Batteries for watches.

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by Kevin W., Mar 27, 2016.

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  1. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    Not sure how easily this can be answered, but i will ask this question.Other than the size, if i find a watch with no battery in it. How would i know what to buy for a battery. I guess my biggest concern perhaps too much voltage and burn the circuits out. Most times there is a dead battery in them, so gives me something to work with.
     
  2. Skutt50

    Skutt50 Registered User

    Mar 14, 2008
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    You sometimes find a marking on the circuit board or even on the case back. The battery type should give you the voltage.

    If I have to guess, I will try a 1,5V. If higher voltage is required the 1,5 will not harm the movement, it will just not run!
     
  3. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    Thankyou Skutt.
     
  4. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

    Apr 20, 2013
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    Find out what movement is in the Watch. It's the same as with replacing a mainspring, the wrong Power source will harm the movement. I would Think that with the proper testing Equipment you could measure the Circuits.
     
  5. SandlerSmith

    SandlerSmith New Member

    Feb 1, 2020
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    Is there any equipment through which it will be easy to know whether there's need of watch battery replacement or not.
     
  6. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

    Apr 20, 2013
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    Multimeter. Check the voltage of the battery.
     
  7. MrRoundel

    MrRoundel Registered User
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    Dec 28, 2010
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    Sometimes it can take a bit of investigation online to get the right battery. First you have to know what brand and model/caliber of movement you're dealing with. Without that it's tough. You can go to one of the online parts houses and peruse their movement catalog. Or perhaps find a similar watch being sold somewhere online. With luck, the seller will have the back removed so you can sometimes see the battery number. That's the way I always do it.

    Or you can post an image of it on a repair forum and see if anyone recognizes it.

    While it seems that it would be nice to have the old battery left in there, it can be the worst thing for the watch if/when the battery salts/leaks and destroys the movement. In an ideal world, they who remove batteries for the sake of the watch would make a note inside of what battery was there. But alas...Good luck.
     
  8. pocketsrforwatches

    pocketsrforwatches Registered User
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    Feb 13, 2008
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    Retired from IBM, now a Watchmaker
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  9. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Apr 13, 2014
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    Leaky batteries and water are the two main killers of electric watches. I would stick with name brand batteries. I always use Energizers in my customers' watches. I have never seen a leaky one.
     
    viclip likes this.
  10. pocketsrforwatches

    pocketsrforwatches Registered User
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    Feb 13, 2008
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    I have had plenty of name brand batteries leak. I haven't had any issues with the Harbor Freight batteries. Not to say it can't happen. Just putting another option out there. YMMV
     
  11. ffresh

    ffresh Registered User
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    Dec 1, 2009
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    I often TEMPORARILY use alkaline cells to test a newly-acquired watch movement, sometimes using an incorrect physical size as availability dictates. But two reasons I refrain from using alkaline on a long-term basis in a watch are:
    1. much flatter discharge curve for a silver oxide cell vs an alkaline cell allows the movement a more stable operating life - alkaline cells will lose a significantly greater % capacity, early on, compared to a silver oxide, which should have a longer and more stable life cycle in a low drain application, i.e. watch
    2. the jury is still out but many "experts" believe the silver oxides are less prone to leakage than the alkaline cells

    If unsure about the correct cell to use/substitute (for the OP), this is a useful crosscheck chart, which has cell sizes - use a digital caliper to measure the battery well on the movement in question BatteriesAndButter.com: Batteries and Butter - Watch Battery Equivalence Chart
    FredF
     

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