Are there Sources for curved Spring Washers

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ChrisCam, Jan 2, 2019.

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  1. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Hi, where you need enough friction for the arbor to turn the minute wheel but not enough so the clock can be adjusted the usual method is to use a curved spring washer to exert sufficient friction between the arbor's sholder and the wheel. Are such washers available as the other option is to make one by hammering brass, which at face value seems for a 1cm hasher terribly fiddly? Any ideas?
     
  2. wow

    wow Registered User
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    #2 wow, Jan 2, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2019
  3. Snapper

    Snapper Registered User

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  4. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks for both of your replies, snapper and WOW. It may be that what you have shown me would suffice. i will order and investigate. on the remaining Black Forest movement I have there was no washer, the other had one. The washer that was there looks spring steel about 3/4 of an inch long and sits on the shoulder of the arbor. Just thinking out loud but if you had to make such a tension washer could you make one from an old 12mm main spring. Could it be worked i.e bent into a satisfactory form, if so just using pliers (hand grips) or possibly heat?
     
  5. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Yes, old mainsprings are a good material to make those springs. I prefer not to anneal them and just bend them with pliers. I shape them with a grinding wheel. For the central hole I stake a little dimple and use a Dremel grinding wheel to grind off the top of the dimple. Then I use a diamond round needle file to enlarge the hole. Sometimes you need to file a square hole to fit the arbor.

    Uhralt
     
  6. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    That's brill thanks for that!
     
  7. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I'm afraid I'm not fluent in British. What is a "1cm hasher?"
     
  8. wow

    wow Registered User
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    I’m trying to “hash” that out too.
     
  9. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Typo meant 1 cm basher (hammer job) apologies!
     
  10. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Thank you. Now that it's in correct British, could someone translate it into Ohioan or some related dialect? My own efforts thus far have yielded, "one-centimeter hammer job," which still isn't entirely clear.

    Mark Kinsler
     
  11. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Do the best you can for a duffer.(lol)
     
  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    He's describing using a hammer to create a washer, Mark. Of course he should be thinking hammer and ball bearing ;)
     
  13. Hudson

    Hudson Registered User
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    dapping set.jpg Dapping blocks can be used to make cupped/curved washers
     
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  14. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Hammering a brash washer on a ball bearing?
     
  15. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks a good idea. If you hit a segment of old clock main spring would it work this way as opposed to pliers?
     
  16. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    You'd have to anneal it first, probably. Experiment with it. BTW, you'd hammer WITH the ball bearing, not ON it ;)
     
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  17. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    old brass main springs would be ideal to start with - but they are almost impossible to find
     
  18. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Can you clarify the use of a ball bearing. i.e how do you hammer with such a small bearing, you could use a punch on the bearing on the metal which in turn is over a concave anvil block or dapping block??
     
  19. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    To make a small cupped washer, brass or mild steel, place a non-cupped (flat) washer on a block of soft wood. Place a hardened steel ball, presumably meant for use in a ball-bearing assembly, atop the flat washer. The hole in the washer will keep the ball from rolling away. Then, using a hammer, apply a substantial blow to the ball. This should yield a cupped washer. Suitable balls of 1 centimeter or smaller should be available at your local bicycle repair shop.

    Note that a steel washer made in this way would have to be heat-treated in some manner to be reliably springy if it was heavily compressed. Brass washers would likely be work-hardened by the process, so I don't know how those would behave.

    I'm not sure how one uses that 'dapping block,' which has languished in Timesavers' clearance listings for years.

    Mark Kinsler
     
  20. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    That's it, Mark. Soft wood is best. You could also drill a small hole, not too deep, and put the rim of the washer over it.
     
  21. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    And instead of a steel ball you can use whichever punch is handy. This excellent method allows you to drive the punch right through the stretched-out washer, which will then be inextricably stuck onto your punch.

    M Kinsler

    I think I finally got the fool thing off, after which I got up out of the chair and went to find another washer and a steel ball.
     
  22. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Mark, It depends on the nature of the washer needed. The one I have come across exerting friction to a time wheel is oval and presumably made from spring steel. I would be minded for such a washer to use pliers and a segment from an old main spring after looking at the alternative suggestions here. Should a smaller round washer be needed then possibly your method would be worthy of attempting. Thanks for the ideas guys.
    Regards
    Chris
     

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