Bench Practices for Watch Repairers

Discussion in 'Horological Books' started by Mike Kearney, Sep 1, 2002.

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  1. Mike Kearney

    Mike Kearney Guest

    Bench Practices for Watch Repairers, Henry B. Fried, Copyright 1954, Roberts Publishing Co. 268 pages, hardbound, approx. 9"x6".

    This book is the follow-on to Fried's "The Watch Repairer's Manual", which was published in 1949. It covers topics he didn't include in the first book. In general, the material is more advanced, like hairspringing, so it shouldn't be considered a beginner book. But like "The Watch Repairer's Manual", it's a must have.

    The table of contents tries to organize a lot of misc material, and it's not the book's best feature. It describes it as three books, but physically it's just one volume. But once you find what you're looking for, Fried's explanations come through loud and clear.

    Book 1: Complete Hairspring Practices
    1. Selecting a hairspring
    2. Colleting a hairspring
    3. Truing a hairspring
    4. Vibrating a hairspring
    5. Studding a hairspring
    6. Centering a flat hairspring
    7. Forming a Breguet hairspring

    Book 2
    1. Replacing regulator pins
    2. Various types of watch screws
    Watch screws and how to make them
    3. Uses of staking stumps

    Book 3: Jeweling
    1. Jeweling
    2. Uprighting
    3. Friction Jeweling
    4. Replacing a barrel hook (how'd that get there?)
    5. Repivoting
    6. Fitting the pivot
    7. Dial Repairs
    8. The repair and adjustment of hollow center pinions and cannon pinions.

    Copies of this book aren't quite as common as his watch repairer's manual, but it's worth hunting down.

    Regards,
    Mike

    [This message has been edited by Mike Kearney (edited 09-01-2002).]
     
  2. Mike Kearney

    Mike Kearney Guest

    Bench Practices for Watch Repairers, Henry B. Fried, Copyright 1954, Roberts Publishing Co. 268 pages, hardbound, approx. 9"x6".

    This book is the follow-on to Fried's "The Watch Repairer's Manual", which was published in 1949. It covers topics he didn't include in the first book. In general, the material is more advanced, like hairspringing, so it shouldn't be considered a beginner book. But like "The Watch Repairer's Manual", it's a must have.

    The table of contents tries to organize a lot of misc material, and it's not the book's best feature. It describes it as three books, but physically it's just one volume. But once you find what you're looking for, Fried's explanations come through loud and clear.

    Book 1: Complete Hairspring Practices
    1. Selecting a hairspring
    2. Colleting a hairspring
    3. Truing a hairspring
    4. Vibrating a hairspring
    5. Studding a hairspring
    6. Centering a flat hairspring
    7. Forming a Breguet hairspring

    Book 2
    1. Replacing regulator pins
    2. Various types of watch screws
    Watch screws and how to make them
    3. Uses of staking stumps

    Book 3: Jeweling
    1. Jeweling
    2. Uprighting
    3. Friction Jeweling
    4. Replacing a barrel hook (how'd that get there?)
    5. Repivoting
    6. Fitting the pivot
    7. Dial Repairs
    8. The repair and adjustment of hollow center pinions and cannon pinions.

    Copies of this book aren't quite as common as his watch repairer's manual, but it's worth hunting down.

    Regards,
    Mike

    [This message has been edited by Mike Kearney (edited 09-01-2002).]
     

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