Barrel sister teeth repair

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Will R, Sep 2, 2019.

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  1. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Hi all,

    Being new to clock repair (thank you again for everyone’s help recently with my striking query) I’m trying to build up my knowledge and get to know best practice etc. While disassembling my English Mantel clock over the weekend I discovered that the strike train barrel was missing some teeth and had been repaired at some point with a sister section. I understand it is a used method of repair but I was wondering, in relation to this barrel, what the consensus on the overall repair is. Is this how it would normally be done when sistering a section? Would anyone do it differently when sistering a section?

    Sorry if it seems an obvious question, I’m still trying to build up my bank of knowledge and asking about a piece I’m working with I think helps the knowledge to stick more.

    Thanks for your time,
    Will

    D1FE2ACF-90D1-4A6A-841F-F7C1465D2A7A.jpeg 7F20FF37-138D-468C-B6E7-8468D2A6BB78.jpeg 487356BA-E8FA-4442-A01B-3FA77A406AA7.jpeg
     
  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    The method you describe is sometimes done and if done carefully with an identical sister section will function quite satisfactorily. It is a strong but somewhat ugly repair. I would not call it "best practice" but I would not be inclined to change it.

    RC
     
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  3. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    Usually one would replace individual teeth if not too many are missing or insert a piece of brass to replace the broken section and cut or file new teeth. See here: Repairing spring barrel teeth

    However, in your case it would be quite difficult to do because the wheel is rather thin for a barrel. Even though the repair you have doesn't look nice, it seems to be solid and functional. This is something I might consider for my own clock (and hope to find a replacement part later) but not for a customer's clock.

    Uhralt
     
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  4. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Thanks for the feedback RC and Uhralt.

    The barrel itself works perfectly well, certainly not a problem with it so I’m very happy to leave it as it is. It’s good to get your thoughts on it’s pros and cons though and when it might be used as a form of repair so thank you for your comments.

    Will.
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I agree that it's not worth redoing at this point. But FYI, the better repair would be cutting out the bad section and hard (high temp silver) soldering the new section into place. It would take more time and equipment, but would look a lot better.
     
  6. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Hi Shutterbug,

    I agree, it functions perfectly currently so if I were to attempt a repair on something like this then it wouldn’t be until some time in the future, and dependant on the circumstance.

    Thank you for your further comment on the alternative method. I’ll research into it some more along with reading through the link from Uhralt earlier so that I’m well prepared for in future should a need for such a repair come up.

    Will.
     
  7. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    May 31, 2005
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    Will

    If your goal is to " build up knowledge and get to know best practice" as mentioned, this is not it. While it may be functioning at the moment, however, when it fails you will get the blame. I say this because the two rivets in the outer ring holding the patch in place, have no doubt greatly weakened the outer ring. In addition, the way the repair person beat the rivets, he likely damaged or even cracked the immediate location.

    My personal method of doing this is as follows.

    (1) The barrel /wheel is placed in a rotary table in a milling machine and the missing teeth plus additional cavity are machined away in an ark. I generally mount in a Lathe three jaw chuck mounted on the rotary table. This allows me to instantly remove and mount the chuck on the lathe for machining and return to the R/T for cutting teeth.

    (2) A matching work piece is high temp. silver soldered in place also as mentioned by Shutterbug.

    (3) The OD and thickness of the work piece is then machined to proper size in a lathe.

    (4) From this point it is returned to the R/T to machine the teeth to match with a cutter I already have or a machined matching single point cutter.

    The attached Photo shows replacement of 10 teeth between the arrows and machined single point cutter to match tooth profile.

    jerry Kieffer

    View attachment 547301

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  8. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    Mar 31, 2005
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    I agree with the leave it be school of thought on this one. It's functional, just not pretty. I have had experience with similar barrels to these. The ones I have worked on the wheels were removable from the barrel. That made them much easier to work on.
     
  9. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Hi Jerry,

    That’s is one masterful repair! Thank you for your insight on the matter and for providing a step by step guide on how you would approach it along with possible cons of the current repair. It’s all valuable insight for the (probably distant) future.

    I am in agreeance with you Leeinv66. At this point it’s not a repair I could manage, not least due to lack of tools but I think as it works just fine right now it’s best to leave it be and tackle it in future if the need requires. There is certainly great varied in clock work isn’t there!
     

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