Black Forest

eskmill

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Aug 24, 2000
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Judy asks some good questions that can't have truly clear-cut answers.

"Would any Hamburg or Mauthe clock be considered a Black Forest Clock? and what kind of wood was used in the Black Forest area? In other words what constitutes a clock to be called a Black Forest Clock?"

Although Hamburg is far North of the Black Forest, the Hamburg-American Clock Co. had its beginnings in the Black Forest. On the other hand, many authorities would opine that HAU, (Hamburg-American Uhrmacher) Mauthe, Junghans and Becker did not employ cottage-craft techniques but instead adopted mass production methods and thus their products do not have true "Black Forest" cottage-craft character.

However, many German clock designs evolved from patterns used by Black Forest craftsmen. I don't think you can draw a line on this issue.

Black Forest trees are conifers; hard woods are not native to the region. Black Forest cottage-craft clock frame makers brought beech wood from the area West of the Black Forest according to researchers. And because there was no rail transportation until 1872, any imported materials were hauled on wagon roads. Thus most early BF clocks are devoid of hard wood and veneers.

Les
 

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