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Best Bushings

Calvin H. Huynh

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One of these days someone will figure out what oil sinks are actually good for. They weren't used in every clock, nor were they ever used in AC-operated electric clocks, nor in industrial timers. Nor in alarm clocks, forsooth.

M Kinsler
What are they good for besides looking good?
 

kinsler33

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They're often mentioned in old clock advertisements, along with 'cut steel pinions.' The idea is that they're supposed to stabilize and return an extra drop of oil to supplement that which is retained between the pivot and the wall of its hole. I don't think they work. And the solid pinions don't make any difference, either.


M Kinsler
 
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Calvin H. Huynh

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My hypothesis is that it can help with keeping oil and dirt in one spot? Because then you can scrape out old oil to replace them. At least on Hermley Schermley.

I feel like the bushing itself should contain the oil, with or without the sink.
 

shutterbug

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With longer pivots, oil sinks are not needed. Shorter pivots will tend to cut tunnels into the plates, so the oil sink provided a way to prevent that. The end of the pivot is above the lower level the sink provides. It's hype as an oil assist is just that, in my opinion.
 
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Calvin H. Huynh

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Thanks for all the suggestions and discussions. Anyone know how much KWM German bushings costed last year? The American KWM bushings inflated 10 bucks.
 

R. Croswell

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One of these days someone will figure out what oil sinks are actually good for. They weren't used in every clock, nor were they ever used in AC-operated electric clocks, nor in industrial timers. Nor in alarm clocks, forsooth.

M Kinsler
There are a couple of uses that are obvious. They can help direct oil into the pivot hole, and where the plate is very thick they can reduce the contact area and length of the required pivot for optimum durability and minimum friction. There have been lots of suggestions but so far I have seen no good explanation why some movements have oil sinks on one plate and not the other.

The only thing KWM thing I have is "Chamfering" tool. Does that cut oil sinks?
That took is used mostly to deburr the opening in the bushing. The deburred area can serve as a small "oil sink" if you use just a light touch, otherwise you will as already mentioned quickly go too deep. Of course if we don't really know what an oil sink is or what it is supposed to do how can we say that a "V" shaped oil sink will or will not work?

If a clock has thin plates and no oil sinks and you install bushings that have oil sinks the pivot will be supported by a smaller contact area and bushing wear will be faster than the original pivot hole. You options are to leave the bushing a little proud or use a longer bushing and trim flush top eliminate the oil sink and duplicate the original condition,

RC
 

Calvin H. Huynh

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Ok so I woke up this morning and decided I need 400 bushings for my stock “collection”. So that’s what I did. They were only 100 bucks. Way so much!

I got III, V, IV, and VI KWM authentic German assortments. They seemed cheaper than buying them on TimeSavers.
 
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Willie X

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I've never used a V at all. You will need the II and IV occasionally. If you think you need the V, then just add the II. But, by then you would be better off to buy the set. Willie X
 

Calvin H. Huynh

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They are 25 an assortment which is much better deal than 56 dollar TimeSavers.

I’ve thought V was for 1.9 height most chime clock bushings? Not sure.
 

Willie X

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V is the reamer size for very large bushings. These are rarely found in common clocks. Willie X
 

Calvin H. Huynh

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Uhralt

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One of these days someone will figure out what oil sinks are actually good for. They weren't used in every clock, nor were they ever used in AC-operated electric clocks, nor in industrial timers. Nor in alarm clocks, forsooth.

M Kinsler
I think the idea was to have something like an oil reservoir present at the pivot. Also, they have a decorative function. In many American clocks you will find them on the backplate, which is visible but not on the front plate.....

Uhralt
 

shutterbug

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But if you put too much oil in there, it will run out when the movement is set upright, and capillary action will pull the rest of the oil with it.
 

Calvin H. Huynh

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After a couple of hours of sorting, after clumsily opening one of the containers upside down, I can let my bushing craze rest.

63CA22D2-1981-4A7E-9713-CF48EB4316A6.jpeg
 

JimmyOz

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Whether it is decretive or has a use I don't know. however, whatever the movement, it should be bushed like for like (original), I hate when I repair a French movement when someone has put in a normal bushing and left them sticking up. Also something not talked about is the amount of oil used, the oilers that they sell gives way to much, you only need a very small drop to break the friction, slightly larger for winding arbours. Something I may get hammered for, I hate the use of grease in spring barrels, however maybe that deserves a topic on its own.
 
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Calvin H. Huynh

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The “Horace Whitlock” kit is more than good enough than buying some expensive oiler set. 15 dollars and free shipping on Amazon.

For what it’s worth, I would probably not go out of my way to bush a clock originally (without oil sinks) by using bushings without oil sinks.
 

JimmyOz

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The “Horace Whitlock” kit is more than good enough than buying some expensive oiler set. 15 dollars and free shipping on Amazon.
I use a 20 year old oiler, it was an ink replacement container for printers, well back in the days you could replace the ink in the small hole provided. I just closed the end so it only lets one small drop out at a time, anything inside the movement that needs done I just use a thin wire.
 

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