Av a look at this.

0132joshua

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Dec 24, 2015
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Av a look at this in disgust, one must wonder as to the thought and actions gone into this.

9CT Omega , dates to 1939 via numbers, just look at that dial, the movement is keeping very good time, some idiot attempted repair , with movement not de cased, as can be seen via debris around edge of movement, incredible idiot or what. Av a word with the lug repairs, bits of woteva soldered on. OK, lets move on to save this watch which has survived many years.

Advice welcome, many thanks in advance. would it have been fixed bars or spring bars, i would like to convert to spring bars, after sweating the solder off i will have a better view. Re spring bar conversion, would it be best to drill in a drill press or somehow secure the case to use a watchmakers lathe. Again many thanks.

IMG_1056.jpg IMG_1057.jpg IMG_1058.jpg IMG_1059.jpg IMG_1060.jpg IMG_1061.jpg
 
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Dave T

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That ser. no. would date this watch to be about 1939. Interesting case!
 

everydaycats

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Aug 11, 2011
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Av a look at this in disgust, one must wonder as to the thought and actions gone into this.

9CT Omega , dates to 1939 via numbers, just look at that dial, the movement is keeping very good time, some idiot attempted repair , with movement not de cased, as can be seen via debris around edge of movement, incredible idiot or what. Av a word with the lug repairs, bits of woteva soldered on. OK, lets move on to save this watch which has survived many years.

Advice welcome, many thanks in advance. would it have been fixed bars or spring bars, i would like to convert to spring bars, after sweating the solder off i will have a better view. Re spring bar conversion, would it be best to drill in a drill press or somehow secure the case to use a watchmakers lathe. Again many thanks.

View attachment 714055 View attachment 714056 View attachment 714057 View attachment 714058 View attachment 714059 View attachment 714060
I think the case was blinged at some point in time because I can't imagine Omega making this case.
Regards
 
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0132joshua

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Dec 24, 2015
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I think the case was blinged at some point in time because I can't imagine Omega making this case.
Regards
Yes may well have been, It is a Denison case, so one will never know, Rolex used the bling and called it tree bark. A marmite case. Marmite on toast, cant beat it, its different .
 

Chris Radek

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Apr 13, 2014
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Wow, a lovely movement but that poor case!

You might find that it's got the wires because the lugs are hollow and can't really hold regular spring bars. Sometimes soldering in gold posts and using female spring bars is the ticket. But if the lugs are soldered on, you risk detaching them. It would be best to have an experienced jewelry repair person look at it.
 

Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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Av a look at this in disgust, one must wonder as to the thought and actions gone into this.

9CT Omega , dates to 1939 via numbers, just look at that dial, the movement is keeping very good time, some idiot attempted repair , with movement not de cased, as can be seen via debris around edge of movement, incredible idiot or what. Av a word with the lug repairs, bits of woteva soldered on. OK, lets move on to save this watch which has survived many years.

Advice welcome, many thanks in advance. would it have been fixed bars or spring bars, i would like to convert to spring bars, after sweating the solder off i will have a better view. Re spring bar conversion, would it be best to drill in a drill press or somehow secure the case to use a watchmakers lathe. Again many thanks.

View attachment 714055 View attachment 714056 View attachment 714057 View attachment 714058 View attachment 714059 View attachment 714060
What is stamped under the balance cock? "30", or "30T1". I've got "30" movement from 1939 with serial number below 9mln. Without a doubt, it's one of my favorites Omega watches.
 

everydaycats

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Aug 11, 2011
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Av a look at this in disgust, one must wonder as to the thought and actions gone into this.

9CT Omega , dates to 1939 via numbers, just look at that dial, the movement is keeping very good time, some idiot attempted repair , with movement not de cased, as can be seen via debris around edge of movement, incredible idiot or what. Av a word with the lug repairs, bits of woteva soldered on. OK, lets move on to save this watch which has survived many years.

Advice welcome, many thanks in advance. would it have been fixed bars or spring bars, i would like to convert to spring bars, after sweating the solder off i will have a better view. Re spring bar conversion, would it be best to drill in a drill press or somehow secure the case to use a watchmakers lathe. Again many thanks.

View attachment 714055 View attachment 714056 View attachment 714057 View attachment 714058 View attachment 714059 View attachment 714060
One more guess: I suspect either the minute hand or hour hand is incorrect. If I had to pick, I would say the hour hand in incorrect for this watch.
Regards
 

Jerry Treiman

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How do they get 15 jewels in that watch, with no jewels on the center wheel or the pallet arbor?
 

Times

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How do they get 15 jewels in that watch, with no jewels on the center wheel or the pallet arbor?
4 - balance wheel pivots (2xhole and 2xcap jewels)
1 - balance wheel impulse jewel
2 - fork pallets
2 - fork pivot hole jewels
6 - (3x2 on the bridge & under)
 

Jerry Treiman

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fork arbor 2 (white sapphire?)
2 - fork pivot hole jewels
That is what threw me off. In the photo it looked like a white metal bushing at the fork. I would have expected red jewels like the rest of the train.
Is this something that Omega commonly did? I am used to sapphire pallet stones, but not train jewels.
 

Times

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That is what threw me off. In the photo it looked like a white metal bushing at the fork. I would have expected red jewels like the rest of the train.
Is this something that Omega commonly did? I am used to sapphire pallet stones, but not train jewels.
Ooops, I've just noticed that Frank already answered your 15 jewels question. I was literally counting them by looking at my "watch overhaul" pictures. My Omega is completely original. There is not a single sign of jewel replacement, and one jewel on the plate side is colorless, but the one on the bridge is red. Go figure.
 
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praezis

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Feb 11, 2008
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I frequently work on 1942…45 German chronographs. They usually have white train jewels. Maybe they were a few cents cheaper than red ones?

Frank
 

Times

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I frequently work on 1942…45 German chronographs. They usually have white train jewels. Maybe they were a few cents cheaper than red ones?

Frank
Perhaps, a few pfennigs cheaper?
 
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