Best Magnifier Headset???

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by darita, Oct 27, 2015.

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  1. darita

    darita Registered User

    Apr 17, 2013
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    I wear glasses and am starting to work on alarm movements. Some of the movements are very small and require me to use a loop to see things like pivots and pivots holes. Since it's not possible for me to hold a loop and do the work, I'd like to know if there are some good, high magnifying headsets out there that don't cost a fortune, but still have a high magnification rate.
    Optimum for me would be a headset that I could wear like glasses, but I won't be that picky. I did get a set off amazon that were like loops mounted on eyeglass frames, with LED lights and those turned out to be junk, as I had to hold the items about 1/2 to 1" from the lens. I've also considered an articulated arm/lite, which would also work well, however I don't know how much magnification I would get from those.
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    Mine is a cheap two lens headset from Timesavers. I sometimes have to adjust it's position, but can see fine through it. There's a separate high power lens that you can flip up for closer viewing.
     
  3. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Optivisor. They cost about
    $45 now. The #4 lens is a good place to start. They are comfortable, replacement parts are available, and they last a really long time.
    Willie X
     
  4. AJSBSA

    AJSBSA Registered User

    Nov 24, 2009
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    Optivisors are excellent I am short sighted and I wear varifocal glasses, the number 5 lens works best for me at the bench, I have a another Optivisor with a number 4 lens for working on the lathe/ mill
     
  5. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    I've ended up with three Optivisors: 4x, 7x, and 10x. I have the extra "outrigger" lens (TS #13844) on the 7 and the 10. They do the job for me. I seldom have to use a loupe. Get the 4 or 5 to start with; and get the outrigger.
     
  6. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    I have a cheap one that I added a counter weight too, on the back.
    I don't use it much and find a loupe or a round florescent magnifier
    it best.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  7. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    May 31, 2005
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    darita
    Unfortunately, it is not practical to discuss Optics without having experienced high quality Optics as a standard of comparison. The Optivisor being discussed is an excellent example. While many may seem satisfied, if they were to experience a similar product from a company like Zeiss for example, it is likely the higher cost and the Optivisors would almost instantly be forgotten.

    For Horology, the highest practical magnification will be about 3X - 4X with quality optics. If you require more than that, its the quality of the Optics not the magnification giving you issues.

    As far as price, there is no free lunch and why would anyone want to take a chance with the only two eyes you will probably ever have. An Optometrist can give you the horror stories where it is to late by the time you learn the lesson.

    For the lowest cost option I can suggest would be as follows.

    (1) Get single vision prescription work eye glasses set to a comfortable working distance.

    (2) If additional magnification is required, wire frame Loupes in the 3X range attached to eyeglass frames are quite practical and efficient.

    (3) Select work glass frames that will allow proper mounting of the selected Loupes.

    (4) Reconfigure wire frame Loupes from original to extended eye relief per the attached photo. This greatly increases working distance. My personal Loupes are Zeiss but the one`s shown are Bausch and Lomb that are of sufficient quality for Horology.

    Jerry Kieffer
     

    Attached Files:

  8. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    There you go again, Jerry. :Party:
     
  9. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    May 31, 2005
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    Hey Bangster
    I hear Ya

    Its those crazy Customers that insist that I remove all traces of soft solder and other butchery. What is one to do other than make sure you have what you need to find it all ??

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  10. emhitch

    emhitch Registered User
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    Mar 17, 2009
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    Darita, I have and use two Optivisors, one with a #5 lens (2 1/2 X) and the other with a #10 lens (3 1/2 X). Both Optivisors have been fitted with the swing away Optiloupe (2 1/2 X additional). On the Optivisor I use the most for general work (#5 lens), I have fitted a Zebralight H51F. I also use this system for my lathe work because I have found the lighting is quite good. Yes, this system is expensive (Zebralight alone was ~$65) but I have been extremely pleased with it. The Optivisor Visor Light or the Quasar Lighting System were not acceptable options for me. The only complaint I have with the Zebralight is relatively short battery life, but I have solved that issue with rechargeable batteries. I have found the #10 lens system is really best for platform escapement work.
     

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