Baduf 3-train movement; auto-correction question

Simon Holt

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Mar 21, 2017
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Although I've solved the problem I had with this movement, for my own satisfaction (read: OCD) I'd like to know whether it has been butchered as some point.

This Baduf clock came to me with no history, and with no report as to what might or might not need fixing. Just a statement saying "it had not been run for some time".
2021-02-24 12.48.10.jpg
During my initial triage, I discovered that the chime auto-correction was not operating; in that it did not hold the chime train in warning after the three-quarters chime. On inspection I could see that a previous repairer had added a brass ferrule with a grub screw to the end of the lifting lever, to create more lift. Here it is, after the three-quarters chime:
WIN_20210224_12_52_28_Pro.jpg
The extra lift that this created was the problem; the lever was being lifted too high so that the train was always released, every quarter. I was able to solve the problem by (a) removing that ferrule and (b) applying a slight twist to the lifting lever on the right in the above picture.

This movement is nearly identical to Enfield movements, because Enfield acquired the rights to use the Baduf design. So here's my question: has the auto-correction hold lever on the left been modified? Enfields don't have this kind of cut-out, as best I can remember:
WIN_20210225_12_16_21_Pro.jpg
Did someone create that cut-out because the lever was being lifted too high? Or is it original?

Simon
 

shutterbug

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It doesn't look like a factory cut to me. It's pretty rough looking. I think your owner or his buddy over analyzed how best to "fix" things :)
 

Simon Holt

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It's pretty rough looking.
The depth of field isn't great in this shot, but the cut-out is actually quite smooth:
WIN_20210225_12_17_40_Pro.jpg
But, the cut-out is longer than it needs to be and wouldn't have been needed at all if the lever had been made with a different profile to start with. So, like you, I think it's butchery. Given the other things wrong with the movement (the chime pin drum was set to the wrong position for Westminster chimes, the pendulum crutch and hangar were from two different clocks, and the rack hook spring-assist was disconnected), I think the evidence points to someone even more amateur than I...

Simon
 

Simon Holt

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Another question regarding this Baduf. (I'm never sure whether to start a new thread when it's the same clock, so that the thread title matches the query, but here goes...)

The back plate has removable plates (bushings?) for the winding arbors:
2021-02-26 11.46.53.jpg
I was expecting that these would facilitate removal of the barrels without the need to disassemble the movement. But they don't - the winding arbour is not a 2-piece arrangement, and the front plate has no slots:
2021-02-26 11.49.32.jpg
So what are those removable plates/bushings for?

Simon
 

shutterbug

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They appear to be a secondary bushing of sorts. The thick part of the arbor protrudes through the plate, but does not likely provide a good bearing surface.
And yes, keeping all questions about a single clock in one thread is the best way to go.
 
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wow

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Since the winding arbors only turn when winding, a thin bushing is all that’s needed. I assume they are made of steel? Actually a good idea, I think. If they wear, it would be easy to make them and replace them. Is the front bushed through the plate like other clocks?
 

Simon Holt

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Mar 21, 2017
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Since the winding arbors only turn when winding, a thin bushing is all that’s needed. I assume they are made of steel? Actually a good idea, I think. If they wear, it would be easy to make them and replace them. Is the front bushed through the plate like other clocks?
I thought they were brass, from the colour, but you made me check and a magnet test proved they are indeed steel. I can't see a separate bushing in the front plate though. I'll take a closer look when I strip it down.

But: why the key-hole shape in the rear plate?

Simon
 

Simon Holt

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But: why the key-hole shape in the rear plate?
I found the answer: the spring barrels have matching key-hole cut-outs that, when aligned with the ones in the plate, allow the winding arbors to be removed (the cut-out allows the hook on the arbour to pass through):
2021-02-28 12.19.48.jpg
So the barrels CAN be removed and re-fitted without splitting the plates.

Simon
 

Simon Holt

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Mar 21, 2017
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That’s a new one for me. Neat!!
It does make it slightly more fiddly to use the original arbors and barrels in my Joe Collins winder, but it will make final reassembly easier.

Simon
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff