Atmos Clock purchase

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Dutto11, Jun 14, 2017.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Dutto11

    Dutto11 Registered User

    Jul 12, 2006
    729
    4
    18
    Designer, Engeering
    Brisbane, Australia
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hi all,
    This my first post in this section and have a couple of questions that I hope you can answer.
    I'm looking at purchasing my first Atmos Clock and I've seen several out there on that auction site, some running and others not.
    First question is should I stay away from non working clocks as it opens up more problems than worth.
    Secondly is there a way to diagnose where the problems are with non working clocks I.E. Diaphragm problems or spring problems or just needs a service.
    I understand that it is a specialized field and I would never attempt to fix a non working clock myself, I'm asking as to determine if a clock is worth the repair cost.

    I hope I haven't asked what somebody has already asked as I'm very new to these clocks.

    Cheers
    Gary
    (From Australia)
     
  2. richiec

    richiec Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 24, 2007
    6,437
    343
    83
    Male
    automotive warranty inspector
    Brick, Ocean, NJ
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Not knowing much about these clocks, in the beginning I would avoid non-working clocks until you get your feet wet and know what to look for in one of these. From what I can see, they aren't cheap to own or repair.
     
  3. Ed O'Brien

    Ed O'Brien Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 30, 2009
    555
    9
    18
    Retired, and now full-time clock repairs.
    Winter Park, FL
    Country Flag:
    Best to find one that is working. With experience you can uncover a lot of the problems that may be affecting an Atmos, but it is very challenging to learn enough to know what to look for. One common problem, and you cannot observe it with an assembled clock, is a dry mainspring. Realizing that the factory recommended service interval is 20 years, most of the Atmos clocks you will find, unless you can determine service has been done by an experienced Atmos technician, will have a mainspring lacking proper lubrication. Hard to tell, also, if the torsion spring has been damaged. I have found a few with collapsed bellows but this is a relatively rare problem. Without proper training or the right Atmos specialty tools, do not attempt to disassemble by yourself. You will almost certainly break parts (beginning with the center wheel) and replacements are hard to find (not available from the manufacturer except by an extremely select dealer group) and quite expensive.
     
  4. new_hampster

    new_hampster Registered User

    Aug 3, 2006
    94
    6
    8
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #4 new_hampster, Jun 15, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2017
    This is a good question. It can easily cost US $400 for a service job, even when no parts are involved. So, a non-working clock that is purchased for $400 might cost $800+. However, even if you spend $800 for a clock that is said to be 'running', there is no guarantee that it will not also need servicing. When I purchase an Atmos from auction, I always assume it will need servicing, regardless of what the seller says. I have purchased far more of these clocks than I am willing to confess, and rarely have I found otherwise.

    If you assume you will be paying for a service job, you can focus your purchase on buying one that does not also need re-plating, dial refinishing, etc.
     
  5. Dutto11

    Dutto11 Registered User

    Jul 12, 2006
    729
    4
    18
    Designer, Engeering
    Brisbane, Australia
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks everyone for your comments.
    I have taken on board you remarks and feel more at ease at my next decision.
    Living in Australia makes it very hard to first purchase one and then have it serviced and the exchange rate at the moment makes it even harder so I will be treading lightly and making a judge decision.
    I will keep you informed.

    Cheers
    Gary
     
  6. TQ60

    TQ60 Registered User

    Sep 15, 2016
    200
    4
    18
    Madera CA
    Country Flag:
    Atmos are difficult to learn and are expensive to experiment.

    Visit atmosman.com and read everything there to get a good general understanding of the beasts.

    We have 2 that had failed bellows (thought a third was also bad but was not) which after lots of time and being cheap we built special tools to repair them and those clocks are running fine.

    We later picked up one that had the gold worn off and would not run but suspension and bellows were good....took us months of spare time tinkering in spare moments to finally fix it...It was only 125 bucks so we had less to risk...

    Evaluate how much work you wish to do as well as your budget.

    One with a fine case and dial but not running could be repaired and look nice where one with plating worn off would need extensive costly work to look good regardless of running.

    All of ours are running and in levels from mint to ugly but the pride is in repairing all but one.

    Good luck!
     

Share This Page