Best and currently available Telechron B13 type rotor oil

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by emhitch, Feb 3, 2015.

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  1. emhitch

    emhitch Registered User
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    Mar 17, 2009
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    I have conducted research recently on the best and currently available lubricant for a Telechron B13 (type B3, 1 RPM, aluminum can/housing) with virtually no success. DSC_0030-low-res.jpg This rotor is in a Revere Telechron chiming clock. Can anyone provide recommendations on the most appropriate oil to lubricate the internal aspects of this B13 rotor and where I could purchase this oil?
     
  2. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    These newer rotors were never oil filled at the factory, but ran dry. They also were not as long lived as the older ones. You will note older ones stamped "TOP", to keep the oil where it belonged. Yours is date coded to September 86
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    I can certainly understand emhitch's lack of success in selecting an optimal lubricant for the GE/Telechron rotor.

    Given the various service usage variables, the only reasonable assumption would be moderately high temperature given the electric field coil heat losses.

    The speed of the rotor (3500 RPM) suggests a modern automobile engine oil.

    Some thought has to be given to the manufacturer's practice of using only assembly lubricant for the later aluminum capsules. 'Sounds horrible but who can conduct a twenty-year test on a product that's been out of production for about twenty years already?
     
  4. davefr

    davefr Registered User
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    #4 davefr, Feb 3, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
    Re-lubrication is pointless unless you totally disassemble the rotor down to it's individual piece parts and clean out all the old original dried up grease. You'll also find that several bushing pairs will need to be replaced along with some worn gear wheel replacements.

    Here's what needs to be completely cleaned:

    http://www.telechronclock.com/wpimages/wp84a1e349_05_06.jpg

    Once that's done I'd suggest a good synthetic oil with a viscosity rated at around 50 cSt @ 40degrees C. The choice of oil is not too critical - just don't use grease. Using grease in the B-13 was one of the stupidest things Telechron (actually GE) ever did because it defeats the whole purpose of the Henry Warren's wonderful capillary lubrication system. (They probably did it because they went with a cheap crimped aluminum case vs. sealed case.)

    Once the B-13 rotor has been converted from grease to oil and all the worn parts replaced then seal up the case with epoxy and it should have a long life.
     
  5. emhitch

    emhitch Registered User
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    Thanks to everyone for your guidance and recommendations. I appreciate it! Yes, my intent is to completely disassemble this rotor down to the component parts, address all wear issues, re-lubricate the rotor, and seal the case with epoxy (I was thinking about J-B Weld for this purpose; J-B is a cold weld formula steel reinforced epoxy), as suggested. DaveFR suggested "a good synthetic oil with a viscosity rated at around 50 cSt @ 40degrees C". Would Etsyntha 859 be appropriate for this application? It is a synthetic oil and the data sheet claims it has a viscosity of 60 cSt at 40 degrees C.
     
  6. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    The crimp can be cut on a lathe. I also recommend making
    sure there is no bur on the shaft for the setscrew
    before pulling it apart.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  7. davefr

    davefr Registered User
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    That oil should be just fine but I wouldn't spend the money on these expensive/exotic clock oils. (rotors don't share very many lubrication similarities with clocks). Any modern lubricant will be far superior to the primitive lubricants that Telechron had available at the time. I like Mobil 1 0W-20 or Dexron 6 synthetic. Use only enough oil so there's a small puddle at the bottom of the case like this patent drawing illustrates.

    wpe782c16b_06.png

    JB weld will work well to seal the case. It tends to be pretty thick out of the tube so I'd heat it up a tad so it flows out better.

    Good luck.
     

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