Best Way To Repair This Broken Glass

Dave D

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Apr 5, 2006
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My elderly neighbor asked me if this was repairable. It's only 3 pieces and they fit together well. My first thought is CA glue. Is there a better method? Finding an identical replacement will most likely be impossible.
Thanks!
Dave D

IMG_4832.jpg
 

JeffG

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Jul 8, 2020
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Loctite makes a glue that is specifically for repairing glass, but I have no personal experience with it yet.
 

T.Cu

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Sep 26, 2020
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If the glass is truly flat, laying it on a marble or granite surface "might" work with superglue. Clean edges with alcohol or acetone first. Do one piece at a time. Gently push or slide the pieces together. Use just a little glue so it doesn't squeeze out and wreck the paint. After it dries any squeeze-out can be sliced off the plain glass side with a razor blade.
I'd be interested to hear others' ways of attempting this. There is also clear two part epoxy you can buy..
 

rwhclock

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Apr 28, 2022
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Try pushing it together and take a high resolution picture. See if a sign shop can make a decal to put on a new piece of glass.
 

Arthur Cagle

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May 22, 2003
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Well, it's certainly very visible, but I've seen similar glasses treated as you would stained glass, using the copper foil method. The repair stands out, but as part of the history of the clock, to me it isn't objectionable. I haven't tried gluing glass as has been suggested, but I have a hard time believing that gluing glass edge to edge would give you enough surface area adhesion for a decent repair.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Nov 26, 2009
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My elderly neighbor asked me if this was repairable. It's only 3 pieces and they fit together well. My first thought is CA glue. Is there a better method? Finding an identical replacement will most likely be impossible.
Thanks!
Dave D

View attachment 709967
There are people who can repair/restore the original glass. Linda Abrams in Waltham, MA comes to mind. She does museum quality restorations with a specialty in broken glasses. See this thread for a Heman Clark Shelf clock where she restored a badly cracked original glass:

Heman Clark | NAWCC Forums

Repairs such as this are very expensive. I don't know what the clock was. But it's a late mass-produced tablet. Honestly, I doubt that the glass or the clock is worth that type of expense.

With patience, it may in fact actually may be possible to replace with a period glass. May not be of the same design, but an appropriate period replacement.

The super glue repairs may be worth a try? Again, not a rare or valuable glass, so worth giving a try?

Sometimes the pieces are glued to the back of another piece of glass.

Don't like the suggestion of using a leaded glass technique at all.

RM
 

demoman3955

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Apr 9, 2022
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I deal with cars a lot, and 2 things come to mind. when ive had a window crack, say with a rock or BB, it may not crumble and fall, and not wanting an opening until it can be fixed, i used to spray a layer of clear spray paint. I wouldnt think that would work in your case, but it also made me think about the laminate that they use in between layers of windshield glass. Its perfectly see through, and im not even sure if its available or how it could be applied. Just tossing out ideas.
 

shutterbug

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It doesn't appear to be opaque, so maybe you could use something behind the glass to make it structurally more secure. I don't think it will be an invisible repair, but still better than it is now ;)
 

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