Anyone know where I can get a chain for a Jefferson Golden Suspense Clock?

mjarnold7

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May 2, 2021
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Any help is much appreciated!
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Timesavers, maybe?

I think they bought out Golden Hour, some time back, but that might not "relate" to your clock?

Willie X
 

davefr

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There is no source that I know of other then trying to find a parts clock as a donor. You can find bulk key/toilet chain in hardware stores but it will not work correctly . The bead pitch will be slightly different and that will cause inaccurate timekeeping. The last known source was a guy in Singapore that sold Golden Suspense motors and chain on Ebay. Its a shame that so many of these clocks are missing something as simple as chain. They are really cool clocks.
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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A while back Mike Murray had a few of these chains for sale, but I don't know if he still has any. You could ask him mike@telechron.us tel. 541-559-1090

JTD
 

davefr

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Ed,
Just curious if this company has an exact match? It's my understanding that Jefferson OEM chain differs slightly from these industry std. chain sizes. Jefferson chain is precisely 72 balls/ft. and each ball is .1205" O.D. (#6 chain is close but won't work correctly)
 
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AntiqRRG

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Is there any way to recondition a chain? Its a phenomenon of metal returning to it’s original state after its heated and cooled.
 

shutterbug

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Can you post a pic of your current chain?
 

AntiqRRG

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That’s an exact request that cannot be replied to. I’m guessing only a company who manufactured the chain could know.
 

shutterbug

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Nah, just lay a ruler beside it and count. What issues are you having with the clock?
 

davefr

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A known good chain is 72 balls per foot with every 7th ball repeating every inch. Curious how your chain deviates from this? (it's very simple to measure). Or simply place your chain in the motor and dial divit's and see if they fit perfectly. (ie bottom out and centered in each divit)

Have you inspected the motor's drive gear? Are the little divit's clean? If they are built up with dirt/debris that would increase the gear's O.D. slightly and that might make it run slightly fast. Non OEM chain can also cause all sorts of issues.

I find it hard to believe these chains actually stretch with such little weight of the dial. But I could be wrong.
 
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Ralph

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As the clock operates, the balls climb out of the sockets. and eventually jump a socket on the dial disk. I've taken the dials apart and scrubbed the disk socket track, and used a silicone spray, that I happened to have within reach, and sprayed it into a cap and used a brush to apply to the track. I also did the chain, and then wiped it down.

I made up a chain from pull chain for a light switch, It seemed the same size. It's not easy to open a ball . I used a razor and determination. You will have to make the two ends you join, have the links free and carefully close the ball to capture the link ends.

There is a company out east that sells chain and the open balls. I thought about making and selling them, but I have too much on my plate. They actually have a tool for closing the balls, but you can do it , with judicious use of pliers. The real tool, that I have seen, is made from pliers with parallel operating jaws, and have cups machined into them to register and receive the open ball.

Ralph
 

AntiqRRG

Registered User
May 24, 2021
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61
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A known good chain is 72 balls per foot with every 7th ball repeating every inch. Curious how your chain deviates from this? (it's very simple to measure). Or simply place your chain in the motor and dial divit's and see if they fit perfectly. (ie bottom out and centered in each divit)

Have you inspected the motor's drive gear? Are the little divit's clean? If they are built up with dirt/debris that would increase the gear's O.D. slightly and that might make it run slightly fast. Non OEM chain can also cause all sorts of issues.

I find it hard to believe these chains actually stretch with such little weight of the dial. But I could be wrong.
They do align perfectly. I have not inspected the motor, as I’m not a professional or hobbyist at repairing them. I could take some photos if possible to get quality close ups. I’ll measure the chain today and post a photo.
 

AntiqRRG

Registered User
May 24, 2021
10
0
1
61
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As the clock operates, the balls climb out of the sockets. and eventually jump a socket on the dial disk. I've taken the dials apart and scrubbed the disk socket track, and used a silicone spray, that I happened to have within reach, and sprayed it into a cap and used a brush to apply to the track. I also did the chain, and then wiped it down.

I made up a chain from pull chain for a light switch, It seemed the same size. It's not easy to open a ball . I used a razor and determination. You will have to make the two ends you join, have the links free and carefully close the ball to capture the link ends.

There is a company out east that sells chain and the open balls. I thought about making and selling them, but I have too much on my plate. They actually have a tool for closing the balls, but you can do it , with judicious use of pliers. The real tool, that I have seen, is made from pliers with parallel operating jaws, and have cups machined into them to register and receive the open ball.

Ralph
Wow...
 

shutterbug

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Look at the motor and be sure it's a 60 cycle motor. Some countries run 50 cycles, and they made motors for both. If you have a 50 cycle motor and are running it on 60 cycles, it will gain time.
 

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