ATO transistor patent for electric impulse clocks

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by DC Kelley, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. DC Kelley

    DC Kelley Registered User

    Mar 16, 2006
    271
    3
    16
    Would anyone happen to have the patent number (or better yet a link) to the original transistor patent for electric impulse clocks designed by Léon Hatot of ATO/Hatot in the early 1950's

    I know this was filed for in mid 1953 (just before Mr Hatot died, Sept 11th 1953), but can not seem to find an application number or if an US patent was also filed, as would be typical. The actual patent application seems to be under the names of Lavet and Dietsch (with assignment to ATO) some web pages I have seen cite them as "...get[ing] the patent for the transistor controlled pendulum clock with the name ATO." I see Mr. Lavert with a watch patent in the 1970s but can not trace him further.

    And a prior pendulum/impulse design was patented by Leon Hatot in Britain in 1924 (Patent No. 241856), but that one seem to relate to mechanically switched designs and a master-slave distribution system.
     
  2. DC Kelley

    DC Kelley Registered User

    Mar 16, 2006
    271
    3
    16
    Would anyone happen to have the patent number (or better yet a link) to the original transistor patent for electric impulse clocks designed by Léon Hatot of ATO/Hatot in the early 1950's

    I know this was filed for in mid 1953 (just before Mr Hatot died, Sept 11th 1953), but can not seem to find an application number or if an US patent was also filed, as would be typical. The actual patent application seems to be under the names of Lavet and Dietsch (with assignment to ATO) some web pages I have seen cite them as "...get[ing] the patent for the transistor controlled pendulum clock with the name ATO." I see Mr. Lavert with a watch patent in the 1970s but can not trace him further.

    And a prior pendulum/impulse design was patented by Leon Hatot in Britain in 1924 (Patent No. 241856), but that one seem to relate to mechanically switched designs and a master-slave distribution system.
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Aug 24, 2000
    7,135
    26
    0
    Region Flag:
    Your question Kelly, is partly answered in Michel Viredaz' "Leon Hatot and ATO Electric Clocks."

    He says in English, "The Hatot Company was among the first to embody in their instruments important improvements in horology. Their first patents ware filed on 16th September 1953, but the Hatot Company did not have sufficient funds to exploit their numerous patents worldwide, so they granted licences to several of the principal horlolgical producers in the industrialized countries which is why there exist throughout the world millions of watches and clocks signed L.Leroy & Cie., Ebauches S.A., Junghans, Westclox, Smith & Son, Bulova, Jaz et General Time, all carrying the words 'Lic.ATO.'"

    Thus it appears that ATO's application of the transistor switch for watches and clocks was patented only in France but license was granted to a few major watch and clock manufacturers.
     
  4. DC Kelley

    DC Kelley Registered User

    Mar 16, 2006
    271
    3
    16
    #4 DC Kelley, Oct 10, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Les
    Thanks for the reply. Yes, I had read that somewhere in the web but had forgotten the source.

    I also posted a note to Lothar Frerking who runs a very good reference site for ATO at http://www.lothar-frerking.de/eng/index.htm and also asked him about this patent. Here is his reply in part

    So we now have the detail that Dietsch was son in law, but still. need a French or German Pattent application number. In these older patents you have to download the actual pattent image and then look to see what other patents it referred to. A slow process, but perhaps I can trace my way backwards to it that way.

    This all started when another NAWCC member (James Knight ) asked me to photograph some of the circuit boards in my Kundos so he could reverse eng some things.
     
  5. RODALCO

    RODALCO Registered User

    Mar 27, 2006
    266
    0
    16
    Male
    Electrician
    New Zealand
    Country Flag:
    Michael Viredaz website will have the details there as Eckmill already suggests.

    The directly impulsed pendulum with Hipp Toggle was originally invented by Mattheus Hipp (mid 1850's) and used in Favarger and later Favag pendulum master clocks.

    The Hipp Toggle was also used in certain English made post office master clocks like the Gents to reduce the noise instead of the gravity weight impulse system which was quite noisy every 30 seconds.
     
  6. RODALCO

    RODALCO Registered User

    Mar 27, 2006
    266
    0
    16
    Male
    Electrician
    New Zealand
    Country Flag:
  7. DC Kelley

    DC Kelley Registered User

    Mar 16, 2006
    271
    3
    16
    Yes, I saw this link, an while it has lots of interesting details, it does not deal with the patent directly or mention its number or place of application. I may ping an email to Mr Viredaz and ask him, directly if he knows.
     
  8. Bob Pritzker

    Bob Pritzker Registered User

    Jan 20, 2005
    13
    0
    0
    In response to your request, I do not know of a U.S. Patent for the ATO transistor mechanism but LAvet and Dietsch filed for and received a British patent in 1954. In this patent acknowledgement is made of the patent application they made in France on September 2, 1953. I can post a copy of this patent if you like.

    Bob
     
  9. Bob Pritzker

    Bob Pritzker Registered User

    Jan 20, 2005
    13
    0
    0
    Oops. I forgot to give the patent numbers. The original French patent number is 1090564. The British patent is 746465. For what it's worth, the Europeans are making an effort to provide EVERY patent from all countries on line. You can search their database at:

    http://ep.espacenet.com/quickSearch?locale=en_ep

    Lavet is the author of over 90 patents dating back to the 1920's and the one that paid the biggest dividend was his stepping motor which is used in every analog quartz watch. (It made him millions).
    Hope this helps.
    Bob
     
  10. Hans Vrolijk

    Hans Vrolijk Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    174
    0
    0
    retired family doctor
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Bob,
    Thanks for the patent number.
    I was'nt succesfull finding the patent on espacenet, but found the ten pages on :
    http://depatisnet.dpma.de
     
  11. DC Kelley

    DC Kelley Registered User

    Mar 16, 2006
    271
    3
    16
    I can not adequately express my gratitude to everyone helping me with this project, Bob and Hans especially. The EPO site provided the US patent (US 746,465 of Sept 2 1954) but no drawings images, however the French one ( FR 1,090,564) had the drawings. And I also found one of Hatot's prior purely mechanical switch patents (US 1,651,119 of Nov 29 1927) which clearly shows the "classic" gear train of the ATO/Kundo units quite nicely.
    Next week I will set up a web page with the critical patent PDFs as part of my Kundo documentation.
     

Share This Page