banjo clock glasses... ?

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by bruce linde, Dec 25, 2018.

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  1. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    i found a banjo clock online w throat and bottom glasses pretty much identical to one of mine i’ve asked about here... maker unknown

    the one i found is a hershede, w a hershede movement and other identifying marks... mine has no marks or identifiable characteristics.

    the person who has the hershede thinks that the maker of my clock sourced the glasses from hershede... or that both hershede and the maker of mine ordered them from the same supplier

    is this a particular theme? does this design have a name? anyone know what the bottom glasses are a representation of? are they copied from a willard, or are they just ‘in the style of...’?

    ps: chimney, movement mounting, slightly convex dial are all different on mine... but even the dial numbers are similar...

    73AEE977-478A-4B1D-A884-8108E318C530.jpeg
     
  2. Joeydeluxed

    Joeydeluxed Registered User
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    Mar 3, 2007
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    The photos are a bit small and I'm not 100% certain of what I'm looking at, but I believe your glass is a representation of Mount Vernon which was George Washington's house located not far outside of Washington DC. This scene was used on not only early banjo clock glasses but also on Waltham banjo glasses.
     
  3. Joe Hollen

    Joe Hollen Registered User
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    Apr 26, 2005
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    Hi Bruce...

    ( I “PM’ed” you back on your other question about Tifft clocks... )

    The Hershede clock looks like a product of the Chelsea Clock Company. The movement is a Chelsea movement, that I am 99.7% certain. The “unknown” banjo movement looks like a “Timesavers” (made in India) movement. The sidearms are slightly out of characteristic with only two diamonds on each sidearm... and, yes as Joeydeluxe says, the glasses are “Mount Vernon” glasses. The maker of your “unknown” banjo may have procured them from Chelsea, or Hershede, or maybe they were “hanging around” in someone’s parts bin ?! Who knows ! At least they’re “nice glasses” !

    Joe...
     
  4. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    thx for the responses... here are larger photos of the glasses...

    joe - can you tell me more about two diamonds vs. three? i never noticed that there were only two before...

    bottom.jpg throat.jpg
     
  5. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    and... is there a story behind the bottom glass painting? who's the guy walking down the path?
     
  6. Joe Hollen

    Joe Hollen Registered User
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    Apr 26, 2005
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    Hi Bruce,

    There are all sorts of variations of brass sidearms. Single-sidearm Willard Clocks are well known, some with one plain rail with scrolls on each end, others' with a succession of 12-15 small "leaves" or "drips" running down each side of the single rail. N.H. banjos makers were known to make a type of sidearm with "notched" connections between the rails as opposed to the more common "diamonds". Your sidearms appear to have been "made" with only two diamonds between the rails. I have not seen that on many other banjos if any. It appears to be what the maker intended and not a manual "cutout" by someone after the fact... As far as the "figure" walking down the road... Human figures were put in by many artists on any number of country scenes on clocks from the Federal period. You'll see that in the section of tall clock "moon dials" that has a "country scene", and of course on Banjo clocks with country scenes reverse painted on the door glasses. It tends to transform the picture from a kind of "still life" to an actual "living picture"...

    Joe
     

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