Banjo Clock - How to tell it is wound enough?

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by f.webster, Jun 1, 2020.

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  1. f.webster

    f.webster Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2009
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    So I have this Killam & Co banjo clock that has painted panels. Not only that, it has a metal plate that houses/contains the weight shaft. No way to tell if the weight is wound too much or too little. It appears that someone has installed a screw to stop the weigh and pulley from winding into the movement. It doesn't work that well.

    I am looking for suggestions and comments to help me improve this situation. Thanks.

    Banjo Weight Stop.jpg
     
  2. Vernon

    Vernon Registered User
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    I count turns of the crank key and try to wind Sunday mornings. Not aways effective nor practical.
     
  3. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    practice makes perfect.

    i wind my clocks on tuesday mornings, a habit that allows for occasional long-weekend road trips.

    you do not want the pulley smacking into the movement when you wind your clock.

    you will find that you can get 8, 9, 10.... some amount of winds. the way to establish this is to wind it fully on your regular day. go slowly, and get ready for the pulley (or weight) to hit.... as soon as it does, stop winding.

    seven days later, repeat.... but count how many winds.... 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. go slowly, and get ready for when it can't go further... and stop.

    now you have a number.... let's say it's 8 full winds. that means that on the third week you can wind (fairly) quickly 1-6, and then slow down as you get to the final winds because you know it's going to not be able to go further at the end of wind 8 (or whatever your clock's number is).

    hope that helps.
     
  4. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    p.s.: the screw is there to stop the weight. can't tell from the photo whether the pulley would still hit the bottom of the movement

    p.p.s.: pls post photos of the entire clock.

    p.p.p.s.: you shouldn't have to remove anything to wind it every week.
     
  5. f.webster

    f.webster Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2009
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    Bruce - per your request.

    Killam Banjo.jpg
     
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  6. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Generally speaking the great wheel on most clocks makes two revolutions per day. So, for a 7-day run it should take 14 full turns of the crank or about 16 turns if it is fully run down. At least that is the theory, actual results may vary just a bit. But two turns of the crank per day will be quite accurate on any weight driven banjo I have had.
     
  7. Tim Orr

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    Good evening, Frank!

    As your local Mafia guy might say, "Nice clock. Be a shame if something happened to it."

    For what it is worth, the sainted David Goodman used to always say that way too many of us wind our clocks way too fast. Maybe you could hang a little jingle bell where the screw is, and listen for the sound? I agree with Jim and Bruce that most of the time, I can count on about 14 half-turns and slow way down as I get near the end. I really don't believe that bumping into the screw, or even the movement bottom – so long as it isn't a hard bump – is going to cause a lot of trouble.

    You sure don't want to slam the weight against the movement, or worse, break the cable and have the weight fall all the way to the bottom and through the bottom of the case! The former is bad, but the latter is a heart-breaker! Even worse on a tall-case! I've had both happen.

    Now, if it's a customer clock, and you'll have no control over how the winding is done, the bell might make good sense, or even a short extension spring between the bottom of the pulley hook and the top of the weight. Or a little block of wood or chunk of tire tread. :p

    Best regards!

    Tim Orr
     
  8. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    The majority of period patent timepieces (banjos) do not appear to have weight stops. Of these 3 only the large screw driven at an angle, apparently haphazardly, is thought to be original. The other two appear to be later modifications. I agree that with even moderate care it is quite apparent when the weight is wound "enough". In most of these timepieces winding the pully completely as high as it will go in the movement is not a problem. In a few it will intersect with the center wheel and cause stoppage. But, that is the exception that might well lead to a positive stop in the throat of the timepiece.

    20190416_161414.jpg H0011-L98830338.jpg SAM_0751.JPG
     
  9. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Another idea, but it would require opening the bottom door when you wind is: tie some string to the weight, and after winding it all the way up, cut the string off level with something like the top of the door. Then when you wind it, stop just before it reaches that spot.
     
  10. f.webster

    f.webster Registered User
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    Good thought shutterbug; however, this clock has the weight shaft completely enclosed.

    Tim Orr. The bell idea might help.

    After looking at this movement in the clock I noticed that the movement had shifted being only mounted in two locations. Jamming the weight into the screw I don't think is what stops this clock. When the movement shifts, it is out of beat. I have restored the holes that mount the movement and made sure that the mounting screws are tight. Now with the instruction to "Wind this clock GENTLY" I believe we may have solved the problem.

    Thank you all for being willing to add your two cents. You are truly mentors.
     
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