Boiling out rusted screws

Discussion in 'Wrist Watches' started by Ian Timshel, Feb 28, 2001.

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  1. Ian Timshel

    Ian Timshel Guest

    Hi all

    I have a little ladies Omega with some rust trouble. I have everything out and ready to replace and or clean except the dial screws. Somewhere I read about using acid to eat out the steel screws but can't find that information now. If you could, please shed some light on this for me. I would much prefer to insert the replacement screws cleanly rather than risk drilling and tapping.
    Thanks in advance.
    Cheers! Ian
     
  2. Ian Timshel

    Ian Timshel Guest

    Hi all

    I have a little ladies Omega with some rust trouble. I have everything out and ready to replace and or clean except the dial screws. Somewhere I read about using acid to eat out the steel screws but can't find that information now. If you could, please shed some light on this for me. I would much prefer to insert the replacement screws cleanly rather than risk drilling and tapping.
    Thanks in advance.
    Cheers! Ian
     
  3. Ian Timshel

    Ian Timshel Guest

    Steve.
    Thanks for the nod. This was exactly what I had been chasing. I'll report back on the results when I'm done.
    Cheers! Ian.
     
  4. bsaunders

    bsaunders Guest

    Thanks for the info. Better than we got in school. How did you maintain the heat for 24 hours? Some people use a Fri-baby mini crock pot for jewelry pickling solution. Cheap in garage sales and I should try my wifes for this. She never has taken it out of the box anyway. Bob
     
  5. kset51

    kset51 Guest

    I use a product called Vissin. Available at most parts houses. Works great. Cover plate less any steel, heat and after about 1/2 hour the screw is gone
    Ken
     
  6. Ian Timshel

    Ian Timshel Guest

    Steve and all.
    The alum boiling worked to a "T". I used distilled water and about five table spoons of alum in less than a quarter cup of water. I had a bit of alum in the kitchen and went with what I had.

    The 150 degrees F. seemed a little low as an estimate. At first I couldn't get enough of the alum to desolve. The next morning I went to the kitchen stove. I placed a small pyrex flask on a wire on top of the element. Without the wire under the flask I'm pretty sure it would crack with the heat.

    I took the temperature up to the point I could see a healthy stream of bubbles rising from the dial screw holes and went off to town to do my deliveries. When I came back several hours later It was all over.

    The liquid had become cloudy and the activity seemed much reduced. I washed the main plate well in hot water and blew it dry. The plate was covered in a fine crystaline coating. This had to be carefully pegged out of every little chink and corner.

    The screw holes had to be carefully pegged out to remove the remaining rust. It appeared that all the "steel" was gone completely. The holes were tricky to peg and tended to grab the peg wood willingly. Twice I got caught breaking the tip off of the peg wood in the hole and having to open it up again.

    On completion the plate was like new and the new dial screws were threaded in perfectly.

    Steve, thank-you for adding such a wonderful tool to my bag of tricks.

    Cheers! Ian.
     

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