Banjo Clock Rebuild

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Tony DePasquale, Nov 12, 2019.

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  1. Tony DePasquale

    Tony DePasquale Registered User
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    Oct 8, 2017
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    hello,

    I received the frame of a Banjo clock with the face plate only. It is in decent shape. I am going to work with my son on rebuilding the clock. I am new to this. Can someone let met know what type of movement do I need for it and how do I get the front glass for it. Can I get used parts somewhere?

    Thanks

    Tony
     
  2. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    There are always Banjot Clock movements on eBay… Size matters, pendulum length matters… Even though they’re usually roughly the same.

    As always, photos help inform discussions
     
  3. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    Aug 25, 2000
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    Send us a picture of what you have, it will be easier to help.
     
  4. Joe Hollen

    Joe Hollen Registered User
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    Apr 26, 2005
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    In lieu of pictures.... Before you do anything with the case, do this: find the "dead-center" of the clock head. This is where the cannon post will be ( the hands attach to the cannon post ). Mark the spot with a "dot". Now, go down to the bottom "box" (called the pendulum box), and find the "dead-center" of that box, and mark it with a dot. Now, measure between the dots. If the measurement is 20 1/2", then it needs a standard Banjo Clock movement. These are also known as " #5 " movements (E.Howard #5 sized movement). If it's about 3/4" longer (21 1/4") then you're looking at a #4 movement, or sometimes referred to as a "Girandole movement". Waltham timepiece movements also have this pendulum length. If it's shorter than 20 1/2", then you may be looking at one of the cheaper "late 1800's / early 1900's" spring driven banjos. I wouldn't bother restoring one of those unless you could find a movement that fits, and that would be a hit or miss...
     
  5. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    Mar 31, 2005
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    I am moving this over to clock repair as I think that will get you the best coverage.
     
  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I believe the most important issue now is to determine the manufacturer of your case. Some pictures of the case and dial would help a bunch.
     

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