock, the longer you will be able to enjoy it.
 

Sailing Todd

Registered User
Jan 16, 2022
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76
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Many times inquiries are posted here by people who do not have answers and have not done their homework. I think you will agree that one cannot repair a clock if one has not the slightest indication of how it works. A person does not become a clock repair person by repairing one clock. Your solution to the problem may not be a long lasting fix because you may have treated only the symptoms. If an adjustment needed to be made, that fault may have been caused by something else, like wear in the movement. If that is true, the wear will take its toll in other parts of the clock movement. Maybe sooner, maybe later.

You still have an extra part that you said was:

The movement should not be sticky enough to retain any cone. Could someone, in the clock movement's history, sprayed it with a product like WD-40? When the solvents from those products evaporate, a sticky film is left throughout the movement, causing failure.

The movement used in your ship's strike clock is of lesser quality than the standard "Chelsea" movement and those are prone to problems.

This board is populated by many levels of clock repair people. Even the best cannot offer simple, effective answers without all of the facts. I do not believe this is the place to post a rant about poor service (slow response time) given by a bunch of volunteers.

That is how I feel,

Dick
Dick- I am sorry you felt I was ranting, and apologize for leaving that impression. I will only say that I read dozens of posts to become familiar with the style of discourse and tried very hard to write somehing what was respectful and appreciative to those who make this forum work. I have already learned a lot from them.
In response to your question about stickiness, I can only say that I have never used anything (much less wd40) on this clock in the 10 years I have owned it. I am still uneasy about the clock because the loose part remains unidentified and certainly might be at the heart of some hidden problem.
TOdd
 

tracerjack

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Jun 6, 2016
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I see that you have Steven Conover's book "Striking Clock Repair Guide", which has a chapter on the Hermle 132-071 Ship's Bell movement. I checked all the diagrams and read the chapter. The only spacers mentioned are two for the hammer bridge, but there are no diagrams of how they look. If that part is not a spacer for the hammer bridge, I would suspect it might have been used in mounting the movement to the case. However, I have found all kinds of things in clocks that don't belong at all, so your brass piece may be one of those.
 
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Sailing Todd

Registered User
Jan 16, 2022
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Tracerjack- Thanks very much for the ideas. Just knowing that odd parts sometimes appear in clocks is a help! I will take the clock apart and study the hammer arbor, but I have already spent a lot of time looking , so might not find it. The part is clearly made as a split ring on purpose, so it might fit on a shaft without taking the clock apart, but who knows.
 
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