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Best way to straighten an arbor?

shutterbug

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I've got a 400 day that had a spring malfunction that bent the one and two arbors. The barrel arbor is straight enough to work OK, but the number two needs a new pivot as well. Can't pivot until it's straight, and close enough isn't :) So how do you guys do it? I see a straightening device from Timesavers that's REAL pricey. Hope not to go there :)
 

harold bain

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SB, you probably have everything you need. Each bent arbor has to be dealt with based on it's characteristics, where the pinion is, and where the gear is, and where the bend is. A bench block with the right sized hole (same size as the arbor) helps. But a piece of hardwood can easily be drilled to fit the arbor (hole must be perfectly diagonal). How you go about the straightening depends on my second sentence.
You may be able to chuck it in your lathe, and turn it by hand, pushing towards center until it runs true. You might spin it in the bench block and do the same. I've never had one that couldn't be straightened, but some are definately more difficult than others.
 

bangster

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Huckabee's book shows a simple method. Arbor is rested on two grooved blocks (with space between for the wheel). Roll it until the high side is up, then tap it near the middle with a hammer & flat punch. Repeat until straight.

bangster
 

Willie X

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Bug,

What Bang said Huckabee said, except use a small thin hardwood block struck with the hammer. Apply this force through the end-grain of the block and directly onto the pinion. This is where the deforming force struck so you will be best to put the reforming force in the same place, just in the opposite direction.

Willie X
 

Clockworks999

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Blocks (or the jaws of a bench vice), hammer, and hardwood "punch" works for me, too.

I've got an old depthing tool that I use for spinning the arbor to check that it's running true.
 

bangster

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Bug,

What Bang said Huckabee said, except use a small thin hardwood block struck with the hammer. Apply this force through the end-grain of the block and directly onto the pinion. This is where the deforming force struck so you will be best to put the reforming force in the same place, just in the opposite direction.

Willie X
Right. I was writing from memory, without checking the book. What Wilie said.

bangster
 

Scottie-TX

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For me it depends also on the size on the arbor. If it's a thick one, low in the train, I do it in the drill press - small ones in the lathe. I'm not a big fan of striking here, but can see it's merits over a steady bend.
 

Dave D

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Huckabee's book shows a simple method. Arbor is rested on two grooved blocks (with space between for the wheel). Roll it until the high side is up, then tap it near the middle with a hammer & flat punch. Repeat until straight.

bangster

What's the name of this book? It sounds like something I would enjoy.
Dave
 

shutterbug

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Bug,

What Bang said Huckabee said, except use a small thin hardwood block struck with the hammer. Apply this force through the end-grain of the block and directly onto the pinion. This is where the deforming force struck so you will be best to put the reforming force in the same place, just in the opposite direction.

Willie X
Very interesting idea. I'd naturally want to avoid banging on the pinion, but that sure makes sense! Thanks to everyone who contributed! I'm going to try the wood blocks first and see what works best for me.
 

harold bain

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What's the name of this book? It sounds like something I would enjoy.
Dave
Dave, the book is called "The top 300 Trade Secrets of a Master Clockmaker" by J.M. Huckabee.
I don't see it in my latest Timesavers catalogue, so it may be out of print.
 

bangster

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