Book Recommendations For A Newbie

tomwoodworker

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Jun 18, 2021
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I'd like to acquire a flea market clock and try my hand at disassembling and cleaning it. But I really don't know the names of the parts that I would be dealing with and the like. Is there a book that comes to mind that would be helpful for someone just starting out as a clock hobbyist?

And, is there a clock type you could suggest I look for, i.e. a one arbor clock?

Many thanks, Tom.

Ps. If this question would be better asked elsewhere please let me know.
 

Dave Coatsworth

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I would purchase one of Steven Conover's books and a matching movement and work with that. (For example, his 'Striking Clock Repair Guide" and an American striking movement.) It was Steven Conover's books that finally made clock repair 'click' for me.
 
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Willie X

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There are several good book lists. Just do a search in the archives for 'recommended books for beginners'. There may be a book list in the stickey notes at the top of this page?

Any full size simple movement would be a good patient. In general, older (pre WW-II) movements are easier than newer ones, although they might need more work. Make sure it is complete.

I would avoid chiming clocks all together, at least until you get some experience. Crawl - walk - run ... :)

Willie X
 
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JTD

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I would avoid chiming clocks all together, at least until you get some experience. Crawl - walk - run
I agree, start with a simple timepiece, there is more than enough to learn there. Once you have worked on several and know your way about, then go on to a simple time and strike. And striking clocks come in all sorts of variations, so there is plenty to learn on them, too.

Chiming clocks are a long way further down the road.

At least so I believe.

JTD
 

Schatznut

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I'd recommend a 400-day clock because they are cheap, plentiful, and only have a single train. Plus they require you to get everything just right if they are to run for a full year on a single winding. If you go this route, buy a copy of the Horolovar Guide, to help you understand what's going on. If you can get one or two 400-day clocks working correctly, you will be well-poised to move to more complicated clocks. But beware - they can be addictive, like salted peanuts.
 

Willie X

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That book SC just mentioned should be near the top of the beginners books list. Even though it is specifically for 400-Day clocks, it has a lot of good general information and one of the best chapters ever on understanding and adjusting a 'deadbeat' escapement. Willie X
 

tomwoodworker

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Thanks to each of you. I bought the book from The Horolovar website as well as an eBook on 'Beginners Guide To Clock Repair'.
 

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