Best Books On Clocks

Discussion in 'Horological Books' started by Webgemcanada, Nov 16, 2005.

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  1. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    As a novice collector and restorer/repairer, I have been in and out of my public library for the last two years and checked out all their clock books.
    Some were kinda useful and some were pretty useless. Which are the good CLOCK BOOKS ?

    Can we get a top ten list together of must have books, for both repair, ID/History and valuation.

    Books are expensive and the correct choice first time will avoid dissapointment for us ( me especially ) after the money has gone. Buyers remorse would have been the phrase I would have used on over half the books I borrowed.

    I'm sorry if this topic has been done before by you "Old Pro's". If it has, please point all us newbies to the pot of gold: Should be crock of gold. I know! But "crock of" takes us in a totally different direction.

    Thanks for all the answers you have already given me. The thumbnail is on the mend. No drilling needed.

    Barry
     
  2. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    As a novice collector and restorer/repairer, I have been in and out of my public library for the last two years and checked out all their clock books.
    Some were kinda useful and some were pretty useless. Which are the good CLOCK BOOKS ?

    Can we get a top ten list together of must have books, for both repair, ID/History and valuation.

    Books are expensive and the correct choice first time will avoid dissapointment for us ( me especially ) after the money has gone. Buyers remorse would have been the phrase I would have used on over half the books I borrowed.

    I'm sorry if this topic has been done before by you "Old Pro's". If it has, please point all us newbies to the pot of gold: Should be crock of gold. I know! But "crock of" takes us in a totally different direction.

    Thanks for all the answers you have already given me. The thumbnail is on the mend. No drilling needed.

    Barry
     
  3. lamarw

    lamarw Registered User

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    Hi Barry, Your requirement covers almost the entire spectrum of clock reference material (repair, ID/History, and price guides). I do not think you will achieve it with ten or less publications. I have at least ten of Tran Duy Ly's publications and that is just a beginning (I do not have them all nor are all of mine current). I would probably recommend those first for ID/History and price guides. There have been many recommendations on the Forum for repair publications. You may want to do a search, and choices will depend a lot on the skill level and degree of repair or restoration. Repair publications and restorations efforts can often be two different animals. Are you a member of the NAWCC? The NAWCC Bulletins make up a vast part of my reference material. It took some time, but I was able to acquire all the past issues. The NAWCC Library has a wealth of material to include videos for all the categories you mentioned. A lot of the early NAWCC Bulletins are available through the NAWCC in hard bound editions (extremely reasonably priced). Many of us are learning that price guides are just that guides and seem to have varying degrees of market accuracy.

    Just as an idea - I maintain a wish list of publications that family members can use for Christmas and Birthday gifts. Saves them a lot of anquish and gives me much pleasure.
     
  4. lamarw

    lamarw Registered User

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    Hi Barry, Your requirement covers almost the entire spectrum of clock reference material (repair, ID/History, and price guides). I do not think you will achieve it with ten or less publications. I have at least ten of Tran Duy Ly's publications and that is just a beginning (I do not have them all nor are all of mine current). I would probably recommend those first for ID/History and price guides. There have been many recommendations on the Forum for repair publications. You may want to do a search, and choices will depend a lot on the skill level and degree of repair or restoration. Repair publications and restorations efforts can often be two different animals. Are you a member of the NAWCC? The NAWCC Bulletins make up a vast part of my reference material. It took some time, but I was able to acquire all the past issues. The NAWCC Library has a wealth of material to include videos for all the categories you mentioned. A lot of the early NAWCC Bulletins are available through the NAWCC in hard bound editions (extremely reasonably priced). Many of us are learning that price guides are just that guides and seem to have varying degrees of market accuracy.

    Just as an idea - I maintain a wish list of publications that family members can use for Christmas and Birthday gifts. Saves them a lot of anquish and gives me much pleasure.
     
  5. RL

    RL Registered User
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    Barry,
    I think you're question might be better served in the "Horological Books" forum.
     
  6. RL

    RL Registered User
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    Barry,
    I think you're question might be better served in the "Horological Books" forum.
     
  7. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    Thanks Phil.
    Sorry to be a bother.
    Barry
     
  8. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    Thanks Phil.
    Sorry to be a bother.
    Barry
     
  9. RL

    RL Registered User
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    Barry,
    I don't think Phil was implying that it was a bother. He is linking this to give your question better exposure, which in turn will get you more answers.
     
  10. RL

    RL Registered User
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    Barry,
    I don't think Phil was implying that it was a bother. He is linking this to give your question better exposure, which in turn will get you more answers.
     
  11. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    For the novice repairer, two modestly priced volumes I've found indespensible are: 1. "The Modern Clock" by Goodrich; (old but hits on every old kind of clock) and "The Best of Jesse Coleman, Clockmaker" compiled by Orville Hagens.

    Not to be overlooked are the booklets by Conover if you're into chime clocks and finally but not last, "This Old Clock," a syllabus by David Goodman is highly recommended even for those who know-it-all!
     
  12. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    For the novice repairer, two modestly priced volumes I've found indespensible are: 1. "The Modern Clock" by Goodrich; (old but hits on every old kind of clock) and "The Best of Jesse Coleman, Clockmaker" compiled by Orville Hagens.

    Not to be overlooked are the booklets by Conover if you're into chime clocks and finally but not last, "This Old Clock," a syllabus by David Goodman is highly recommended even for those who know-it-all!
     
  13. Ansomnia

    Ansomnia Registered User

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    Hello Barry, by coincidence I just posted the particulars to a book on carriage clocks that has to be one of the best clock books on the market. If you do not see the "Japy Frères et Cie" thread here again is the link I posted:

    Carriage Clock book eBay listing

    I also bought 2 other carriage clock books, one from Amazon and here is the eBay link that shows the book. My Amazon copy arrived today and it is beautiful.

    CARRIAGE and Other Travelling CLOCKS by Derek Roberts

    The Roberts book has better pictures but the Allix book has much more written information.

    The other book I bought is on repairing carriage clocks. I don't actually intend to try repairing the clock I have but maybe if I find a cheap old clock in dire need I may experiment and have some safe fun.

    THE CARRIAGE CLOCK A Repair and Restoration Manual by Laurie Penman

    Finally, while I have attached URLs to advertisements of books it is simply because they show pictures of the books. It's not because those links are necessarily the best sources for the books at this moment. Prices and conditions of books for sale vary all the time. I suggest you research a bit before picking a vendor to order from.


    Michael
     
  14. Ansomnia

    Ansomnia Registered User

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    Hello Barry, by coincidence I just posted the particulars to a book on carriage clocks that has to be one of the best clock books on the market. If you do not see the "Japy Frères et Cie" thread here again is the link I posted:

    Carriage Clock book eBay listing

    I also bought 2 other carriage clock books, one from Amazon and here is the eBay link that shows the book. My Amazon copy arrived today and it is beautiful.

    CARRIAGE and Other Travelling CLOCKS by Derek Roberts

    The Roberts book has better pictures but the Allix book has much more written information.

    The other book I bought is on repairing carriage clocks. I don't actually intend to try repairing the clock I have but maybe if I find a cheap old clock in dire need I may experiment and have some safe fun.

    THE CARRIAGE CLOCK A Repair and Restoration Manual by Laurie Penman

    Finally, while I have attached URLs to advertisements of books it is simply because they show pictures of the books. It's not because those links are necessarily the best sources for the books at this moment. Prices and conditions of books for sale vary all the time. I suggest you research a bit before picking a vendor to order from.


    Michael
     
  15. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Barry, if you attend the Toronto club chapter's meetings, there is a good selection of books for sale there, new and used. You can browse, and decide which ones appeal to you. It isn't hard to end up with a library worth a few thousand dollars over the years of collecting ;)
    Harold
     
  16. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Barry, if you attend the Toronto club chapter's meetings, there is a good selection of books for sale there, new and used. You can browse, and decide which ones appeal to you. It isn't hard to end up with a library worth a few thousand dollars over the years of collecting ;)
    Harold
     
  17. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Barry
    The flip answer to your question would be 'all of them'!
    To answer it properly, it does beg further questions from you:
    <UL TYPE=SQUARE>
    <LI>What sort of clocks do you want to collect (I am not just assuming American ones!)
    <LI>What do you want to do with them - restore them, cases or movements or both, or just look at them?
    <LI>What are your present skills and do you want to add more?
    <LI>What do you want from books - history, data, restoration advice, pictures?
    [/list]
    Without knowing these, I suspect that your answers will only be lists of books that the repliers will have, but Harold's idea is a good one to go and see what you like, and Dave's De Carle is something that should be on everyone's shelf, as it is very general and complete.
     
  18. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Barry
    The flip answer to your question would be 'all of them'!
    To answer it properly, it does beg further questions from you:
    <UL TYPE=SQUARE>
    <LI>What sort of clocks do you want to collect (I am not just assuming American ones!)
    <LI>What do you want to do with them - restore them, cases or movements or both, or just look at them?
    <LI>What are your present skills and do you want to add more?
    <LI>What do you want from books - history, data, restoration advice, pictures?
    [/list]
    Without knowing these, I suspect that your answers will only be lists of books that the repliers will have, but Harold's idea is a good one to go and see what you like, and Dave's De Carle is something that should be on everyone's shelf, as it is very general and complete.
     
  19. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    The first clock book I ever bought was Harold Kelly's "Clock Repairing as a Hobby". It's a small book, far from containing everything you'll want to know, but has good diagrams and descriptions of the various kinds of strike mechanisms. Helped me through my first tear-down and reassembly of a kitchen clock.

    The one I always turn to first is David Goodman's "This Old Clock", which was specifically written for newbies. In fact, it's what he has used in clock repair classes. For cuckoo clocks, the best one I know of is Philip Balcomb's "The Clock Repair First Reader".

    Among a half-dozen or so others I've acquired, DeCarle's "Practical Clock Repair" and Goodrich's "The Modern Clock" contain a wealth of information...but don't always tell me what I want to know (thank the clock gods for these message boards).

    As a newbie, the one you should get first is the Goodman book. Trust me.

    bangster
    advancing newbie
     
  20. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    The first clock book I ever bought was Harold Kelly's "Clock Repairing as a Hobby". It's a small book, far from containing everything you'll want to know, but has good diagrams and descriptions of the various kinds of strike mechanisms. Helped me through my first tear-down and reassembly of a kitchen clock.

    The one I always turn to first is David Goodman's "This Old Clock", which was specifically written for newbies. In fact, it's what he has used in clock repair classes. For cuckoo clocks, the best one I know of is Philip Balcomb's "The Clock Repair First Reader".

    Among a half-dozen or so others I've acquired, DeCarle's "Practical Clock Repair" and Goodrich's "The Modern Clock" contain a wealth of information...but don't always tell me what I want to know (thank the clock gods for these message boards).

    As a newbie, the one you should get first is the Goodman book. Trust me.

    bangster
    advancing newbie
     
  21. bchaps

    bchaps Registered User

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    In addition to many of the classics already mentioned, I found Huckabee's "Top 300 trade secrets" a real help when first entering this field.

    Bill
     
  22. bchaps

    bchaps Registered User

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    In addition to many of the classics already mentioned, I found Huckabee's "Top 300 trade secrets" a real help when first entering this field.

    Bill
     
  23. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    Thank you all for your advice.
    Now I can make a list.
    I can keep Santa busy for decades.

    Barry
     
  24. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    Thank you all for your advice.
    Now I can make a list.
    I can keep Santa busy for decades.

    Barry
     
  25. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    #25 Webgemcanada, Nov 29, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Mike. What searching questions.
    I want to collect all types of shelf and mantle to start with until I run out of surface area, then an occasional wall clock (regulator) until my wife complains about the number in each room. A couple of longcase would round out my dream collection. Your question made me realise that I have started with cheap clocks and really want to go to better quality ones. Trade and Upgrade eh?
    I want to be able to do all the work to restore them. Fixing movements is my main interest.
    My present skill level is "knowledge hungry enthusiastic novice". I have fixed a few but don't have the confidence to replace a mainspring on an American clock yet.
    What I want from books is history of the clock and detailed restoration advice.

    Clock collecting seems to be a bit like car collecting. You start with Chev/Ford until you discover Mercedes/BMW, then later you find something called a Ferrari and even that is not the end of your fascination and lust.

    Thanks for making me think.

    Barry
     
  26. Webgemcanada

    Webgemcanada Guest

    #26 Webgemcanada, Nov 29, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Mike. What searching questions.
    I want to collect all types of shelf and mantle to start with until I run out of surface area, then an occasional wall clock (regulator) until my wife complains about the number in each room. A couple of longcase would round out my dream collection. Your question made me realise that I have started with cheap clocks and really want to go to better quality ones. Trade and Upgrade eh?
    I want to be able to do all the work to restore them. Fixing movements is my main interest.
    My present skill level is "knowledge hungry enthusiastic novice". I have fixed a few but don't have the confidence to replace a mainspring on an American clock yet.
    What I want from books is history of the clock and detailed restoration advice.

    Clock collecting seems to be a bit like car collecting. You start with Chev/Ford until you discover Mercedes/BMW, then later you find something called a Ferrari and even that is not the end of your fascination and lust.

    Thanks for making me think.

    Barry
     
  27. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    #27 Mike Phelan, Nov 29, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017

    Looks as if you are going the right way about it, Barry.
    Cheap clocks like OGs also have their place in history - values are driven by fads sometimes.
    I also diddle with old radios - the current fad is 1930s round bakelite Ekcos that are quite cheap and basic, but fetch £££s!

    Your mention of shelf and regulator seems to be that you are aiming mainly for American clocks, so you will be well catered for by data books.

    The best thing for me if I bought a Ferrari would be to sell it after the novelty wore off, and use the money to buy a car that would fit a longcase and/or my wife's shopping, and I could fix when it went wrong or needed servicing.
    As for the Teutonic ones - bin there dun that - no good on the roads we have round here!
     
  28. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    #28 Mike Phelan, Nov 29, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Looks as if you are going the right way about it, Barry.
    Cheap clocks like OGs also have their place in history - values are driven by fads sometimes.
    I also diddle with old radios - the current fad is 1930s round bakelite Ekcos that are quite cheap and basic, but fetch £££s!

    Your mention of shelf and regulator seems to be that you are aiming mainly for American clocks, so you will be well catered for by data books.

    The best thing for me if I bought a Ferrari would be to sell it after the novelty wore off, and use the money to buy a car that would fit a longcase and/or my wife's shopping, and I could fix when it went wrong or needed servicing.
    As for the Teutonic ones - bin there dun that - no good on the roads we have round here!
     

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