Anyone familiar with 1966 Seiko Photo Electronic (Solar Clock)?

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by steve burgamy, Feb 16, 2017.

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  1. steve burgamy

    steve burgamy Registered User

    Feb 24, 2002
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    I recently came upon this Sieko Photo-Electronic clock and can not find any information on this clock. It came from an estate of Physics professor that seem to collect 1960's electrics. It was purchased in Tokyo January, 1966 I have the Seiko warranty and instruction book for the clock. The 11 jewel clock has photo cells on top and thick lucite sides on the case. I have seen German and Patek solar clocks but not one by Seiko. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     

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  2. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Oct 5, 2007
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    Quite interesting... I have never seen anything like it! What could have caused all of that brilliant blue corrosion? I know I should know from the color, but chemistry class was 45 years ago! (Giving away my age, here :chuckling:) Does the clock still work?

    Warm regards to everyone,

    George Nelson
     
  3. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    You need to clean up the corrosion.
    I suspect is was an alkaline NiCad.
    Finding such a button type may be hard.
    Use white distilled vinegar on the corrosion.
    The corrosion looks like nickel.
    The movement is a typical battery movement of that
    period.
    It will have a single transistor and use a Sulley escapement.
    These often need the pivots cleaned on the balance wheel
    and I use a light watch type oil.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  4. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Oct 5, 2007
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    Thanks for the chemistry lesson, Tinker- I knew someone smart like you would know!

    George
     
  5. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    Plain old bicarb soda works well for removing and neutralising corrosion.
     
  6. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2011
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    It might but I prefer white vinegar, I can soak plates and circuit boards in it and it removes blue crystals like this completely.
     
  7. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    Fair enough, I'll give it a try. It is cheap and I've got some under the bench. I use it as an ultrasonic solution for certain jobs.
     
  8. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    It doesn't work that well is alkaline battery leakage. You need to use an acid. Bicarb of soda
    does work well for carbon zinc leakage but that is an acid.
    Alkaline cells use potasium hydroxide. A NiCad is an akaline cell.
    White vinegar works well because it leaves no active acid when done. It will easily rinse off
    an any leftovers will evaporate.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  9. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2011
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    Ok so that's why vinegar works with silver oxide batteries, they use sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide
     
  10. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    All good stuff to know. :)
     
  11. steve burgamy

    steve burgamy Registered User

    Feb 24, 2002
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    Yes, it is a NiCad battery. 100DK DEAC 1.3Volts. It just came in my possession and have not cleaned the corrosion. The original owner also had 1964 Seiko Crystal Chronometer, Concord early Battery clock and Seiko Transistor battery. Looks like no one on the forum has seen another. The clock came with a three month guarantee.
     
  12. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    I would recommend getting a NiCad ( not NiMH ) cell of between 200 and 100mah
    rating. Get one with solder tails ( do not solder to the cell directly ).
    Use single strand insulated hookup wire ( not stranded ) to connect it to the board.
    Place it to the side in a ziploc type baggie ( not over the movement ).
    If the cell leaks replace the entire wire.
    Do not go bellow 100mah as the circuit is designed for that as a maximum charge rate.
    Multiple NICad cells can be stripped for a single cell. These were commonly used
    for hand held remote phones and are often still available with 3 cells. Use only one cell.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  13. steve burgamy

    steve burgamy Registered User

    Feb 24, 2002
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    Tinker Dwight, thanks for the pointers on repairing this clock. I will certainly start working on restoring the movement. Now back to my original question....Has anyone ever seen a Seiko Photo-Electronic clock?
     
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